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  • FIRST POST
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 12th Feb 17, 9:56 AM
    • 756Posts
    • 6,187Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed....
    • #1
    • 12th Feb 17, 9:56 AM
    67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed.... 12th Feb 17 at 9:56 AM
    67,031.92. Seriously. 67,031.92. That is a SCARY number. I can't believe our debt has peaked (and it is the peak, I am determined) at this level.

    Our light bulb moment actually happened a few months back, but it's taken since then of wrangling utilities and carefully watching out income/outgoings (using You Need a Budget) to really figure out where we were overspending and how the monthly shortfall of anything from 200-1,000+ was happening.

    We have literally nothing to show for this debt, it's just crept up over the past 8 years or so, and has always been at manageable levels, but back in October we realised we were spending more on credit cards each month than we were paying off.

    We committed that cardinal sin of taking out a consolidation loan, but alongside it we looked really carefully at our spending over the next couple of months, budgeted realistically for what we spend and have (I think) picked off all the easy 'low hanging fruit' of budget cuts and really identified why we were overspending.

    The main reason for the debt is, erm, me. Not that I'm the biggest spender (neither of us are amazing), but because I am self employed with a hugely variable income and basically worked out our budgets on the basis I would always earn my 'best' month's income. Which was, with hindsight, maybe a TINY bit deluded.

    The aim of this diary is to keep us on track with actually reducing our debt every single month, not doing it in a three steps forward, two (or four) steps back sort of way. Having sat down and put our numbers into the whatsthecost site, it appears that we are looking at 7 years and 1 month of repayments to clear the debt (and that's assuming we can get rid of the shortfall showing below). I REALLY want to reduce this term as that just seems bonkers.

    SOA below, with a couple of explanatory notes.

    Statement of Affairs and Personal Balance Sheet

    Household Information

    Number of adults in household........... 2
    Number of children in household......... 3
    Number of cars owned.................... 1

    Monthly Income Details

    Monthly income after tax................ 250 (variable, but this is the minimum I have earned in any month in the last 5 years)
    Partners monthly income after tax....... 2711.86
    Benefits................................ 192
    Other income............................ 0
    Total monthly income.................... 3153.86


    Monthly Expense Details

    Mortgage................................ 698
    Secured/HP loan repayments.............. 0
    Rent.................................... 0
    Management charge (leasehold property).. 0
    Council tax............................. 174 (including overpayment for a period when we messed up during a house move 18 months ago and didn't restart the direct debit for the new property. Will drop by a little under 50 after either March or April, can't remember which)
    Electricity............................. 52 (gas and electricity are one combined DD, I haven't checked the exact split but the total is 104)
    Gas..................................... 52
    Oil..................................... 0
    Water rates............................. 104 (also including a debt from previous property, but I think this will be included for another 6 months or so. I'm not sure what our actual usage is)
    Telephone (land line)................... 18.5 (includes internet)
    Mobile phone............................ 85 (45 for my contract, which I use for work as well, 40 for DH)
    TV Licence.............................. 12.12
    Satellite/Cable TV...................... 0
    Internet Services....................... 0 (included in landline cost)
    Groceries etc. ......................... 520 (Includes 40 for one lot of school lunches. I am REALLY struggling to reduce this, but feel I could and should be able to!)
    Clothing................................ 100 (growing children, plus see notes below re clothes)
    Petrol/diesel........................... 225 (90% DH commuting costs)
    Road tax................................ 16.27
    Car Insurance........................... 25.22
    Car maintenance (including MOT)......... 30
    Car parking............................. 0
    Other travel............................ 50
    Childcare/nursery....................... 70 (this will disappear in April as child 3 gets free 15 hours)
    Other child related expenses............ 81.85 (music/swimming lessons x2, cubs and beavers, National Trust membership as they love visiting them)
    Medical (prescriptions, dentist etc).... 5
    Pet insurance/vet bills................. 0
    Buildings insurance..................... 27.07
    Contents insurance...................... 0
    Life assurance ......................... 16.26
    Other insurance......................... 0
    Presents (birthday, christmas etc)...... 90
    Haircuts................................ 20
    Entertainment........................... 135
    Holiday................................. 75
    Emergency fund.......................... 25
    Total monthly expenses.................. 2707.29



