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  • FIRST POST
    • AnnieO1234
    • By AnnieO1234 11th Mar 17, 6:44 PM
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    AnnieO1234
    When does scrimping go too far?
    • #1
    • 11th Mar 17, 6:44 PM
    When does scrimping go too far? 11th Mar 17 at 6:44 PM
    Okay, I'm putting this here because I know you guys will understand the premise where other boards it would just be flamed. (I have now learned how to work the forum a bit better too since I was last on this particular board!)

    Anyway, so as part of OS I'm a member of various groups that aim for £ per day per person on food. That's the poverty line. So what is your take on this following situation, do you think this is too far or reasonable?

    2 adults, toddler and baby, 3 wet fed cats and a rodent. To include nappies, toiletries and everything else is looking to spend £100 per month.

    Now I don't think it's do-able. At £1 per person per day that's £112 every 28 days without the animals or toiletries etc.

    Thoughts welcome.
Page 1
    • midnightraven3
    • By midnightraven3 11th Mar 17, 6:51 PM
    • 2,740 Posts
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    midnightraven3
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 17, 6:51 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 17, 6:51 PM
    I think its probably too far
    is it doable? yes
    will it be varied and nutritionally balanced? unlikely
    • AnnieO1234
    • By AnnieO1234 11th Mar 17, 7:44 PM
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    AnnieO1234
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 17, 7:44 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 17, 7:44 PM
    I'm glad it's not just me at least. I really don't even see how it's do-able - at all. Thanks for your thoughts.
    • frosty
    • By frosty 11th Mar 17, 7:46 PM
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    frosty
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 17, 7:46 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Mar 17, 7:46 PM
    It depends how you shop,I only buy reduced food at tesco and can buy a weeks worth for £6.00 or less,we are a family of three adults.If you can bargain hunt then it's easy to do.Depends how much time you have and whether you have access to big supermarkets.
    • AnnieO1234
    • By AnnieO1234 11th Mar 17, 8:02 PM
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    AnnieO1234
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 17, 8:02 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Mar 17, 8:02 PM
    Frosty - does that include animal food/bedding/litter though? As well as nappies and other toiletries. I get what you're saying, but then adults can more easily deal with deficiencies than two kids.
    • ididntgetwhereiamtoday
    • By ididntgetwhereiamtoday 11th Mar 17, 8:11 PM
    • 965 Posts
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    ididntgetwhereiamtoday
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 17, 8:11 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 17, 8:11 PM
    Get rid of the animals for a start, that could save you £30 to £40 a month.
    I didn't get where i am today by not reading moneysavingexpert.com
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 11th Mar 17, 8:15 PM
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    Owain Moneysaver
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 17, 8:15 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 17, 8:15 PM
    Obviously you start by feeding the rodent to the cats. :-)

    Swap to reusable nappies and stop buying toiletries apart from soap / shampoo / deodorant for special occasions.

    Grow your own vegetables, send the cats out to hunt spring baby rabbits (casserole with carrots and celery) and start going through the neighbour's bins after dusk.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • rach_k
    • By rach_k 11th Mar 17, 8:16 PM
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    rach_k
    • #8
    • 11th Mar 17, 8:16 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Mar 17, 8:16 PM
    You could use cloth nappies. It costs about £1 a week to wash them and you can get them very cheaply preloved or by buying the more basic types, but whether or not that would be a good saving would depend how much you spend on disposables.

    Do the cats have to be exclusively wet fed? Swap them to half dry food and you could probably save money.
    • YORKSHIRELASS
    • By YORKSHIRELASS 11th Mar 17, 8:49 PM
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    YORKSHIRELASS
    • #9
    • 11th Mar 17, 8:49 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Mar 17, 8:49 PM
    Well yes you can eat very frugally. If you cut out meat that would save quite a lot, you could cut out all the extras that most of us eat, things like garlic bread with your pasta, a yoghurt for pudding, that sneaky packet of crisps. But how far do you go? You could drink water instead of juice - and do you really need tea and coffee? We could all cut down a lot.

    We spend £70 a week on all laundry, cleaning and food for essentially 4 adults (my youngest is 16). We eat quite well for that but I know that a work colleague spends the same for her and her husband and she thinks that she doesnt spend much.

