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  • FIRST POST
    • t0n3r
    • By t0n3r 10th Mar 17, 9:17 AM
    • 3Posts
    • 0Thanks
    t0n3r
    First Time Buyer - HomeBuyer Report Concerns/Help!
    • #1
    • 10th Mar 17, 9:17 AM
    First Time Buyer - HomeBuyer Report Concerns/Help! 10th Mar 17 at 9:17 AM
    Hi All,

    I am a first time buyer & have just received my HomeBuyer report back, there appears to be a lot of 3's which is making me worry & think about not going ahead with the sale, so i'm just after some advice please if anyone can help me, it all seems so overwhelming

    My concerns from the report are these:

    Roof coverings
    The roofs are covered with slates. The roof is lined internally with sarking felt.
    The roof lining is torn close to the ridge. This could lead to damp and damage to the property. This is a risk to the building and we refer you to our comments in Section J.
    Otherwise, the remaining roof coverings appear in acceptable condition. The covering should be regularly inspected and maintained in good condition as any minor disrepair could lead to considerable leakage and decay.
    Main walls
    High damp meter readings were recorded in several areas throughout the ground floor. We believe these high reading are due to a combination of factors such as the absence of an effective damp-proof course and the high external ground levels bridging the damp-proof course. These defects could lead to timber decay, disrepair and damage to the property. This is a risk to the building and we refer you to our comments in Section J.
    The walls contain an electro-osmotic (electrical wire type) damp-proof course.
    Walls and partitions
    High damp meter readings were recorded to several areas on the ground floor as reported previously. This could lead to timber decay and damage to the property.
    There is some cracking in a few partitions, for example in the fron bedroom at the junction of the front wall and the party wall. These are not structurally significant and may re-open seasonally if filled.
    Other
    The rear boundary wall is unstable. This is a risk to persons and we refer you to our comments in Section J.
    The comments in Section J state the following:

    Main walls - damp present.
    Other - unstable boundary wall.

    The Damp is the main concern, can somebody please help or shed some light, sorry if i've posted anything incorrectly, if you require any other information please let me know
Page 1
    • gembert83
    • By gembert83 10th Mar 17, 1:04 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 113 Thanks
    gembert83
    • #2
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:04 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:04 PM
    Although there is the possibility it may cost you, it would be a really good idea to get a specialist company (such as a damp cure company/or a builder for the wall) to go in and quote for the works that may be needed. Dependent on what they tell you, you could always then use those quotes to renegotiate the purchase price i.e. get the money needed for the remedial works knocked off.
    • ACG
    • By ACG 10th Mar 17, 1:07 PM
    • 14,548 Posts
    • 7,260 Thanks
    ACG
    • #3
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:07 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:07 PM
    There appears to be 3 issues:
    Damp - you need a specialist report. Anything short of that and it is difficult to work out what the cost will be.
    Roof - call a couple of builders, it should be easy enough to get a ball park figure.
    Wall - depending on the size of the wall you could probably replace this with a fence for a couple of hundred if you do it yourself.

    The damp is the big one, but you will only know if you get a professional down to take a look at it.
    I am a Mortgage Adviser
    You should note that this site doesn't check my status as a mortgage adviser, so you need to take my word for it. This signature is here as I follow MSE's Mortgage Adviser Code of Conduct. Any posts on here are for information and discussion purposes only and shouldn't be seen as financial advice.
    • m0t
    • By m0t 10th Mar 17, 1:16 PM
    • 249 Posts
    • 135 Thanks
    m0t
    • #4
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:16 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:16 PM
    The evidence on electro osmotic damp proofing is sketchy and the suggestion is that it doesn't work.

    I suspect you will need to have a chemical damp proofing installed in all the walls so would suggest getting a proper damp surveyor in, ideally one that doesn't sell any of the products so you know they are impartial.
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 10th Mar 17, 1:45 PM
    • 3,495 Posts
    • 3,075 Thanks
    Hoploz
    • #5
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:45 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:45 PM
    There are many causes of damp. When was the house built? If it is very old, without cavity walls, then it should be plastered and painted with breathable materials such as lime plaster. Where modern materials have been used eg during modernisation works, these prevent the building from breathing and damp will be trapped.

    Of course there are other reasons for damp such as leaking pipes, poor sealing around showers, condensation, chimney flashing, cavity wall insulation, poorly fitting gutters and downpipes etc, so it's also important to understand the layout of the building to establish whether any other factors are relevant.

    We often read about damp 'specialists' injecting damp proof courses into houses, hacking off plaster and making good at huge expense. Then later the problems recur, as rising damp was not the cause (some say it doesn't exist) but other reasons such as those above have not been addressed.
    Last edited by Hoploz; 10-03-2017 at 1:48 PM.
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 10th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    • 3,495 Posts
    • 3,075 Thanks
    Hoploz
    • #6
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:52 PM
    You might be interested in this thread posted today
    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5615879
    • t0n3r
    • By t0n3r 10th Mar 17, 2:45 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    t0n3r
    • #7
    • 10th Mar 17, 2:45 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Mar 17, 2:45 PM
    The house was build in 1900 according to the report so I guess you'd expect issues, I've voiced all my concerns to the Estate Agent so will see what's said, thanks for all the advice/comments
    • t0n3r
    • By t0n3r 14th Mar 17, 8:38 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    t0n3r
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 17, 8:38 AM
    • #8
    • 14th Mar 17, 8:38 AM
    I have voiced my concerns as highlighted in this post to the Estate Agent & they have spoken with the seller, the seller is not willing to budge at all on the price or help out the electro-osmotic damp-proof course has a guarantee so awaiting to see if that will cover the Damp issues which have been found, i'll look at getting quotes from a builder for the wall & a roofer to check the torn lining in the roof near the ridge, depending on price etc might have to let this one go shame really,

    Appreciate all the advice
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