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  • FIRST POST
    • WantToBeSE
    • By WantToBeSE 12th Mar 17, 10:55 AM
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    WantToBeSE
    How much do you have in a pet savings account?
    • #1
    • 12th Mar 17, 10:55 AM
    How much do you have in a pet savings account? 12th Mar 17 at 10:55 AM
    I have 12 year old cat and am about to get a puppy.

    My cat has barely cost us anything through the years, just flea/worming/vaccinations.
    But i am aware that i've been lucky up till this point, and that dogs are more expensive.

    So i have started a pet savings fund, where i save a certain amount each month for when unexpected costs arrive. Also to pay for pet food, toys, new beds etc (especially since puppies chew everything!).

    So I'm wondering how much i should put into the fund every month.

    If it helps, the puppy isn't going to be a big breed, she is a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.

    Also, the vet does a £12 a month 'annual dog pack' and that pays for both of the puppy vaccinations, all worming and flea treatments for the year, and also 20% off anything bought from them (not prescriptions). I am wondering if this would be worth it.
    3/6 month emergency fund challenge #20
    PODBX17 #122

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Page 1
    • Katiehound
    • By Katiehound 12th Mar 17, 11:39 AM
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    Katiehound
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 17, 11:39 AM
    • #2
    • 12th Mar 17, 11:39 AM
    Also, the vet does a £12 a month 'annual dog pack' and that pays for both of the puppy vaccinations, all worming and flea treatments for the year, and also 20% off anything bought from them (not prescriptions). I am wondering if this would be worth it.
    Originally posted by WantToBeSE
    Up to you but I don't think £144 is such a bargain.

    The annual vaccination is around £24 - mine need theirs as they are often in kennels.
    Some would argue you don't need to get them vaccinated every year. You only need 2 vaccs in the first year, after that it is one booster. This would not cover things like kennel cough vaccine I assume.

    I'm lucky mine have very short coats and don't get fleas, but sometimes I buy flea/tick treatments online. (It's the ticks I am concerned about.)

    I buy my wormers online- Cestem, cheaper version of Drontal + with same ingredients. The last tablets I bought for large dog were on offer - up to 35kg- £2.50 per dog.
    So if I was worming them x 4 per year= total cost £10
    You are talking a much smaller dog!

    For small health problems I have a doggy first aid kit- mainly trad remedies from health food shop (teatree oil, slippery elm etc) bandaging from pound shop.

    Toys etc: Kong, Buster cube. cheap tennis balls, soft toys from car boot.
    Zoom Groom (have seen cheaper versions but not lately.) my dogs love this and push each other out of the way to be groomed!

    bedding: I make doggy duvets and sell them for charity funds. Use an old clean duvet cut and hemmed with a material cover like a large pillowcase,.Cheap plastic oval bed.

    And what else do I buy from the vet? The only things I buy are the engraved discs when one gets lost.
    Everything else comes from local suppliers ie dog food which is cheaper than the cheapest online.
    I shop around for collars, leads, bowls etc. Most of those items last for ages. I always buy s/s bowls then they go in the dish washer and don't fade, get chewed etc. Wilco's have a good pet section.

    Sorry I can't help about the savings fund as I just buy things as and when needed
    Last edited by Katiehound; 12-03-2017 at 11:41 AM.
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    • ripplyuk
    • By ripplyuk 12th Mar 17, 11:56 AM
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    ripplyuk
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 17, 11:56 AM
    • #3
    • 12th Mar 17, 11:56 AM
    Do you have insurance or is this savings fund to include vet bills too? Your cat is now getting older, and generally this will be the most expensive part of their life.