    I think £100 a month for a family would be a real stretch but at the end of the day if that is all you have then I suppose you have to do what you can.
    • jadziad
    • By jadziad 11th Mar 17, 8:56 PM
    • 108 Posts
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    jadziad
    Let's think about it in terms of one of the most common calorie dense foods: potatoes. At Morrisons, a 12.5Kg sack of spuds costs £5. This contains (from a brief Google search) around 13625 calories. For 2000 calories per day, the cost for *just* the potatoes would be 73 pence per day, not including energy costs for cooking.

    So... it would be tough. You would need cheaper potatoes!

    Alternatively, if you only ate porridge oats, they cost 75p for a 1Kg bag which contains 3725 calories. If my maths checks out, then this would cost 40p per day for 2000 calories. So, cheaper than potatoes.
    Last edited by jadziad; 11-03-2017 at 9:16 PM.
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 11th Mar 17, 9:54 PM
    • 2,114 Posts
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    trailingspouse
    OH and did a 'live on £1 a day' thing for charity a while ago. We managed on £10 for 5 days. But we were hungry, we were bored, and we couldn't afford to buy fruit. And our £1 a day went entirely on food. So - yes it's doable, but if you don't have to do it, don't - it's not healthy. And if you don't have to live like this, it begins to look a bit like you're playing at being poor, which is iffy.
    Last edited by trailingspouse; 11-03-2017 at 9:57 PM.
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 11th Mar 17, 10:19 PM
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    DigForVictory
    It's not a runner, as one baby stomach upset & you'll be going through nappies like they're smarties.
    You *can* live a healthy vegetarian life, but it helps to afford eggs, cheese & so forth & anyway, life without bacon is driech.
    If your budget is that tight, you may need to ask if the pets are honestly affordable.

    For a short stretch with a clear goal, yes it's possible. Ye gods though.
    • t14cy t
    • By t14cy t 12th Mar 17, 7:02 AM
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    t14cy t
    i have a separate budget for all the animals, no compromises there, however i am a big fan of coupons etc, and yellow stickers. there only DH and myself most of the time, visiting business partner comes over and has lunch 12 days a month and i feed 7 of us twice a fortnight!! we have an endless supply of eggs which we give to family, friends and neighbours which is sooo nice to be able to do. i use the freezer greatly. i go to the supermarket armed with a list, budget and coupons!! thats if its a list shop, otherwise DH and myself do a military style yellow sticker run, which is if its under 50p it goes in the trolley!! there is nothing we wouldnt eat/try, the chickens/ducks also get a good supply of bread, veg and fruit, and the dogs also enjoy fruit and veg. however, i am trying to cut down on trips to the shops and have spent nothing so far this month. i usually budget £80 for us including cleaning bits/toileteries. twice a year i do order from approved food to stock the larder up! £1 a day would be hard to do if you had no basic stock to add to it and very boring and time comsuming! x
    • Ginmonster
    • By Ginmonster 12th Mar 17, 7:03 AM
    • 245 Posts
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    Ginmonster
    I think it's best to work your own budget out based on what you can afford and what suits your household. Can i recommend the monthly grocery challenge thread on this board if you want to join something to get control of your budget? Everyone on there has different budget amounts, different sized households and includes different things in their budget depending on their needs. It's really supportive and non-judgemental and the people are lovely. Remember we're not the Yorkshiremen in the Monty Python sketch - it's not a competition to see who can scrimp the most. It's about living the best you can within your means, not anyone else's.
    • frosty
    • By frosty 12th Mar 17, 7:19 AM
    • 1,100 Posts
    • 1,843 Thanks
    frosty
    Frosty - does that include animal food/bedding/litter though? As well as nappies and other toiletries. I get what you're saying, but then adults can more easily deal with deficiencies than two kids.
    Originally posted by AnnieO1234
    It doesn't include animals,we have three dogs,they go through a bag of wainwrights dry dog food (15kg) every two months....I stock up when it's on offer,at the moment it's two for £66 at pets at home,they sent me a £10 off voucher so it works out at £14 a month for the three of them.
    Our Tesco do great reductions,fruit and veg can be anything from 2p to 10p a pack,I dehydrate a lot and freeze a lot aswell,we eat way more than 5 a day.We try and buy reduced price meat again it's priced anywhere from 20p to £1 depending on pack size.We don't eat a lot of ready meals.
    Toiletries...we seem to receive a lot as gifts,Christmas and birthday so don't really buy much through the year.
    I buy a big box of surf from home bargains,£12 for a hundred washes and use a small scoop so it lasts more like 250 washes.

