Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • spendaholiceejit
    • By spendaholiceejit 9th Mar 17, 9:58 AM
    • 319Posts
    • 3,355Thanks
    spendaholiceejit
    Has anyone retrained as a teacher in their 30s (and older)
    • #1
    • 9th Mar 17, 9:58 AM
    Has anyone retrained as a teacher in their 30s (and older) 9th Mar 17 at 9:58 AM
    Hi,
    I'm at a bit of a crossroads in terms of career. 6 months ago my job was put into consultation. I offered to cut my hours and this was accepted, it isn't really working out well.

    As part of my job (we are required to give back to the community by volunteering and i've always loved this) , I visit schools and teach children arts. Now, with my spare time with my reduced hours I have started a company offering these classes to children and its been popular.

    My husband is encouraging me to leave work and retrain as a primary teacher. We should be able to afford it if I take a part time job (basically something that will pay the food bills) I already know work is scarce in this field, but I can't stop thinking about it. I'm also under no impression that teaching would be easy... I know exactly how difficult it would be. I'd love to hear from anyone who retrained in teaching after a decade in industry.
Page 1
    • Marktheshark
    • By Marktheshark 9th Mar 17, 10:07 AM
    • 5,521 Posts
    • 6,924 Thanks
    Marktheshark
    • #2
    • 9th Mar 17, 10:07 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Mar 17, 10:07 AM
    Have you done any common purpose training courses such as "your turn" or matrix ?
    Of not consider doing one first, your pathway to accelerated success in teaching will be laid before you.
    Brexit will become whatever they invent it to be.
    • spendaholiceejit
    • By spendaholiceejit 9th Mar 17, 10:20 AM
    • 319 Posts
    • 3,355 Thanks
    spendaholiceejit
    • #3
    • 9th Mar 17, 10:20 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Mar 17, 10:20 AM
    I haven't specifically had any involvement in the ones you've mentioned.

    As well as our company programmes, I mentor for Young Enterprise and have been involved in this for the past four years and I also educate adults on mentoring programmes funded by local council and am occasionally taken in by the local college's Business Studies courses to talk to the students about industry .

    I'm going to look into the ones you've mentioned, it would appear that experience is the key to getting accepted to the PGCE course.
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 9th Mar 17, 11:12 AM
    • 1,938 Posts
    • 2,668 Thanks
    trailingspouse
    • #4
    • 9th Mar 17, 11:12 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Mar 17, 11:12 AM
    I retrained in 1996, at the age of 36, after working in the insurance industry.

    Sadly I left teaching in 2012, beaten, bruised and disillusioned. I had enjoyed the first 10 years - worked in difficult schools, found it rewarding and challenging, seemed to be pretty good at it. But as the years went on, more and more seemed to be piled on, often for no very good reason (or none that anyone could explain if you asked 'why do we have to do this?'.

    The culture within schools changed (at one point I had a deputy head who spent more time talking about her love life than about teaching, and would be on her phone in class!), behaviour deteriorated considerably (and we weren't able to do anything about it other than write the child's name on the board - don't get me started...). When I started teaching I could reckon on maybe three children in any given class that didn't know how to behave, but the time I left I had a class where 9 children were little !!!!s.

    While I was teaching, much was made of 'work life balance' - but I never saw any improvement in practice. My normal routine was to try to get as much marking done during the school day as I could (this meant not taking lunch breaks), so that I was taking the bare minimum home with me (that could still be 60 books a night). I did my planning on a Thursday evening (I liked to know what was coming up the following week so that on the Friday I could flag things up to the children and get things ready for Monday morning). Sunday afternoons were spent getting resources together. The rest of the weekend was spent doing the marking that I'd not been able to do during the week.

    And when I walked away, no-one asked me why I'd left. No-one - not the school, not the authority, not the supply agency I was working through. No-one.

    If you are going in to it with your eyes open, then go for it - it can be very rewarding. Maybe things have changed in the last 5 years. But be warned - the system eats good, enthusiastic, competent, caring teachers, and spits out the bones.
    • spendaholiceejit
    • By spendaholiceejit 9th Mar 17, 11:32 AM
    • 319 Posts
    • 3,355 Thanks
    spendaholiceejit
    • #5
    • 9th Mar 17, 11:32 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Mar 17, 11:32 AM
    Thank you trailingspouse. I have read SO many stories like yours online and so few positive tales and this is frightening. I have friends who are teachers and they are constantly complaining about their job. I *think* I can handle the bureaucracy as I already work for council and the paperwork for this is always tough although I'd imagine you were also used to paperwork having come from insurance.

