Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Katsa
    • By Katsa 10th Mar 17, 1:18 PM
    • 4Posts
    • 2Thanks
    Katsa
    Damp Survey confusion....
    • #1
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:18 PM
    Damp Survey confusion.... 10th Mar 17 at 1:18 PM
    Hiya,

    I do not know really where to go from here. I am a first time buyer and so far it hasn't been as smooth as i would hope

    I just got a damp specialist survey back and i find it odd and confusing, I am hoping other people on here have also been through this and can maybe help explain some of the things that cropped up on the report.

    Note: When visiting the property i couldnt see much in the way of damp....no tide marks, however there was old peeling wallpaper and no horrid dark patches.

    ----

    FINDINGS

    After the consideration of the pattern of moisture readings recorded it is recommended that in order to control further rising damp, damp proof treatments in accordance with BS6576 are inserted in accordance with the scheme of treatment indicated on the attached plan.

    ESTIMATE FOR DAMP PROOF COURSING.
    £ 572.00

    RECOMMENDATIONS.

    2 No disused flues at ground floor level should be ventilated.

    HYGROSCOPIC SALTS

    In order to prevent possible future dampness problems due to hygroscopic salts, re-plastering in strict accordance with the British Wood Preserving and Damp Proofing Association/ Property Care Association guidelines is recommended.

    ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF MOISTURE.

    1) The main gable end has areas of hollow and cracked rendering.

    High level inspection is recommended.

    2) Dampness was evident to the right hand side of the rear extension chimney breast where there is a pipe boxing. Further investigation will be necessary in this area.

    As the external sources of moisture and your intentions regarding the fireplace, dry lining etc are not known, we are not able to provide estimates for associated building work.

    However, it is likely that internal re plastering to a height of at least 1m to walls scheduled for damp proof coursing is likely to be in the region of

    £ 2,200.00 + VAT
    Excluding re decoration

    ---

    Does that price seem reasonable?

    I am not sure what is needed to be done immediately as there is risk and what is possibly a nice to have?

    It seems like an awful lot of money when i can't even see it? I have been told surveyor reports tend to look worse than what it is.

    Any thoughts would be appreciated we are sadly past our cooling off period on the mortgage acceptance so if we back out now it would cost us....however if the above is needed and could cost more i am not sure we can afford it. Gaarrgghh nothing is ever simple eh
Page 1
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 10th Mar 17, 1:39 PM
    • 941 Posts
    • 1,474 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #2
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:39 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:39 PM
    I just got a damp specialist survey back and i find it odd and confusing, I am hoping other people on here have also been through this and can maybe help explain some of the things that cropped up on the report.

    Note: When visiting the property i couldnt see much in the way of damp....no tide marks, however there was old peeling wallpaper and no horrid dark patches.
    Originally posted by Katsa
    You had one of these free "surveys" didn't you. It is a sales pitch for expensive work that is generally unnecessary and further work will be needed in another ten years time.

    Ventilating the disused chimneys and repairs to the external render are probably the only points you need to consider. The render, if lime, should be sympathetically repaired - Not with cement, acrylics, or painted with Sandtex (or similar) paints.

    Some photos of the house along with some idea of how old it is would help.


    I've also got peeling wallpaper, and no doubt would be quoted for no end of expensive remedial work. The wallpaper has been up for over thirty years and have had bouts of condensation. Fixing issues such as leaking downpipes, dislodged roof tiles, and generally warming the place up a few degrees has helped considerably.
    So many cats, so few good recipes.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Katsa
    • By Katsa 10th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Katsa
    • #3
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    Hi thanks for the quick reply

    i did not have a free survey done, this is the 2nd paid for survey. The first was the valuation survey, who said they are ok with everything but get a damp specialist in to take a look at some stuff. So i paid for a local damp and timber specialist.

    Strangely enough there is an entire page dedicated on how to mix plaster...i guess its helpful if i want to do it myself but seems out of place.

    To answer some other questions, the house is approx 112 years old, semi detached and is made of solid stone/brick and a solid ground floor.

    As for pictures i did not get any pictures in the report specifically pointing where the issues are.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 10th Mar 17, 2:03 PM
    • 941 Posts
    • 1,474 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #4
    • 10th Mar 17, 2:03 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Mar 17, 2:03 PM
    To answer some other questions, the house is approx 112 years old, semi detached and is made of solid stone/brick and a solid ground floor.
    Originally posted by Katsa
    In which case, you most certainly do not want the tanking/plastering system applied to the walls - All this will do is push the moisture in to the floor and aggravate any damp issues that might currently exist.

    If the mortgage company is insisting on a damp report, then you need a company that has experience of old properties, their construction, and appropriate long term treatments. If you pop over to http://www.periodproperty.co.uk/forum/ I'm sure someone can recommend a proper surveyor who knows about older properties.
    So many cats, so few good recipes.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Katsa
    • By Katsa 10th Mar 17, 2:33 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Katsa
    • #5
    • 10th Mar 17, 2:33 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Mar 17, 2:33 PM
    Ok so it sounds like the gable end should be done and the ventilation first. I keep reading different things about "rising damp" some sites say it isn't a thing and chemical treatments are a waste and others say it does.

    I could hold off on that stuff (damp proof course and re-plastering)....as long as the house wont become dangerous if i don't repair it in the first few months. Then get a different surveyor in for a more thorough inspection.

    The mortgage company ins't wanting a damp survey, they accepted the application (they just recommended we get one for ourselves).

    My worry is immediate costs before moving in once the property is bought. I wont be able to afford thousands to fix stuff before moving in and redecorate.