    Assets

    Cash.................................... 0
    House value (Gross)..................... 210000
    Shares and bonds........................ 0
    Car(s).................................. 800
    Other assets............................ 0
    Total Assets............................ 210800



    Secured & HP Debts

    Description....................Debt......Monthly.. .APR
    Mortgage...................... 173733...(698)......3.14
    Total secured & HP debts...... 173733....-.........-


    Unsecured Debts
    Description....................Debt......Monthly.. .APR
    Barclaycard....................6880.21...156...... .0
    MBNA...........................9614.71...98....... .0
    Parental loan..................20000.....0.........0 (see notes below)
    Tesco loan.....................21000.....377.......10
    Total unsecured debts..........57494.92..631.......-



    Monthly Budget Summary

    Total monthly income.................... 3,153.86
    Expenses (including HP & secured debts). 2,707.29
    Available for debt repayments........... 446.57
    Monthly UNsecured debt repayments....... 631
    Amount short for making debt repayments. -184.43


    Personal Balance Sheet Summary
    Total assets (things you own)........... 210,800
    Total HP & Secured debt................. -173,733
    Total Unsecured debt.................... -57,494.92
    Net Assets.............................. -20,427.92


    Created using the SOA calculator at stoozing.
    Reproduced on Moneysavingexpert with permission, using other browser.


    Regarding the (relatively) high clothes expense, it is a combination of 3 growing children (8, 6 and 3), plus the fact that my job is in the fashion industry, and as a self employed person I need to have the right sort of 'look' in order to get work (think along the lines of a self employed personal shopper - people need to see you looking good in order to book with you).

    The parental loan was for a house deposit. The parent in question has no idea about our debts. She is not desperate for the money back and isn't charging us interest, but has asked us to save 150-200 every month into a savings account and then once we've saved a decent sum to either repay them or 'reborrow' it for work on the house (basically they want us to be able to make repayments if they suddenly need the extra income, but meanwhile are happy for us to benefit from it. I am not saving the money while our debt payments are so high - we are hoping to have paid enough off that if the parent ever needs it that we can reborrow it and pay them back). This isn't great, but realistically I think the best solutions is to treat it as the lowest priority for snowballing - once we have paid back the other debts we will throw the entire 630+ at this debt.

    So, there is a freaking enormous shortfall every month, which is somewhat depressing. Most months it is covered by the fact that I earn more than my 'bare minimum', but it is those months where it isn't covered that the debt creeps up again, and I am a total disaster for going 'oh well, we've spent on the credit card, we might as well keep going' and buying more clothes or something for the house - this is probably a significant proportion of our debt problem.

    We have managed to get rid of the balance on the one credit card we were spending on, so the remaining ones are both on 0% deals (although one expires in September). I have not cut up the remaining credit card, because we don't have an emergency fund in case of eg boiler repairs, but it has not been used for all of a month, and I hope to keep it that way.

    A DMP or similar isn't really on my horizon right now - I feel like we should be able to make the cuts to make our budgets balance, and I am optimistic that as my income goes up (when I can work more as child 3 starts school) that we will be able to make overpayments.

    My plan for now is:
    1) Try to wiggle those budget numbers around enough that we don't have a shortfall any more.
    2) Make a plan for any months where I make extra - do I use it for an emergency fund, as a fund to cover future months' shortfalls, to throw money at the debt to try to reduce minimum payments in case of future 'shortfall' months?
    3) Try to make more money. Not quite sure how this will work as I am largely limited to working around DH's working hours (I work evenings and weekends and the 5hrs childcare per week we are paying for for child 3).

    Now that's all down in black and white I am feeling a combination of relieved (to be clear on the numbers) and immensely stressed (by the semi-regular 180+ shortfall).

    Onwards and downwards (for the debt, not me)!

    edited to add: the original 67,031.92 figure was based on the total figure for the Tesco loan, which included all interest payable over the entire term of the loan. I have updated the debt figure in my signature and in all posts going forward as at 4th June 2017 to reflect that actual current debt balance rather than the balance plus interest over the lifetime of the loan. This has knocked 7,911.62 off the debt figure, but means that each monthly payment will have the interest for that month deducted from it, so it won't affect the DFD if I don't make overpayments.
    Last edited by Treadingonplaymobil; 04-06-2017 at 2:58 PM.
Page 45
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 8th Jun 17, 10:13 AM
    • 756 Posts
    • 6,187 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    Some of the comments on here over the past week have got me thinking about the nature of my LBM, and the debt free journey that is following. FYI, this post is basically a self indulgent all about me one. Consider yourself warned.