    I wonder if I'm better just taking the leap and going full time at my children's art club. At least I can actually teach the children, have fun, and all without the interference. (I do have everything above board) The children love it and it's STEM based so very relevant to them.
    • bartelbe
    • By bartelbe 9th Mar 17, 12:26 PM
    • 372 Posts
    • 261 Thanks
    bartelbe
    • #6
    • 9th Mar 17, 12:26 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Mar 17, 12:26 PM
    As others have said, be very wary of becoming a teacher. My parents were teachers and I have current friends who are teachers. The two big issues are workload and behaviour.

    The workload means 60 hour weeks are not unusual. In addition to marking there is allot of pointless paperwork and bulls**t that goes with teaching. They are obsessed with targets and collecting stats. Imagine doing that for multiple classes with 30 odd students. Schools will also dump extra responsibilities and duties on teachers with no extra time or money.

    Then there is behaviour. If you end up in a school with a weak senior leadership team and a c**p intake, it can be a nightmare. I know teachers who have been off work due to stress, partly because of having to deal with uncontrollable classes week after week.

    It should be a great job, but with the bulls**t stats culture and tolerance of appalling behaviour, I would avoid teaching at all costs.
    • spendaholiceejit
    • By spendaholiceejit 9th Mar 17, 1:42 PM
    • 319 Posts
    • 3,355 Thanks
    spendaholiceejit
    • #7
    • 9th Mar 17, 1:42 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Mar 17, 1:42 PM
    Isn't it awful that it has turned out this way?
    • april87
    • By april87 9th Mar 17, 2:15 PM
    • 314 Posts
    • 148 Thanks
    april87
    • #8
    • 9th Mar 17, 2:15 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Mar 17, 2:15 PM
    I'm in the same boat as you Spendaholic, looking to retrain as a teacher after my maternity, and I seem to come across so many horror stories. I have always wanted to do primary teaching but ended up choosing science at uni instead. After having some experience in the class room, I still fully wanted to go ahead with it. But like others have said, one thing that bothers me is the work/life balance. I have it pretty good right now, and going to a 60 hour week worries me, especially with a young child. Any positive stories would definitely be appreciated I think.
    • spendaholiceejit
    • By spendaholiceejit 9th Mar 17, 2:19 PM
    • 319 Posts
    • 3,355 Thanks
    spendaholiceejit
    • #9
    • 9th Mar 17, 2:19 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Mar 17, 2:19 PM
    Yes April, I actually applied for a PGCE after my degree ten years ago, I didn't go through with it. I've always loved working with children. If only someone would come on here with a happy story! To be honest, I don't think the bad stories have put me off just yet.
    • april87
    • By april87 10th Mar 17, 8:02 AM
    • 314 Posts
    • 148 Thanks
    april87
    Yeah same here Spendaholic. It would just be nice to hear a positive story.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 10th Mar 17, 8:18 AM
    • 58,728 Posts
    • 338,305 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    .... leave work and retrain as a primary teacher....I already know work is scarce in this field...
    Originally posted by spendaholiceejit
    One aspect of retraining that many people overlook is where the jobs are.

    You say work is scarce - and any jobs going would be "where the work is", so it might be that there are no jobs within, say, 60 miles of you.

    You should at least look into provision/vacancy levels in your commutable distance, in case retraining is done and then you find that there are no jobs in your county or the adjoining county whatsoever, ever.

    Where jobs are scarce, it tends to be that available jobs are most likely to be in places where not many people live, or in "rough areas". Vacancies exist because people leave the job as they hate the environment/area, or because there isn't enough population to be able to provide enough qualified people to apply.

    So research the jobs market: who is advertising, why are people leaving, where are those vacancies ....
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 10th Mar 17, 1:20 PM
    • 1,220 Posts
    • 15,291 Thanks
    Suffolk lass
    Yes April, I actually applied for a PGCE after my degree ten years ago, I didn't go through with it. I've always loved working with children. If only someone would come on here with a happy story! To be honest, I don't think the bad stories have put me off just yet.
    Originally posted by spendaholiceejit
    Here you go then...

    My husband worked for 25 years as an engineer. He speaks German as a second language and was normally offered contracts in German-speaking locations. We wanted him home while our Son was approaching the teenage testing years so he took a dwindling succession of British jobs. He was finally made redundant from a US based Company where he was their sole European employee about 14 years ago. I asked him then what he really wanted to do and it was teaching. So he did. He did an in-service PGCE and he remains a teacher.

    Yes it is long hours and commitment
    Yes it is knackering
    Yes the children can be a problem
    Yes the inspection routine measures the wrong things and makes the staff miserable
    Yes the bureaucracy is a pain

    But...