    Personally, I think the monthly vet schemes for vaccines/workers etc are a good idea, though not particularly money saving. The benefit is that owners tend to make sure they keep up with treatment schedules, if only to to feel they're getting their money's worth.
    • WantToBeSE
    • By WantToBeSE 12th Mar 17, 12:00 PM
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    WantToBeSE
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 17, 12:00 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Mar 17, 12:00 PM
    The £12 a month will include:

    Health Check & Annual Vaccination
    Kennel Cough Vaccine
    Six month Health Check
    A year's supply of Flea Control
    A year's supply of Worm Control
    10% off Consults (including out of hours), Neutering, Dental, Food & Waiting Room Sales.
    A Free microchip or a Plaque of dental bites to help with dental care when you join.


    I will be paying for Insurance separately (thinking of PetPlan).
    3/6 month emergency fund challenge #20
    PODBX17 #122

    Debt Free Diary http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5501794

    Total debt:
    14/01/2017 £6247.89
    24/02/17 £5623.17

    Estimated DFD Jan 2018
    • ripplyuk
    • By ripplyuk 12th Mar 17, 12:10 PM
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    ripplyuk
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 17, 12:10 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Mar 17, 12:10 PM
    That scheme sounds like a good idea to me. It'll help you to budget. I wouldn't necessarily stay with it forever, but it'll help you see what you need to buy and when. With that and insurance, I'd probably just keep a small amount in savings and pay for things as and when you need them. The only obvious things are neutering and insurance excesses.

    I'm assuming the cat is also already insured. If not, I'd start saving as much as you can. Policies become restrictive at that age.
    • ericsson68
    • By ericsson68 12th Mar 17, 12:43 PM
    • 17 Posts
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    ericsson68
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 17, 12:43 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Mar 17, 12:43 PM
    Personally I would self insure. I wish I'd done it to start with. I now purchase a monthly amount of premium bonds. I'm hardly going to make anything on the money in an account, might win something, it's 'out of the way' yet easy to cash in if needed.

    I've had insurance for my dog for the last 11 years. He's had some health issues but taking in to account premiums fly up after 8 and you have to co-insure nowadays, I've paid out nearly 5 times the amount of the actual cost of treatment, which has included some cancer removal so not cheap items.
    • chucknorris
    • By chucknorris 12th Mar 17, 1:05 PM
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    chucknorris
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 17, 1:05 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Mar 17, 1:05 PM
    Personally I would self insure. I wish I'd done it to start with. I now purchase a monthly amount of premium bonds. I'm hardly going to make anything on the money in an account, might win something, it's 'out of the way' yet easy to cash in if needed.

    I've had insurance for my dog for the last 11 years. He's had some health issues but taking in to account premiums fly up after 8 and you have to co-insure nowadays, I've paid out nearly 5 times the amount of the actual cost of treatment, which has included some cancer removal so not cheap items.
    Originally posted by ericsson68
    I've self insured for about the last 10 years, but it is purely an economic decision, it has nothing to do with my dog's health. The problem is that some people need insurance, to cover the worst eventuality. So when anyone recommends self insurance they should really state that, otherwise it could end in tears.
    Chuck Norris can kill two stones with one bird
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    • krlyr
    • By krlyr 12th Mar 17, 2:36 PM
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    krlyr
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 17, 2:36 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Mar 17, 2:36 PM
    I have insurance, and a large limit on my credit card (for emergency/specialist vets who won't direct-claim like my own does), though anything else would just come out of my general savings pot - I don't have a dog specific one.

    I would consider self-insuring in the future but for me I would like to have a minimum of £3-4000 in there, at least. For the breeds of dogs I own, cruciate ligament tears and hip dysplasia are a couple of the joint issues they're prone to, plus both breeds are susceptible to bloat (which may need middle-of-the-night emergency surgery to survive) so I'd need t consider funding that (and HD/cruciate ligament issues are often bilateral - i.e. in both legs). At the minute, I personally find insurance the better option for me (and I have claimed more than I have paid in for one dog - probably claimed as much as the other's premiums have cost me too!)