    Despite everything, all the debt, all the stress, all the awareness of our situation, I still love shopping. Sorry. I still love browsing shops, admiring interesting designs, contemplating them in my house/wardrobe and buying and living with the things I choose, and to be honest the joy of owning those things year after year still far outweighs the joy of being frugal and paying off debt for me. We are paying off debt largely because (a) we probably couldn't actually have borrowed any more, so were forced to deal with our outgoings vs income (we hadn't even added up the debt pre-LBM), (b) I anticipate some moment in the future when I might want to be debt free, rather than having a burning desire for that moment right now, and (c) I want us to have more disposable income, rather than spending an ever increasing proportion on debt repayment.

    Many on here would say, therefore, that I haven't actually had my Light Bulb Moment. It's a term that gets thrown around a lot on here as a positive and a negative: 'ooh, you've clearly had your LBM, well done,' or 'you've overspent this month, as you sure you've actually had your LBM?'

    For me, it's not actually terribly relevant whether my (designer twirly wire hipster edison style) bulb is on, off, flickering or lost without trace. What matters to me personally - and this is 100% about me, not about anyone else on these boards - is that every month when I check my debt balance, it is lower than it was the same time a month ago.

    Yes, that's not a perfect scenario. Ideally I would be finding joy in every frugal moment, enjoying a change in mentality, a shift in my expectations of how my life and house should look, a new appreciation of budget finds that do the job, albeit not as beautiful as the one I wanted. But none of that really applies. I still buy the (sometimes expensive) unique things I love, I just buy far fewer of them and appreciate them more because of it, knowing that the special clothes or house or practical things I bought years ago are still my favourites now. In fact, the thing that has dropped off my spending 'plan' (by which I mean 'non-plan') is often the cheap things; the top up clothing or household purchases to 'see us through' until we could find a better version - frequently I find I'd rather not bother with those purchases and make do until I can buy the prettier version that I want (NB WASHING UP BOWLS ARE EXCLUDED FROM THIS POINT ) - or things where we could afford the mid-range option but not the one we'd rather have - it's easier to do without entirely.

    But I have decided that, for me (have I mentioned enough that this is all about me?), the important thing is that the debt goes down. Not the state of my lightbulb, not how I choose to spend what little spare money there is after all the important stuff is covered, but that every month that balance is lower than the one before. And that one day it is zero, and that when that happens we siphon off some of the money that was going on debt repayments and put it towards long term savings, house improvement and pensions etc. It doesn't matter what we choose to do with the rest.

    I know some of you will be sat here shaking your heads in despair and thinking 'this woman is going to be in debt again as soon as she hits zero', but actually I don't think I will. I think I will continue to do the maths as I have done and will continue to do on this debt free journey. It won't bring me joy to limit my spending to what's in our account, but I will do it regardless, because I know that 'no joy' is better than 'huge debt stress', and as long as the debt is at zero, we can enjoy spending all our disposable income in the moment, rather than using it to pay back spending we enjoyed doing six or 12 months ago.

    I think it's made me realise that for each and every one of us, the motivations might be entirely different, the mindset of how life will be at the end of the journey might be different (and indeed, the reality of the end of the journey might be totally different again), the methods we use to get there might be totally different and the state of the light bulb that set us on our way will definitely be totally different, but what matters is that debt going down, month on month, until it hits zero, and then keeping it that way.

    Over and out (until I come up with something else hugely erudite and insightful and erudite in approx three hours time).
    67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017/DFD: 58,608.13/1st Dec 2026
    debt on 6th June 17/DFD: 55,820.43/1st May 2025
    • Silver Queen
    • By Silver Queen 8th Jun 17, 10:18 AM
    • 121 Posts
    • 553 Thanks
    Silver Queen
    I understand where you're coming from. I love shopping too. It's a real pleasure and joy for me, both the process of shopping and having pretty new things. My main weakness is make up. I love it, I love using it, I love buying it, I love just having it. I think the important thing is that even if you spend money on luxuries that you don't necessary need but just want, you must do it in a (somewhat) controlled manner that reflects your means.