    Thank you for the link, i will check it out to look.
    • ST1991
    • By ST1991 10th Mar 17, 3:03 PM
    • 292 Posts
    • 136 Thanks
    ST1991
    • #6
    • 10th Mar 17, 3:03 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Mar 17, 3:03 PM
    Not sure if this helps, but we bought our first house a few months ago. Oddly it was estimated 1900 build, but the old owner popped round with original deeds a few weeks ago that date to mid 1800's so i'm confused, but nevermind!

    Ours too is solid stone walls, concrete floors.
    We had 2 damp quotes, both around the same ballpark figure but only one offering to tank every wall.
    We couldn't initially afford the £££££ but since moving in and airing the house out it has got dramatically better.
    We stripped the damp wallpaper, cut down the grape vine growing up the back of the house and moved everything away from the exterior walls. Heat, open windows, repeat.

    The back of the house is still damp, but i think it will take months to dry out.
    The tenant who lived here for 8 years before it was sold never opened a single window, painted over the wallpaper every year to get rid of the 'damp smell' and had a non condensing tumble drier under the stairs.....

    Surprising what 'drying' it out for a few months will achieve, before taking drastic action.
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 10th Mar 17, 4:59 PM
    • 2,332 Posts
    • 1,282 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #7
    • 10th Mar 17, 4:59 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Mar 17, 4:59 PM
    Who was this surveyor that you paid to do a damp survey? Are the associated with a company that sells damp treatments or are they actually independent and the prices are therefore just estimates?
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 10th Mar 17, 11:43 PM
    • 941 Posts
    • 1,474 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #8
    • 10th Mar 17, 11:43 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Mar 17, 11:43 PM
    I could hold off on that stuff (damp proof course and re-plastering)....as long as the house wont become dangerous if i don't repair it in the first few months. Then get a different surveyor in for a more thorough inspection.
    Originally posted by Katsa
    The house has been standing for 112 years already - Another couple isn't going to make any difference.

    I would suggest living in the place for at least six months and give it time to air & dry out. Prioritise the work that *needs* doing (the cracked/blown render would be top of the list) and take your time with the other jobs. if you are practical minded, plastering with lime isn't that difficult and in some respects easier than using gypsum. Well worth taking a course with someone like Mike Wye - They may even be able to recommend a surveyor.
    So many cats, so few good recipes.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Katsa
    • By Katsa 15th Mar 17, 12:42 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Katsa
    • #9
    • 15th Mar 17, 12:42 PM
    • #9
    • 15th Mar 17, 12:42 PM
    Thank you all for the replies, it has been really useful

    To answer some questions, the surveyor (Mike Thomas preservation) also has their own team that carry out damp and timber repairs. i thought all places were like that, so i am a bit skeptical now knowing they aren't.

    I think we are going to take some of the advice above and repair the essentials which is the disused flume ventilation thing and the gable end crack (need to find who can do both now).

    When we move in, we will be replacing the carpets to wooden floors and painting the walls anyway so we will assess how bad it looks or feels when we do that, and live in the place for a few months to see if the musty smell goes and if any mold starts appearing.

    I got the report through the post which had a diagram of the ground floor....Strangely nothing about the first floor. they lined out the living room, dining room and part of the kitchen as all needing to have a damp proof course chemical injection.

    Fingers crossed we get the house though, we still love it *We are at the stage where we paid our solicitor to start the searches*
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 15th Mar 17, 1:35 PM
    • 941 Posts
    • 1,474 Thanks
    FreeBear
    I think we are going to take some of the advice above and repair the essentials which is the disused flume ventilation thing and the gable end crack (need to find who can do both now).
    Originally posted by Katsa
    If you are adept at DIY, fitting a vent to the bottom of the flue is something that you could do yourself - It doesn't need to be much of a hole (in fact, two of my flues are not vented).

    As for the render, you must check to see if it is lime or cement based before doing anything. One would hope that it is a lime render, if so, if any builder/repairman starts mixing up cement, kick them out. Lime render should only ever be repaired with lime.

    Depending on the height, area, and if any render is blown, it could be little more than an afternoons work from a scaffold tower (or even a ladder).
    So many cats, so few good recipes.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Apodemus
    • By Apodemus 15th Mar 17, 9:21 PM
    • 526 Posts
    • 367 Thanks
    Apodemus
    If you are adept at DIY, fitting a vent to the bottom of the flue is something that you could do yourself - It doesn't need to be much of a hole (in fact, two of my flues are not vented).

    As for the render, you must check to see if it is lime or cement based before doing anything. One would hope that it is a lime render, if so, if any builder/repairman starts mixing up cement, kick them out. Lime render should only ever be repaired with lime.

    Depending on the height, area, and if any render is blown, it could be little more than an afternoons work from a scaffold tower (or even a ladder).
    Originally posted by FreeBear
    Good advice there, FreeBear (perhaps we have spoken to each other on PPUK!) but it might also be worth the OP doing some research on the history of that gable to see whether the render is original or a more recent addition. While the blown render clearly will need some resolution, it may be a later addition that is preventing the gable breathing - repairing it with more cement may cause as many problems as it solves.
    • DRP
    • By DRP 15th Mar 17, 10:02 PM
    • 3,904 Posts
    • 3,369 Thanks
    DRP
    1. Use the quote to negotiate money off the purchase price.
    2. Live in the house for a year (or until the point where you are adequately able to assess any issues).
    3. DIT or get a builder in to help you sort out the problems (if any)
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,669Posts Today

7,378Users online

Martin's Twitter