    In terms of the vet payment plan, I posted on a similar post the other day explaining why I don't find them good value:
    Annual boosts - £0, dogs don't need it after initial boosters (you can titre test if you want to be sure)
    Monthly flea - £0, dogs don't need it if they don't have fleas (do we treat ourselves for headlice or scabies every month?)
    Quarterly worming - £0, again, do we worm ourselves every few months?
    Nail clips - £0, taught my dogs to let me clip/file their nails down at home
    Annual health check - £0, my vets are pretty on the ball and do a good MOT every time we're in there at no extra cost on top of whatever consult we've gone in for, and I give my dogs an external checkover at home for lumps, bumps, signs of soreness etc.

    Admittedly, I might buy the odd pack of Advocate to treat any undetected lungworm, as it's rife in my area, but I get a prescription (£12 for both dogs) and order online (£31 for 6 pipettes) - so £43 which would last me 2 years, and if I had some concern about them having picked up worms (or saw evidence in their poo) I'd buy some Cestem online (generic version of Drontal), £4 per dog.

    Personally, I don't find the vet's own health plans very economical, plus they're also there to encourage you to come in frequently so they can upsell you other products. I appreciate that vets are businesses, but I don't fall for the sweeties on the shop counter on the high street and I'm not going to be sucked in to a money-making scheme at the vet, especially if it exposes my pet to more chemicals than they need.

    Petplan is a fantastic choice of insurers though, definitely considered one of the top companies to be with and vets are often very happy to deal direct with them.
    Originally posted by krlyr
    • Pop Up Pirate
    • By Pop Up Pirate 13th Mar 17, 7:53 AM
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    Pop Up Pirate
    • #9
    • 13th Mar 17, 7:53 AM
    • #9
    • 13th Mar 17, 7:53 AM
    I pay nothing in insurance, regular 'check ups; or vaccinations.

    I pay for flea and worm treatment out of my own pocket, which hardly costs anything.

    If anything were to happen, I would pay out of my own pocket.




    .
    • tacpot12
    • By tacpot12 13th Mar 17, 8:25 AM
    • 625 Posts
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    tacpot12
    We put £50 per month into a saving account for unplannned vets bills for four cats and a dog. We also pay £90 per month for PetPlan insurance. We're seriously thinking about signing our eldest cat up to our vets "VIP" scheme which offers the same benefits as WantToBeSE's vet offers, and will drop the monthly saving amount by the same amount if we do.
    • WantToBeSE
    • By WantToBeSE 13th Mar 17, 11:01 AM
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    WantToBeSE
    Thanks for the advice everyone.

    I just realised the vets are a bit sneaky. On the list above, which i took from their website, it says that with that plan i would get a free 6 months check...but their website says the 6 month checks are free anyway!

    I don't think i'll bother with the vets plan, i think i'll just do it myself.

    i'll definitely be getting insurance though, as i dont want to run the risk of not having enough money in the bank if/when she needs it. Especially because she is a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and they are prone to several illnesses, such as heart issues.

    Re annual boosters, aren't you supposed to do that every year? My concern would be that if for any reason she had to go to kennels, i would more than likely only be able to find one that has a strict vax policy (i found that to be true with my cat. I've never vax'd her and no cattery around here will take her).

    Flea treatment i will do every month. Lods of people around here dont flea treat their pets and if i miss just 1 month with my cat, she is riddled. So i dont want the dog having the same problem, even if she just catches them from the cat!

    I have decided on £40 a month to cover everything, then £38 a month insurance, and i am unsure how much food will cost. I'll be keeping her on a grain free kibble for the short term, but i'd like to see if i can raw feed her.
    3/6 month emergency fund challenge #20
    PODBX17 #122

    Debt Free Diary http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5501794

    Total debt:
    14/01/2017 £6247.89
    24/02/17 £5623.17

    Estimated DFD Jan 2018
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 13th Mar 17, 11:10 AM
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    sheramber
    Nobivac vaccine in first injection followed by second one then a booster at one year.

    After that distemper and Parvo are 3 yearly but parainfluenza and lepto are yearly.