    I am always impressed with ladies on here who live very frugally but I can't do it, myself. I get too much joy out of shopping for frivolous lovely things to give it up entirely. It just ends badly and I feel hard done by, so I specifically keep a fairly sizeable budget for spending-on-frivolous-things money only and any extra money I make on top is added to the spending money pot. If I don't have this, my entire budget derails.
    • warby68
    • By warby68 8th Jun 17, 10:35 AM
    • 768 Posts
    • 8,592 Thanks
    warby68
    I get it ToPM, you perhaps don't expect me to but I do. I like nice things - I allocate some budget to indulgence. Life is for living and all that. You can spend whatever is 'spare' on whatever you like and, frankly, fewer but nicer things suits me too

    The problem and I can't emphasise this enough is that you have got yourselves in too deep and are in too risky a position not to actually take some real pain for a time just to mitigate some of the risk. What you still consider to be 'spare' shouldn't be yet. I know its only my opinion but the 2 keys risks I see are 1. Credit or at least interest free credit drying up and leaving you with unaffordable commitments - just look what difference your switch from interest bearing to 0% on one small bit of debt made - imagine it the other way on the whole lot
    and 2. that you have no emergency fund yet have 3 children and a house in need of work. You are reliant on 2 incomes and have absolutely nothing, other than credit card capacity, for any bumps in the road more than say 50. You don't even have decent equity as a doomsday fallback scenario of sell up and start again.

    Unless there is some underlying plan to call on family, some expectation that your income is going to rocket or put yourselves in a DMP or similar,I think this should be seen as too scary a position to be in with 3 children depending on you for the long term.

    I have no wish to strip the joy from your life , or anyone but that's what I mean by a 'stadium floodlight lightbulb' moment. Its to do with the sheer precariousness of your position not to do with whittling down every purchase to miserable tat

    For the record, I have just seen that John Lewis still sell my washing up bowl. Its the 8 one and has served me at least 5 years so far and I still like its squishy bottom
    Last edited by warby68; 08-06-2017 at 10:38 AM.
    • LMG1305
    • By LMG1305 8th Jun 17, 11:00 AM
    • 74 Posts
    • 500 Thanks
    LMG1305
    Well no, but I'd buy a nice washing up bowl as a treat to my hundreds of serving-girls who catered to my every whim....
    Originally posted by Silver Queen
    What lucky serving girls you will have, I hope they would be very appreciative of the washing up bowl

    On the same subject, I am also one who doesn't own a washing up bowl. But then I do have a dishwasher, so most of the dishes are washed in that anyway. If I do any washing up myself, I just fill the sink up.
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 8th Jun 17, 11:30 AM
    • 756 Posts
    • 6,187 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    I understand where you're coming from. I love shopping too. It's a real pleasure and joy for me, both the process of shopping and having pretty new things. My main weakness is make up. I love it, I love using it, I love buying it, I love just having it. I think the important thing is that even if you spend money on luxuries that you don't necessary need but just want, you must do it in a (somewhat) controlled manner that reflects your means.

    I am always impressed with ladies on here who live very frugally but I can't do it, myself. I get too much joy out of shopping for frivolous lovely things to give it up entirely. It just ends badly and I feel hard done by, so I specifically keep a fairly sizeable budget for spending-on-frivolous-things money only and any extra money I make on top is added to the spending money pot. If I don't have this, my entire budget derails.
    Originally posted by Silver Queen
    We are as one on this!

    I get it ToPM, you perhaps don't expect me to but I do. I like nice things - I allocate some budget to indulgence. Life is for living and all that. You can spend whatever is 'spare' on whatever you like and, frankly, fewer but nicer things suits me too

    The problem and I can't emphasise this enough is that you have got yourselves in too deep and are in too risky a position not to actually take some real pain for a time just to mitigate some of the risk. What you still consider to be 'spare' shouldn't be yet. I know its only my opinion but the 2 keys risks I see are 1. Credit or at least interest free credit drying up and leaving you with unaffordable commitments - just look what difference your switch from interest bearing to 0% on one small bit of debt made - imagine it the other way on the whole lot
    and 2. that you have no emergency fund yet have 3 children and a house in need of work. You are reliant on 2 incomes and have absolutely nothing, other than credit card capacity, for any bumps in the road more than say 50. You don't even have decent equity as a doomsday fallback scenario of sell up and start again.

