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  • FIRST POST
    • w00519772
    • By w00519772 17th Feb 17, 1:16 PM
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    w00519772
    Bad Career Choice - keep in touch
    • #1
    • 17th Feb 17, 1:16 PM
    Bad Career Choice - keep in touch 17th Feb 17 at 1:16 PM
    I was offered another job last year. I originally accepted and then turned it down a few weeks later.

    After nine years with my current employer I believe this was a poor career decision as I believe the opportunities with the new company far outweigh the opportunities with my current employer. Plus there was a promotion.

    The new company asked me to keep in touch. I have heard from them a few times since, but nothing for three months. I am trying to decide what to do:

    1) Do nothing. Wait until a position becomes available and then get in touch. The risk here is that I believe they do not advertise all roles on their website so I may be missing something and also they may think that I am no longer interested as I have not kept in touch.
    2) Email the person who asked me to keep in touch. Not sure what I would say though.
    3) Register interest in the company on their website (there is a section on their website that allows you to submit your CV - I have never done this before - they originally contacted me via linkedin to inform me of the position I was offered).

    I don't want to burn my bridges with this company as I think it would be a very good career decision to move there. Just trying to understand what they meant by "keep in touch".

    I would be interested to hear what other people have done when faced with this situation.
Page 1
    • leslieknope
    • By leslieknope 17th Feb 17, 3:02 PM
    • 134 Posts
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    leslieknope
    • #2
    • 17th Feb 17, 3:02 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Feb 17, 3:02 PM
    there's no harm in emailing the person who said to keep in touch, just to say that you are now available for opportunities and see if they come back to you! i would also submit your CV to the website AND apply for anything i see come up on their website. if you want it, go for it.
    CCCC #33: £42/£240
    DFW: £4355/£4405
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 17th Feb 17, 3:02 PM
    • 1,878 Posts
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    Malthusian
    • #3
    • 17th Feb 17, 3:02 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Feb 17, 3:02 PM
    Just trying to understand what they meant by "keep in touch".
    Could mean anything from "we're very sorry you turned down the job down and if you change your mind we'll still have a job for you" to a meaningless platitude. Since they offered you the job and you "heard from them" a few times since (to say what? "hello" or "still got a job if you want it"?) it leans towards the former, but I can't add anything to what you already know.

    Personally I would go for 2) and 3). Firstly submit your CV via the website, and then send an email to the person who asked you to keep in touch to say "Hi, you may remember you offered me a position in October, which unfortunately I had to turn down. My circumstances have since changed and I would be very interested if this or any similar opportunities are still available. I have therefore sent you my CV via the usual website form, and thought I would drop you an email so that you can take a look at it if you still have a position available".

    That way you are not going behind Mr Stayintouch's back but at the same time if Mr Stayintouch is on holiday for three weeks or his department is no longer interested in you, someone else at the company can pick up your CV.

    The alternative is to first do 2) and then do 3) if you don't hear anything back from that person or they say "sorry, position filled", but you risk the appearance of going over their head.

    If they no longer have any jobs going you have lost nothing by asking.
    • w00519772
    • By w00519772 17th Feb 17, 6:01 PM
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    w00519772
    • #4
    • 17th Feb 17, 6:01 PM
    • #4
    • 17th Feb 17, 6:01 PM
    Could mean anything from "we're very sorry you turned down the job down and if you change your mind we'll still have a job for you" to a meaningless platitude. Since they offered you the job and you "heard from them" a few times since (to say what? "hello" or "still got a job if you want it"?) it leans towards the former, but I can't add anything to what you already know.

    Personally I would go for 2) and 3). Firstly submit your CV via the website, and then send an email to the person who asked you to keep in touch to say "Hi, you may remember you offered me a position in October, which unfortunately I had to turn down. My circumstances have since changed and I would be very interested if this or any similar opportunities are still available. I have therefore sent you my CV via the usual website form, and thought I would drop you an email so that you can take a look at it if you still have a position available".

    That way you are not going behind Mr Stayintouch's back but at the same time if Mr Stayintouch is on holiday for three weeks or his department is no longer interested in you, someone else at the company can pick up your CV.

