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  • FIRST POST
    • Pinnypinpin
    • By Pinnypinpin 11th Mar 17, 9:01 AM
    • 16Posts
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    Pinnypinpin
    Can the will be contested
    • #1
    • 11th Mar 17, 9:01 AM
    Can the will be contested 11th Mar 17 at 9:01 AM
    I am executor and sole beneficiary. Probate has been granted. My relative's step family have been asking where they stand and I've told them but they've now asked to see a copy. I've given them the link to download as it's now in the public domain. The will was made in 2014 and if I had died then everything was to go to another blood relative and not the step family but I believe earlier wills were substantially more generous with them. They are making me nervous and upset and have had no concern over how I am feeling emotionally having lost my closest relative and best friend.
Page 2
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 11th Mar 17, 10:15 PM
    • 27,827 Posts
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    Mojisola
    They are the deceased step children, but the same age as the deceased and have ever lived with her.
    Originally posted by Pinnypinpin
    their father died in 1998.
    Originally posted by Pinnypinpin
    If much of your relative's estate came from their father and you were one of the step-children, would you feel that you should have been left something in the will?
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 12th Mar 17, 12:56 AM
    • 37,491 Posts
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    Savvy_Sue
    If much of your relative's estate came from their father and you were one of the step-children, would you feel that you should have been left something in the will?
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    You might feel that you SHOULD have been left something in the will, but if you weren't, then you weren't.

    So I guess asking the question is OK, but doing more that that would be, IMO, impolite.
    Still knitting!
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    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 12th Mar 17, 9:49 AM
    • 29,163 Posts
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    getmore4less
    Yes, land registry info was changed to show her name only after her husband died.
    Originally posted by Pinnypinpin
    you missed the point...

    How did they own the property and what did his will actually say.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 12th Mar 17, 11:20 AM
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    Mojisola
    You might feel that you SHOULD have been left something in the will, but if you weren't, then you weren't.
    Originally posted by Savvy_Sue
    There's nothing to stop the current beneficiary doing a DOV to share out the money.
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 13th Mar 17, 9:43 AM
    • 2,414 Posts
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    Malthusian
    There's nothing to stop the current beneficiary doing a DOV to share out the money.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    But it's pretty clear from their posts that they don't want to. Nor do they have any reason to. Nor is there any reason to think that their benefactor/ess would have wanted them to. Is this meant to relate to the OP or is this a purely philosophical discussion?

    The answer to your question in #21 is no, unless I'm a grasper. If my father wanted me to inherit some money he would have left it to me, not his second wife who isn't my mother. Or if he wanted me to inherit some money but ensure his wife was provided for, to a trust with income to his second wife and capital to me on her death.

    "Would you feel that you should..." - you only had to insert the word "fair" in that question and you would have a classic mental energy black hole. I can sit here and come up with things I feel I should be entitled to all day long but if there is no corresponding entitlement in reality then all I am creating for myself is misery.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 13th Mar 17, 11:07 AM
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    Mojisola
    But it's pretty clear from their posts that they don't want to. Nor do they have any reason to. Nor is there any reason to think that their benefactor/ess would have wanted them to. Is this meant to relate to the OP or is this a purely philosophical discussion?

    Either/both. The step-children might be in a healthy economic situation and Pinny may be struggling - maybe that's why the deceased changed the will to cut out the other people. Or maybe they've been horrible in the recent years or just drifted apart.

    The answer to your question in #21 is no, unless I'm a grasper. If my father wanted me to inherit some money he would have left it to me, not his second wife who isn't my mother. Or if he wanted me to inherit some money but ensure his wife was provided for, to a trust with income to his second wife and capital to me on her death.
    Originally posted by Malthusian
    In an ideal world, maybe, but it's quite common for someone to believe that their spouse will treat all the children fairly and so leave the entire estate to the spouse, trusting them to do the right thing in their will.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 13th Mar 17, 1:53 PM
    • 29,163 Posts
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    getmore4less
    The OP is yet to confirm that the deceased was the sole beneficial owner of the property.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 13th Mar 17, 11:37 PM
    • 37,491 Posts
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    Savvy_Sue
    In an ideal world, maybe, but it's quite common for someone to believe that their spouse will treat all the children fairly and so leave the entire estate to the spouse, trusting them to do the right thing in their will.
    Originally posted by Mojisola
    Indeed, but I think on this board we can be quite blunt about what happens in the real world.

    We used to joke with Mum about running off with a toy boy after Dad died. If she'd done so, I'd have expected nothing after her death.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 1 shawl, 2 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure, 1 sock ...
    Current projects: 1 shawl, t'other sock (just about to turn the heel!)
    • Pinnypinpin
    • By Pinnypinpin 14th Mar 17, 7:55 AM
    • 16 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Pinnypinpin
    The OP is yet to confirm that the deceased was the sole beneficial owner of the property.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    Yes, they were.
    • Pinnypinpin
    • By Pinnypinpin 14th Mar 17, 8:00 AM
    • 16 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Pinnypinpin
    But it's pretty clear from their posts that they don't want to. Nor do they have any reason to. Nor is there any reason to think that their benefactor/ess would have wanted them to. Is this meant to relate to the OP or is this a purely philosophical discussion?

    The answer to your question in #21 is no, unless I'm a grasper. If my father wanted me to inherit some money he would have left it to me, not his second wife who isn't my mother. Or if he wanted me to inherit some money but ensure his wife was provided for, to a trust with income to his second wife and capital to me on her death.

    "Would you feel that you should..." - you only had to insert the word "fair" in that question and you would have a classic mental energy black hole. I can sit here and come up with things I feel I should be entitled to all day long but if there is no corresponding entitlement in reality then all I am creating for myself is misery.
    Originally posted by Malthusian
    I discovered the deceased had crossed out the names and addresses of her husbands son and daughter in her address book.
    • GDB2222
    • By GDB2222 14th Mar 17, 8:50 AM
    • 13,847 Posts
    • 74,106 Thanks
    GDB2222


    I discovered the deceased had crossed out the names and addresses of her husbands son and daughter in her address book.
    Originally posted by Pinnypinpin
    I imagine that things were a bit strained, once the children learned that dad's money was going to you rather than them.

    Dad really should have sorted that out in his will. That way, the deceased might have retained a relationship with her stepchildren. The way things are, you are a winner, but everyone else including the deceased has lost.

    Please don't take that as any criticism of you or the deceased. It's not possible for the stepchildren to claim against the deceased' will. The will they should have claimed against, if any, was their dad's.
    Last edited by GDB2222; 14-03-2017 at 8:54 AM.
    No reliance should be placed on the above! Absolutely none, do you hear?
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 14th Mar 17, 1:29 PM
    • 1,425 Posts
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    Red-Squirrel


    I discovered the deceased had crossed out the names and addresses of her husbands son and daughter in her address book.
    Originally posted by Pinnypinpin
    That could just mean they lost touch, so moved but didn't give her the new addresses.
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