    He loves it
    It is the most rewarding job he has ever had
    The children can be fantastic
    Most of all, he is happy
    I say again, the most rewarding job he has ever had.

    We are happy because it makes him happy.

    If you enjoy it, it may well outweigh the hard things and the pain in the rear things. I think a happy and fulfilling career is so important.
    MFiT T4 #2 update 25.95% after Q5
    Save 12k in 2017 #64 - 4340.03/4583.33 (39.45%/41.66%) after May - my annual target is 11,000 (Save 12k in 2016 thread 10,488.04/10,000)
    OS Grocery Challenge 2017 budget of 3,600 3000 (reduced from Apr) - 40.12/41.67% including stores after May
    Reading and learning about investing...
    • dawyldthing
    • By dawyldthing 10th Mar 17, 4:47 PM
    • 2,400 Posts
    • 1,370 Thanks
    dawyldthing
    I trained to be a teacher at 18. Had to defer a year so graduated 5 years later but sadly didn't get qts due to final placement.

    Once you've done a few years you have the resources so it gets easier. Jobs depend where you live, but we're going through a baby boom in a lot of areas. I don't miss it as I like coming home and doing my own thing. But my best advice is to either try volunteering in a school for a term, even if it's an afternoon a week. See what you think to it. Or see about ta/ hlta posts as it will give you an insight into teaching
    My targets to end 2018:
    1) To get down to 12 stone @12/2018. At start 17 stone 7 lbs 21lb lost
    2) to find a purpose in life work wise and have a new challenge
    Help others by &say hello to at least 1 person a day
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 10th Mar 17, 8:49 PM
    • 14,901 Posts
    • 20,204 Thanks
    pinkshoes
    I spent 10 years in engineering before doing a PGCE.

    I am now in my fourth year of teaching, and really enjoy it.

    Ok, so I don't work a 60 hour week... baby #2 turned out to be twins, so I can only afford to work 2 days a week due to childcare costs. But I really enjoy my job, there is never a dull day, every day is different etc...

    You do need thick skin to teach though, which I have. Don't get upset about silly things, don't take things personally, and stand up for yourself.

    Best of all I spend a lot more time with my kids!
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
    • Doshwaster
    • By Doshwaster 10th Mar 17, 9:04 PM
    • 4,651 Posts
    • 3,799 Thanks
    Doshwaster
    Sometimes I think it would be good idea for teachers to have a minimum age of 30-35 so that they have some life experience outside of the classroom rather than go directly from school to college and then straight back to school. School kids, especially teenagers, must surely respond better to older teachers rather than the ones who are only few years older than they are.

    Several of my University friends went straight into teaching but I only know one who is still in the profession - and she's headteacher now. It's a job with a high drop out rate of people in their mid to late 20s when they start to become disillusioned. Maybe teachers who are older when they start out are able to cope with the pressures better.
    • spendaholiceejit
    • By spendaholiceejit 10th Mar 17, 9:25 PM
    • 319 Posts
    • 3,355 Thanks
    spendaholiceejit
    Thanks so much for the positive replies. Like some of you, I also think there are benefits to going into this slightly later in life. A few of my own friends who went to teaching straight from A-Levels into college are jaded whereas I think I'd be enthusiastic. Paperwork doesn't phase me either.
    • tom9980
    • By tom9980 11th Mar 17, 9:31 AM
    • 1,213 Posts
    • 3,639 Thanks
    tom9980
    Sometimes I think it would be good idea for teachers to have a minimum age of 30-35 so that they have some life experience outside of the classroom rather than go directly from school to college and then straight back to school. School kids, especially teenagers, must surely respond better to older teachers rather than the ones who are only few years older than they are.

    Several of my University friends went straight into teaching but I only know one who is still in the profession - and she's headteacher now. It's a job with a high drop out rate of people in their mid to late 20s when they start to become disillusioned. Maybe teachers who are older when they start out are able to cope with the pressures better.
    Originally posted by Doshwaster
    I would suggest younger teachers realise they can't keep putting their long term health at risk carrying on the near impossible so jump ship when they burn out.

    Older teachers have already retrained and come from another career and so more likely to have families and mortgages to support and so end up trapped fearing retraining and finding another job more daunting.
    “In order to change, we must be sick and tired of being sick and tired.”
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

206Posts Today

2,142Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • Who do you think came out best in the Corbyn v May battle tonight?

  • Clever by Paxman; subtly testing out "strong & stable" by focusing on u-turns on Brexit view, social care, self employed tax & election date

  • Ps sadly i got in too late to have seen Corbyn, hence why no comment on his performance

  • Follow Martin