    Unless there is some underlying plan to call on family, some expectation that your income is going to rocket or put yourselves in a DMP or similar,I think this should be seen as too scary a position to be in with 3 children depending on you for the long term.

    I have no wish to strip the joy from your life , or anyone but that's what I mean by a 'stadium floodlight lightbulb' moment. Its to do with the sheer precariousness of your position not to do with whittling down every purchase to miserable tat

    For the record, I have just seen that John Lewis still sell my washing up bowl. Its the 8 one and has served me at least 5 years so far and I still like its squishy bottom
    Originally posted by warby68
    Eight pounds?! Rip off

    We are in a somewhat high risk position, but compared to the position of a year ago - when we were ploughing out hundreds a month more than we were bringing in, had no idea what our debt level was and basically were making no effort to control things - it all feels a lot more secure and safe. We have discussed our situation repeatedly, and broadly accepted that given the choice of (a) attempt serious frugal living like many here manage, give up after a month and maintain debt level (this has always been our previous tactic). or (b) go for a slower approach, start accruing an emergency fund as and when things allow, fully aware that if the proverbial you know what hits the fan, we will just have to use the credit cards and then enter a DMP when repayments become unmanageable, then option (b) is the one that currently works best for us. I'm not saying that will be the case forever, but even through huge changes in plan (no childcare available) and my big health scare a couple of months ago, our mindset hasn't particularly changed.

    Which is a long winded way of saying that's exactly my point - for us, the lightbulb isn't be where others think it should, and it might be that we end up in crisis, but the monthly victory of reducing debt is sufficient, and better than the alternative, for us. Of course, we are hoping that my income level rises over the coming 12 months when DC3 starts preschool, which will cause things to naturally improve anyway (emergency fund and more debt payments), so our mindset may well shift yet again if that doesn't come to fruition.
    67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017/DFD: 58,608.13/1st Dec 2026
    debt on 6th June 17/DFD: 55,820.43/1st May 2025
    • debtaghh
    • By debtaghh 8th Jun 17, 11:48 AM
    • 520 Posts
    • 1,574 Thanks
    debtaghh
    I have been following your diary from the start and can't remember if I have commented but wanted to say I completely understand where you are coming from as am in the same situation. My downfall is booking UK breaks but like you said the main thing is for me is that I am clearing debt and not adding to it. I know some ppl disagree but like you said this diary is about you and you are clearing debt so that surely is something.
    .
    • enthusiasticsaver
    • By enthusiasticsaver 8th Jun 17, 11:53 AM
    • 3,664 Posts
    • 6,577 Thanks
    enthusiasticsaver
    Interesting thoughts and for the record I would choose quality over quantity each time. We save for them though.

    I think the joy is not necessarily through being frugal per se but knowing you have financial security, whether that is low or no debt, a mortgage free house, well funded pensions, money saved for nice holidays, helping out your kids or a new car or house.

    That is the shift of mentality, the acceptance that you only buy what you can afford and you use your own money not debt and knowing that whatever life throws at you at least you are financially prepared for it. Aiming for that at the end of the journey was the motivation for us.
    Debt and mortgage free and saving for early retirement
    • zippygeorgeandben
    • By zippygeorgeandben 8th Jun 17, 11:59 AM
    • 568 Posts
    • 661 Thanks
    zippygeorgeandben
    Treadingonplaymobil - yes I see your point about LBMs... is there a link between LBMs and then turning every light off in your house to save electricity.. is that why it's called a LBM?!
    I'm with you at this moment into my journey, I'm about 9 months into mine and maybe I see it similar to dieting. I start off being really ruthless (no carbs, no treats etc) and then maybe I get worn down by it all.
    I'm with you on the debts though, as long as it's going down it's progress. Some would say that the more you can throw at your debt, the quicker you will be debt free and this is correct but not everyone can do that every month.
    If you were back here in 6 months time and the debt is going back up, then I think people are warrented in looking at your diary, wagging their finger and going 'tut tut tut', you might then look at these current posts and think 'Hmm'. Who knows what the future holds eh?!
    Quick scenario for you, my debts yes are going down. I LOVE KATY PERRY. Tickets went on sale today. Last time I saw her I paid 100 per ticket only to have my view completely obstructed by 5 teenage girls who wouldn't sit down at all. Wasn't a great experience and my partner has vowed never to give the O2 arena money ever again. it still rankles with him now.
    Anyway, I'm considering paying the top whack for tickets in a standing area in the best place possible, you get loads of extras as well. This costs 300 per ticket. I get it, it's ALOT of money 600 for 2 tickets for a show but it's next June, this is when our birthdays are and I'm still reducing my debts.
    I'm rabbling here but what I'm saying is that if you know that you can still get your debts down and want to buy the odd thing and not go crazy, then go for it. You don't need me to patronize and tell you of the pitfalls and the potential slippery slope...