    So , although the term yearly booster is used, it is a combination of the two protocols.

    Now, there is titre test available to check immunity which can be accepted by kennels but it is up to each individual kennel owner whether they accept it.
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 13th Mar 17, 1:55 PM
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    TBagpuss
    The plan muight be having in the first year, due to the discounts on neutering and the free microchip, but check out prices for those items and do your own sums.

    It's up to you whether you chose to have insurance or not, but I think it's wprth bearing in mind:

    - there are a lot more treatable illnesses than there used to be. Things such as cancer where 10 or 20 years ago the vet might be saying "leave him as long as he doesn't seem to be in pain" can now involve much more sophisticated and expensive treatment, over much longer periods. And I think the same sort of thing can be true with injuries - surgery costs a lot of money.

    - Dogs are often more expensive than cats, in terms of the treatment they need (Partly because cats ate more fre-ranging, and also tend to be less good at showing they are unwell, so on average, there are more situations where the cat will be killed outright, or will be too ill to treat effectively, than for a dog).

    As always, when looking at costs and how much to save, be realistic about your own personal situation. Building up savings so you can self-insure is great, but do you have the resources to afford it if the accident or emergency happens in the first year, before you've built up that buffer?
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 13th Mar 17, 4:36 PM
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    sheramber
    The plan muight be having in the first year, due to the discounts on neutering and the free microchip, but check out prices for those items and do your own sums.

    It's up to you whether you chose to have insurance or not, but I think it's wprth bearing in mind:

    - there are a lot more treatable illnesses than there used to be. Things such as cancer where 10 or 20 years ago the vet might be saying "leave him as long as he doesn't seem to be in pain" can now involve much more sophisticated and expensive treatment, over much longer periods. And I think the same sort of thing can be true with injuries - surgery costs a lot of money.

    - Dogs are often more expensive than cats, in terms of the treatment they need (Partly because cats ate more fre-ranging, and also tend to be less good at showing they are unwell, so on average, there are more situations where the cat will be killed outright, or will be too ill to treat effectively, than for a dog).

    As always, when looking at costs and how much to save, be realistic about your own personal situation. Building up savings so you can self-insure is great, but do you have the resources to afford it if the accident or emergency happens in the first year, before you've built up that buffer?
    Originally posted by TBagpuss
    and do you have the willpower not to use that money for anything else?
    • krlyr
    • By krlyr 13th Mar 17, 5:08 PM
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    krlyr
    Re annual boosters, aren't you supposed to do that every year? My concern would be that if for any reason she had to go to kennels, i would more than likely only be able to find one that has a strict vax policy (i found that to be true with my cat. I've never vax'd her and no cattery around here will take her).
    Originally posted by WantToBeSE
    Depends who you ask - many vets will say annually, even though manufacturer guidelines can be every 3 years. Many vets also say you need to do a 2-jab "restart", like puppies, if you're late with the annual booster - yet the whole reason puppies get 2 jabs is because they can sometimes still have immunity from their mum when the first jab is given and this can null the effect of the vaccines. Second booster is given to be sure mum's antibodies are gone, and pup is protected. Well, this doesn't apply at all in adult dogs so is riduculous - half just not getting up-to-date with their knowledge, half money-making I expect.

    I would suggest reading up on the pros and cons of annual vaccinations. Some insurers will exclude anything vaccinatable if you don't have them done (so won't cover parvo but will cover a broken leg), and although kennels have previously been forced to ask dogs to be vaccinated, recently guidelines changed to accept titre testing (a titre test checks for an immune response - indicating immunity, so no need for the booster at that time). Home boarding is also an alternative to kennels.
    http://www.dogworld.co.uk/story.php/160832/0/cieh_issues_new_guidance_endorsing_titre_blood_tes ts

    It's something you need to make your own mind up on - but having a dog with hypothyroidism has certainly made me think twice (Dr Jean Dodds, a US vet specialising in hypothyroidism, believes overvaccination can contribute to many health issues - thyroid disease, seizures, and so on.
    http://drjeandoddspethealthresource.tumblr.com/post/31497486463/dogvaccines#.WMbR8vKnZS9
    • WantToBeSE
    • By WantToBeSE 14th Mar 17, 8:04 AM
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    WantToBeSE
    The puppy will already be microchipped and i don't plan on getting her spayed within the first 12 months, so i don't think i'll bother with the vet plan.