    I have my own cleaning business and the only cleaning materials I buy are a can of furniture polish and a bottle of bleach which lasts a very long time.i always have watered down bleach in a spray bottle to clean the kitchen and bathroom with.
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 12th Mar 17, 7:50 AM
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    jackyann
    A lot depends on how long for - lots of posters come on here because of a 'one-off' problem - sanctions, a sudden expense, gap between jobs etcetc.
    So what is 'do-able' when you've a few things in your store cupboard (even if it's just spices, herbs & a jar of jam) may be miserable for longer - and actually bad for your health over a long period of time.

    And trailingspouse - good for you!
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 12th Mar 17, 8:01 AM
    • 11,115 Posts
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    GreyQueen
    Seems very tight to me, possibly do-able without the animals and the nappies, if extremely tight. I'd question if it was do-able with those included.

    The going rate for a 25 kg sack of spuds at the farm gate is normally £5 but is presently $6.50 - the price of the remaining 2016 crop rises in the last months before the 2017 crop comes available. Based on previous years, the price will drop back to £5/ 25kg in a few months - spuds are being sown about now.

    This applies to even big purchases of taters, such as the truckloads which go into my local and very busy fish and chip shop.

    I feed myself (one adult) for £30-£40 a month, but that is a mostly veggie diet, some home-grown stuff and as much YS as I can get my hands on. I don't eat rubbish but I do eat a lot of salad and was happy to drop my hands on packs of radishes at 5p each last Sunday afternoon at YS time.

    I'd question the wisdom of keeping pets on a very low income, perhaps if they're a hangover from more affluent times, regard them as a joy and a duty for their lifetimes, but don't replace them once they've died.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 12th Mar 17, 10:07 AM
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    JackieO
    I am not so much scrimping as using up what I have in stock rather than going out buying more in .So far this month I have only bought some veg and spent only £3.78 of my food budget ,but I have used up some of the things that were languishing in my freezer and food cupboards

    I had a great sort out, and found things that had been bought and forgotten about and so am in the process of using them .This is on the Love food hate waste Lent idea .Rather than giving up things for lent its more using up what you have which to me seems eminently sensible I think I could probably feed half the street with my food stash at the moment so I am more than happy to use less in my quest to see the back wall of my cupboards or freezer


    Plus it makes for 'interesting meals ' The other day I had a pieces of battered fish,mashed potato, & mixed veg all from my freezer, I also had half a tin of baked beans that needed using up and the pudding was some chopped mixed fruit also from there that I had forgotten about A whole meal just sitting in the freezer forgotten and unloved and I would probably normally have had a quick skim of my stuff and gone out and bought more .
    Quot Libra,Quam Breve Tempus.
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 12th Mar 17, 10:32 AM
    • 22,944 Posts
    • 47,815 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    Okay, I'm putting this here because I know you guys will understand the premise where other boards it would just be flamed. (I have now learned how to work the forum a bit better too since I was last on this particular board!)

    Anyway, so as part of OS I'm a member of various groups that aim for £ per day per person on food. That's the poverty line. So what is your take on this following situation, do you think this is too far or reasonable?
    Originally posted by AnnieO1234
    It is doable for adults if slim pickings. However not what I would advocate for young children, as good nutrition is vital during development.
    • rach_k
    • By rach_k 12th Mar 17, 10:40 AM
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    rach_k
    What do you feed the kids? If you're buying them baby/toddler foods, you could easily stop that. Just give them both (assuming youngest is 6m+) whatever you're eating minus the very few things you'd avoid for littleuns. No need for baby jars, pouches or special crunchy things in bags! If you feed them like that and baby is BF so no forumla to buy (if he/she has formula, switch to the cheapest brand as they all are pretty much the same anyway, despite fancy advertising), £2/day is actually pretty good as they will both probably eat less than half adult portions, leaving some left for nappies.
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