    Or do you?!
    End Sep 2016 End June 2017
    8236.57 5989.54
    (Tesco 4.8%) 222.61pcm
    6185.75 1165.92 (Zopa 4.0%) 62.25pcm

    5344.50
    3170.04 (Sainsburys 0% until 06/19) 71.32pcm
    2000.00 1600.01 (Sister 0%) 133.33pcm

    Total debt
    19.766.82 13,505.42 Original DFD May 2019.
    • enthusiasticsaver
    • By enthusiasticsaver 8th Jun 17, 12:04 PM
    • 3,664 Posts
    • 6,577 Thanks
    enthusiasticsaver
    Option b sounds ok to me too. You do have to live, just within your means and as long as the debt is going down and not up then this is the aim. You choose the pace as it is your life. You will get there in the end if you stick to this mantra.
    Debt and mortgage free and saving for early retirement
    • Kantankrus Mare
    • By Kantankrus Mare 8th Jun 17, 5:03 PM
    • 4,625 Posts
    • 9,986 Thanks
    Kantankrus Mare
    I read your thread every day and am amazed at your energy and capacity for getting through some of your to do lists.

    You ARE doing well as the amount owed is going down and I think it took great courage to admit how you feel about the lightbulb situation.

    Life is short and whilst I appreciate some on here do.........it makes a pretty miserable life to be scrimping and scraping ALL the time.

    As long as you are aware that if you take your eye off the ball for any length of time, you end up back to square one....if not worse.

    I think your lightbulb is flickering on enough for you to realise that though and you WILL get there! Just taking the longer route.
    Make 10 a day challenge Jan/215.84/ Feb 146.45/ Mar 192.55/Apr 171.20/ May 156.40/june 95.55/ Jul 314.35
    Walk 2000 miles in 2017....1115.99 miles
    • hex2
    • By hex2 8th Jun 17, 5:31 PM
    • 4,669 Posts
    • 79,491 Thanks
    hex2
    Delurking to say that if I had to have a 'hairy shirt of debt suffering' it would be of finest cashmere in a really pretty colour. I'd work out the pence per wear and enjoy every moment of it.

    Absolutely get where you are coming from. The difference LBM made for me is that now that I would put thought and effort into which cashmere hairy shirt, and buy at the best possible price rather than buying three, in an already high spend month, and then not wear two of them because I wasn't sure about the colour!
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need' Marcus Tullius Cicero
    • mummytogirls
    • By mummytogirls 8th Jun 17, 8:28 PM
    • 5,226 Posts
    • 15,316 Thanks
    mummytogirls
    Totally in agree-ance (if thats even a word?!) with your LBM post TOPM xx
    Mummytogirls x

    23164.32 - 12/12/10
    7586.76 - 31/05/17 - 67.25% paid off
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 8th Jun 17, 8:32 PM
    • 756 Posts
    • 6,187 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    Thanks for all the comments about the LBM post. It's something that I've been thinking about over the past few days as I've had a little time to read others' diaries, and it really struck me how different the motivation and methodology is across the different diaries.

    Another couple of work enquiries today - if they all come off I'll be able to rebuild the majority of my business account cushion over the next month or so. I find about 50% of enquiries actually turn into bookings though, so I won't hold my breath!

    KantankrusMare, your comment about my lists made me laugh - I only include about a third of my day's lists on here, as it would be insane to include everything - I literally cannot get through the day without a list. I do write everything on it though, things most people probably manage without needing a list!