    I will DEFINITELY be insuring her, that is a definite. I am leaning towards Petplan because of the wonderful feedback i've had from other people.

    krlyr thanks for the info on vaccinations, I'll do more reading before i commit and also talk to the vet and other dog owners.
    3/6 month emergency fund challenge #20
    PODBX17 #122

    Debt Free Diary http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5501794

    Total debt:
    14/01/2017 £6247.89
    24/02/17 £5623.17

    Estimated DFD Jan 2018
    • Katiehound
    • By Katiehound 14th Mar 17, 3:33 PM
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    Katiehound
    Especially because she is a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and they are prone to several illnesses, such as heart issues.
    Originally posted by WantToBeSE
    I am hoping that you are buying from a reputable breeder who has done as many tests as possible so that the offspring will be as free from inherited diseases as possible.

    If you are going down the annual vaccination route be aware that you can generally add at least one month on to still be viable ie booster every 13 months! (But do check with the vet)
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!

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    • WantToBeSE
    • By WantToBeSE 14th Mar 17, 7:56 PM
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    WantToBeSE
    I am hoping that you are buying from a reputable breeder who has done as many tests as possible so that the offspring will be as free from inherited diseases as possible.

    If you are going down the annual vaccination route be aware that you can generally add at least one month on to still be viable ie booster every 13 months! (But do check with the vet)
    Originally posted by Katiehound
    Hi Katie. Yes i've bought from a breeder who has tested the mum and dad, plus the grandparents have been tested. Also the parents siblings from the same litter (and the previous litter) have never had any health issues.

    We (the owners of the grandparents, parents, all puppies from all of them etc) are part of a FB group, so i feel assured that my pup comes from a good background.

    Plus, if i ever decide to breed from my girl (highly unlikely, since i dont know enough/anything about breeding) I'll be able to provide new owners with the same assurances and add them to the FB group.
    Last edited by WantToBeSE; 14-03-2017 at 9:32 PM.
    3/6 month emergency fund challenge #20
    PODBX17 #122

    Debt Free Diary http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5501794

    Total debt:
    14/01/2017 £6247.89
    24/02/17 £5623.17

    Estimated DFD Jan 2018
    • DD265
    • By DD265 16th Mar 17, 2:20 PM
    • 1,269 Posts
    • 3,188 Thanks
    DD265
    Our cats are insured, but I am trying to put £50 a month aside on top. Ideally it'd be £100 though I haven't managed that so far.

    My horse is no longer insured due to age, and I spent £600 in a week at the start of Feb with a critical illness. That included an emergency appointment, blood tests and medication. We still have almost £400 in his account, then I have my own savings (<£600) plus plenty of credit card space.
    MBNA: £4382.94/£6000 - 27% paid
    Savings: £1000.00
    • WantToBeSE
    • By WantToBeSE 18th Mar 17, 4:39 PM
    • 6,778 Posts
    • 30,547 Thanks
    WantToBeSE
    Our cats are insured, but I am trying to put £50 a month aside on top. Ideally it'd be £100 though I haven't managed that so far.
    Originally posted by DD265
    Yeah i think £50 a month is going to be the amount that i am going to put aside for my dog and cat.

    The insurace quote is £38 a month for my puppy, with PetPlan. Does that sound normal?
    3/6 month emergency fund challenge #20
    PODBX17 #122

    Debt Free Diary http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5501794

    Total debt:
    14/01/2017 £6247.89
    24/02/17 £5623.17

    Estimated DFD Jan 2018
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