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  • FIRST POST
    • roxy28
    • By roxy28 6th Mar 17, 4:34 PM
    • 589Posts
    • 57Thanks
    roxy28
    VLS 60 buying more now ok?
    • #1
    • 6th Mar 17, 4:34 PM
    VLS 60 buying more now ok? 6th Mar 17 at 4:34 PM
    I want to add to my above fund again before april, should i just bang it in and not worry its buying less as its price rises.
Page 6
    • jdw2000
    • By jdw2000 11th Mar 17, 7:48 AM
    • 403 Posts
    • 103 Thanks
    jdw2000
    Except that you may not need that money in 10/15 years - you are no longer required to buy an annuity with your pension pot, instead you can just take an income, either by switching to income focused funds or by selling a small part every year (or both).
    Originally posted by Eco Miser
    Fair enough about not buying annuities anymore. But principle still stands that you want less risky investments when you approach/reach retirement?
    • masonic
    • By masonic 11th Mar 17, 7:58 AM
    • 8,811 Posts
    • 5,925 Thanks
    masonic
    Fair enough about not buying annuities anymore. But principle still stands that you want less risky investments when you approach/reach retirement?
    Originally posted by jdw2000
    You need to ensure that you would be able to cover your spending needs without having to sell shares in the event of a stockmarket crash. There are various ways you could achieve that.
    • Eco Miser
    • By Eco Miser 11th Mar 17, 9:12 AM
    • 2,674 Posts
    • 2,492 Thanks
    Eco Miser
    Fair enough about not buying annuities anymore. But principle still stands that you want less risky investments when you approach/reach retirement?
    Originally posted by jdw2000
    Depends how risky your investments were in the first place. You could still be looking at 30+ years invested. I was six years retired before I made significant changes to my investments.
    Eco Miser
    Saving money for well over half a century
    • badger09
    • By badger09 11th Mar 17, 1:44 PM
    • 4,629 Posts
    • 3,831 Thanks
    badger09

    My Aviva pension has over 2000 different funds. How do you know which ones are unlikely to have 50% downturns?
    Originally posted by davieg11
    WOW! 2000 funds? That's nuts!

    Did Aviva set them up that way or you did?
    Originally posted by Sean473
    davieg11 doesn't mean his pension is actually invested in 2000 different funds, just that he can choose between 2000.
    • TheShape
    • By TheShape 11th Mar 17, 3:35 PM
    • 750 Posts
    • 499 Thanks
    TheShape
    How do you know what a huge drop is?

    Check out the dot com crash. The red cross is a 33% drop then it starts going up again - time to buy surely, because it has crashed back down to normal levels.

    Originally posted by jamei305
    What's that a chart of?

    I guess looking at that chart at the date of point x you might take the view that it's just come off a short term peak and not be tempted.

    But if the answer is just to invest when you have the cash, if that is at point x you've made a big mistake. I imagine someone trying to time the market might have waited until early 2001 which looks more like normal levels. Admittedly still not a great decision but far better than at point x.
    • masonic
    • By masonic 11th Mar 17, 3:56 PM
    • 8,811 Posts
    • 5,925 Thanks
    masonic
    I guess looking at that chart at the date of point x you might take the view that it's just come off a short term peak and not be tempted.
    Originally posted by TheShape
    It's easy to see that when you have the benefit of the rest of the chart. You aren't afforded that luxury when you need to make an investment decision. There are plenty of instances where a fall that looked like that was the low point. It's impossible to predict with any accuracy what will happen next, whatever the chart of past performance looks like.

    But if the answer is just to invest when you have the cash, if that is at point x you've made a big mistake. I imagine someone trying to time the market might have waited until early 2001 which looks more like normal levels. Admittedly still not a great decision but far better than at point x.
    I wouldn't consider point x to be such a bad point to make an investment. It's better than any time up to ~9 months prior or ~3 months after. If I had been put off adding to my investments during late 1999 and early 2000 and had managed to buy in at point x I'd be feeling rather pleased. Of course, I'd be adding money over the next 5 years as well.
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