    The alternative is to first do 2) and then do 3) if you don't hear anything back from that person or they say "sorry, position filled", but you risk the appearance of going over their head.

    If they no longer have any jobs going you have lost nothing by asking.
    Originally posted by Malthusian
    I was called when a job became available. The problem was that the two jobs were at a level below the one I was offered - the level I have been at for nearly seven years.
    • dlmcr
    • By dlmcr 17th Feb 17, 11:39 PM
    • 96 Posts
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    dlmcr
    • #5
    • 17th Feb 17, 11:39 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Feb 17, 11:39 PM
    I know rural Lincolnshire isn't exactly the uk employment hotspot but your various posts on this topic suggest you are dithering and dwelling on this issue far too much. Move on, I'm sure even where you are there will be something suitable. It may take several months for the right role but that should be fine. If you have not already done so talk to some agencies in your area, post your cv on a few sites, join linkedin. Personally I think the company that you would have gone for the job with would have moved on, probably offered the job to someone else long ago and mentioned to keep in touch more as a courtesy. They are certainly not going to hold a job and wait months and months for you to make up your mind!
    • w00519772
    • By w00519772 10th Mar 17, 1:14 PM
    • 1,113 Posts
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    w00519772
    • #6
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:14 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:14 PM
    This employer (employer A) contacted me this week to say that another position has become available and suggested applying via their application process.

    I was offered a position with employer B (a different company)in 2013 and I turned down this position as well. Employer B also contacted me this week to inform me that another position has become available and asked me to come in for a "chat" if I was interested. I said I would think about it and I said I would let them know on Monday.

    I prefer company A to company B. I do not want to alienate or burn my bridges with any of them though I am currently deciding what to do. These are the only two positions I have applied for in eight years.

    I am thinking about going through the application process with company A first. It was a quick turnaround last time with company A from application to offer. I believe I have two options:

    1) Talk to company A on Monday explaining that I am currently going through the application process with company B. Say that I will be in touch if it does not work out. Company A has a middle man i.e. recruitment agent.
    2) Talk to company A on Monday saying I need more time to think about it. I suspect they will want a reason though. In that tie see how it goes with company B.

    Any suggestions would be gratefully received.
    • Scorpio33
    • By Scorpio33 10th Mar 17, 1:23 PM
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    Scorpio33
    • #7
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:23 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Mar 17, 1:23 PM
    Don't tell either company about the other.

    Go to both as if they were your only options. You don't have to agree anything there and then, and if they ask, just say you need time to think over the practicalities.

    If you are only just applying (or going for a "chat"), there is no guarantee you will get either role.

    If you prefer A, by all means go to A first, you may well hear back from them first.
    • neilio
    • By neilio 10th Mar 17, 2:54 PM
    • 214 Posts
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    neilio
    • #8
    • 10th Mar 17, 2:54 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Mar 17, 2:54 PM
    What Scorpio33 said. Don't tell either company about the other. There is nothing gained from this. Pursue both avenues independently without divulging details of one to the other. Only mention them to each other if you end up with competing offers, and by this I don't mean tell them the identity of the other, just that you have other options on the table and can either of them amend their offer in any way to make them more attractive - only do this when you get to this stage; do not bluff because it will backfire if there isn't really another viable option.

    The only time I may consider a slightly different approach is if the process with company B progresses quicker than with company A, you might want to inform company A that you have another option on the cards and ask if they are any closer to making a decision on how they are progressing your application. If company A really wants you then they might speed things up, or they might tell you that it won't be a quick process. If the latter then you'll have to decide if you're willing to wait for company A which might put your offer with company B at risk (and ultimately risk you missing out with company A as well because they may never be able to deliver), so be prepared for that eventuality.
    • neilio
    • By neilio 10th Mar 17, 2:55 PM
    • 214 Posts
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    neilio
    • #9
    • 10th Mar 17, 2:55 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Mar 17, 2:55 PM
    Say that I will be in touch if it does not work out.
    Originally posted by Scorpio33
    Never say this to anyone, otherwise you really will be burning bridges. Nobody wants to hear that they're not first choice.

    asked me to come in for a "chat" if I was interested
    Originally posted by Scorpio33
    Don't assume that it will be just an informal chat. Prepare for it like it's a proper interview.

