Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • UncleZen
    • By UncleZen 11th Mar 17, 2:06 PM
    • 534Posts
    • 190Thanks
    UncleZen
    PPI Reclaim, no evidence
    • #1
    • 11th Mar 17, 2:06 PM
    PPI Reclaim, no evidence 11th Mar 17 at 2:06 PM
    Can I pursue a ppi claim if i no longer have any evidence/paperwork that I ever held an account with a company ?

    From memory I've had credit cards with:
    Halifax, MBNA, Sky, Natwest, British Airways executive club, Nationwide
    Always paid in full!

    Mortgages with:
    Yorkshire building society 1996-2010
    N&P (became Abbey, became Santander) 1987-1996
    The mortgage corporation 1984-1987
    And one other - cannot remember who with

    Bank accounts with:
    Barclays 1977-1987
    Midland / HSBC 1987-2014
    Halifax 2014-
    Lloyd's (joint)
    First direct (joint)

    Loans:
    Midland bank

    I dont recall ppi or any other protection, but that is the whole of the miss selling scandal.

    Thanks
Page 1
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 11th Mar 17, 2:34 PM
    • 4,179 Posts
    • 2,322 Thanks
    Nasqueron
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 17, 2:34 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Mar 17, 2:34 PM
    You can complain certainly, if the banks don't have any records left they'll just ask you to provide copies and if you don't have any your complaint will end.

    If your credit card was always paid in full you could have had PPI but you'd never pay any as it was only charged on outstanding balances.

    Mortgages you would have to complain to whoever sold it to you (often a broker) and as they were all pre-2005 when they started unless you bought it from the lender they would be pre-regulation so could be dismissed. The lender has no liability for a MPPI policy that they didn't provide.

    Bank accounts rarely had PPI except for overdrafts, if you had no overdraft you would never pay any

    Loan could have had it but if it's Midland bank it's going back a long way, fair chance they will not have any records left

    I dont recall ppi or any other protection, but that is the whole of the miss selling scandal.
    Not really, the PPI scandal was miss-selling. It is a claims company myth that PPI could be hidden or added without your consent. PPI on a credit card would be on every statement you received for example. PPI on a loan would be on the loan agreement you signed. MPPI would be agreed with a broker (MPPI is actually the one PPI product still widely retailed today as it's a good product as it can save your home. It's extremely rare that someone would have a mortgage and have the funds to be able to cover their monthly payments for 12-24 months (plus other bills) if they were unable to work.)
    • UncleZen
    • By UncleZen 11th Mar 17, 3:36 PM
    • 534 Posts
    • 190 Thanks
    UncleZen
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 17, 3:36 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Mar 17, 3:36 PM
    Thanks Nasqueron, that's pretty much what i thought. Yes mortgages were sold through a broker who I've forgotten the name of, and have long since gone and i have no paperwork anyway.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,195Posts Today

7,235Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • Byebye! I'm about to stop work & twitter, to instead spend glorious time with Mrs & mini MSE. Wishing u a lovely summer. See u in 10 days.

  • WARNING Did you start Uni in or after 2012? The interest's rising to 6.1%; yet it doesnt work like you think. See https://t.co/IQ8f0Vyetu RT

  • RT @JanaBeee: @MartinSLewis Boris is the anomaly (coffee), the others are versions of normal (beer). Lots of same candidates = vote share d?

  • Follow Martin