    I do not want to alienate or burn my bridges with any of them
    Originally posted by Scorpio33
    Given the tone of your comments, I get the impression that you'd feel awkward turning an offer down from one of these if you ended up with two offers, or withdrawing from the process of one if accepting an offer from the other. Do not be afraid of this. It will not be construed as burning bridges by the hiring manager if you ultimately say to them "I'm sorry but I'm accepting a position elsewhere." This happens all the time, and nobody will think ill of you. It's at that moment that you say to them that you enjoyed meeting them, speaking with them, and glad to be in touch, etc, and conclude it by saying you look forward to your paths crossing again in the future, then leave it at that.
    Last edited by neilio; 10-03-2017 at 3:06 PM.
    • w00519772
    • By w00519772 10th Mar 17, 4:33 PM
    • 1,113 Posts
    • 196 Thanks
    w00519772
    What Scorpio33 said. Don't tell either company about the other. There is nothing gained from this. Pursue both avenues independently without divulging details of one to the other. Only mention them to each other if you end up with competing offers, and by this I don't mean tell them the identity of the other, just that you have other options on the table and can either of them amend their offer in any way to make them more attractive - only do this when you get to this stage; do not bluff because it will backfire if there isn't really another viable option.

    The only time I may consider a slightly different approach is if the process with company B progresses quicker than with company A, you might want to inform company A that you have another option on the cards and ask if they are any closer to making a decision on how they are progressing your application. If company A really wants you then they might speed things up, or they might tell you that it won't be a quick process. If the latter then you'll have to decide if you're willing to wait for company A which might put your offer with company B at risk (and ultimately risk you missing out with company A as well because they may never be able to deliver), so be prepared for that eventuality.
    Originally posted by neilio
    I hear what you are saying. However, what happens if company B make an offer before company A. I accept, then hand in my notice and then company A make an offer (say two weeks later). Then I will probably withdraw from company b and accept company a. Would you advise the same this time assuming that the application process for company a drags on.

    I realise I am counting my chickens a bit here. However, both companies have offered me roles in the past.
    • w00519772
    • By w00519772 10th Mar 17, 4:36 PM
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    • 196 Thanks
    w00519772
    Don't tell either company about the other.

    Go to both as if they were your only options. You don't have to agree anything there and then, and if they ask, just say you need time to think over the practicalities.

    If you are only just applying (or going for a "chat"), there is no guarantee you will get either role.

    If you prefer A, by all means go to A first, you may well hear back from them first.
    Originally posted by Scorpio33
    What would I say to company b if I did this? They would think I am not commuted, surely?
    • neilio
    • By neilio 10th Mar 17, 4:51 PM
    • 214 Posts
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    neilio
    I hear what you are saying. However, what happens if company B make an offer before company A. I accept, then hand in my notice and then company A make an offer (say two weeks later). Then I will probably withdraw from company b and accept company a. Would you advise the same this time assuming that the application process for company a drags on.

    I realise I am counting my chickens a bit here. However, both companies have offered me roles in the past.
    Originally posted by w00519772
    If Company B makes you an offer and you are waiting for Company A, then it depends how far along the process Company A is. If you have interviewed with A by this time and you are waiting for their decision, then tell B you need a few days to think about it whilst asking A if they can give any indication of when they'll make a decision because you have another offer to consider. A will know this is you politely asking them to hurry up.

    If the process with A is still early days, you haven't interviewed or had "the chat" yet, but you have an offer from B, then you have to make the decision, will you go with B or wait for A? B won't wait around for you to accept or reject forever, and A may not progress to anything at all, so this would be very risky. Let's say you accept an offer from B, resign from your current job, and then all of a sudden A swoops in with a better offer, then you could tell B you won't start but you'd be burning that bridge with B for sure. If I were in that position, I'd accept that B wants to give me a job but A is too slow and I have to move on with my life, so I'd go with B and move on from considering A for now (and you never know, there may be another opportunity with them in a few years' time).
    • w00519772
    • By w00519772 10th Mar 17, 6:01 PM
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    w00519772
    If Company B makes you an offer and you are waiting for Company A, then it depends how far along the process Company A is. If you have interviewed with A by this time and you are waiting for their decision, then tell B you need a few days to think about it whilst asking A if they can give any indication of when they'll make a decision because you have another offer to consider. A will know this is you politely asking them to hurry up.

    If the process with A is still early days, you haven't interviewed or had "the chat" yet, but you have an offer from B, then you have to make the decision, will you go with B or wait for A? B won't wait around for you to accept or reject forever, and A may not progress to anything at all, so this would be very risky. Let's say you accept an offer from B, resign from your current job, and then all of a sudden A swoops in with a better offer, then you could tell B you won't start but you'd be burning that bridge with B for sure. If I were in that position, I'd accept that B wants to give me a job but A is too slow and I have to move on with my life, so I'd go with B and move on from considering A for now (and you never know, there may be another opportunity with them in a few years' time).
    Originally posted by neilio
    Are you saying:
    1) You would not apply for A at all
    or
    2) You would apply for both and withdraw the A application if the A application process is taking too long?
    Last edited by w00519772; 10-03-2017 at 7:23 PM.
    • neilio
    • By neilio 10th Mar 17, 6:24 PM
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    neilio
    Are you saying:
    1) You would not apply for A at all
    or
    2) You would apply for both and withdraw the B application if the B application process is taking too long?
    Originally posted by w00519772
    I'm not saying either of those things
    • w00519772
    • By w00519772 10th Mar 17, 7:00 PM
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    w00519772
    I'm not saying either of those things
    Originally posted by neilio
    Could you clarify what you are saying? Thanks again!.
    • ACG
    • By ACG 10th Mar 17, 7:35 PM
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    ACG
    Email the person who interiewed you, just let them know you are looking to move on and would love to know if any opportunities arise in the firm.

    If you do not ask, you do not get - it has been my motto for a while.
    • neilio
    • By neilio 10th Mar 17, 7:40 PM
    • 214 Posts
    • 99 Thanks
    neilio
    Could you clarify what you are saying? Thanks again!.
    Originally posted by w00519772
    Is what I posted really that unclear?

    I've just re-read it, not sure how else I can simplify it. I'm not going to rehash it here again.
    • neilio
    • By neilio 10th Mar 17, 7:58 PM
    • 214 Posts
    • 99 Thanks
    neilio
    Are you saying:
    1) You would not apply for A at all
    or
    2) You would apply for both and withdraw the A application if the A application process is taking too long?
    Originally posted by w00519772
    Since you edited the above quote after I responded to the original, then my answer is yes to number 2, but only if B has given you an offer that you are happy with and A is taking too long to make a decision (because in my experience, that means A doesn't have a job for you yet).

    Please note, I am not telling you what to do. I don't know what industry you are in or what your relationships are with these people. I'm just advising based on my own experiences.
    • w00519772
    • By w00519772 10th Mar 17, 8:33 PM
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    w00519772
    Is what I posted really that unclear?

    I've just re-read it, not sure how else I can simplify it. I'm not going to rehash it here again.
    Originally posted by neilio
    Sorry. My typo in my comment at 6:01pm made your comment at 6:24 seem confusing. I understand what you mean.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 11th Mar 17, 6:24 AM
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    getmore4less
    As A is the place you got an offer before they are either very interested in you or desperate(lack of candidates).

    They will have already gone through the "will they fit in" leaving the job fit I suspect they will be interested in is how committed you are this time.
    After last time chances are you will get one more go, so don't dither on the job, do a decent amount of due diligence and be clear in your mind yes or no once you know what the job is. if turning it down try to do this before they offer so you keep your options with A open ie. (still want to work for you but not this job.

    with B slightly different as it is a much longer time but they probably want to refresh their views on you as well as see if there is a job fit.

    its not just the job and company but the package have an idea what you want from that to get you to move to either of them.
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