    Had to manage the DCs alone this afternoon/evening as DH is away, but made the most of it by getting them to use up loads of crafty kits and activity books - double win as it doesn't feel like wasted money having them sitting there, and I can throw out all the packaging and stuff cluttering up my shelves! <and possibly the crafty tat itself once the DCs have forgotten about it>

    to do today:
    1. Tidy and declutter the utility room, which has become a bit of a dumping ground. Did a little bit of this, cleared the space around the washing machines and the top of the machine (where all things get dumped on the way in from the back garden, as it's near the back door), but didn't get into the main bit of the utility room. Will add it to tomorrow's list.
    2. Knit a little more of the socks for my mum's birthday present - cheapest present ever, as they are using up loads of leftover scraps of yarn. They look bonkers, but my mum is v frugal and will appreciate the sentiment! Nothing done on these today, my DCs actually wanted entertaining after school, darn them!
    3. Plan budget Father's Day gift/activity. Have been having a think about this and no real inspiration is striking.
    4. Find the receipt for the silk shirt to return tomorrow. Done.
    5. Check whether we have any more homemade candles, and whether I need to order essential oils to make more if not. Forgot this, will do tomorrow.
    6. Go through the DC's Lego Sainsbury's cards and attempt to swap with a friend to get them the few missing ones - I keep doing more of my shop than necessary at Sainsbury's (rather than Lidl) to get maximum Lego cards. Will be glad when this ends next week, I totally gave in to pester power on it. Done. Have a couple of friends to message for swaps.
    7. Redo menu plan. In theory it runs out today, but we seem to have tons of food leftover, so I'm going to try to eke it out over the weekend with just a top up of milk and fruit. Done, and pleasingly I think we can get through until Monday only needing to buy 4 pints of milk, some butter and some apples and oranges. Ace.

    to do this week:
    1. finish painting the pickets for the front fence. have managed a few more, hoping to get another batch done tomorrow
    2. plan June's working time (still haven't 'gone back' to work thanks to half term). Done!
    3. roughly plan out summer working time (i.e. where I can squeeze in the odd hour while the DC are on holiday).
    4. apply for new 0% balance transfer card. Done, accepted, DFD recalculated.
    5. research utilities providers - I suspect we can move again and save a little bit. Done. No real saving, but have avoided a price rise.
    67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017/DFD: 58,608.13/1st Dec 2026
    debt on 6th June 17/DFD: 55,820.43/1st May 2025
    • zippygeorgeandben
    • By zippygeorgeandben 8th Jun 17, 8:47 PM
    • 568 Posts
    • 661 Thanks
    zippygeorgeandben
    I've got past the Katy Perry ticket thing now and have my eyes on some BOSE noise cancelling headphones today...
    End Sep 2016 End June 2017
    8236.57 5989.54
    (Tesco 4.8%) 222.61pcm
    6185.75 1165.92 (Zopa 4.0%) 62.25pcm

    5344.50
    3170.04 (Sainsburys 0% until 06/19) 71.32pcm
    2000.00 1600.01 (Sister 0%) 133.33pcm

    Total debt
    19.766.82 13,505.42 Original DFD May 2019.
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 9th Jun 17, 5:33 AM
    • 756 Posts
    • 6,187 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    I've got past the Katy Perry ticket thing now and have my eyes on some BOSE noise cancelling headphones today...
    Originally posted by zippygeorgeandben
    My diary is going to become the MSE version of a den of iniquity, isn't it?!
    67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017/DFD: 58,608.13/1st Dec 2026
    debt on 6th June 17/DFD: 55,820.43/1st May 2025
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 9th Jun 17, 5:47 AM
    • 756 Posts
    • 6,187 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    Week 17: day 6

    Gosh, an exciting morning! I threw myself out of bed at 4:30am to check results. Interested to see how things develop in terms of coalition talks.

    Going to local city today (with DC3) to return my faulty shirt (I hate doing things like this, feel like the shop will think I have washed it wrong and am trying my luck. Wish me luck standing up for myself) so will inevitably spend some money on parking, but need to find something to pull together for a packed lunch so I don't spend any extra. Not sure what we have, but I can quickly make some tortilla wraps this morning to throw some leftovers into.

    to do today:
    1. Try again to tidy and declutter the utility room, which has become a bit of a dumping ground.
    2. Knit a little more of the socks for my mum's birthday present.
    3. Plan budget Father's Day gift/activity. Have been having a think about this and no real inspiration is striking.
    4. Check whether we have any more homemade candles, and whether I need to order essential oils to make more if not.
    5. Magic a picnic out of thin air to take out with DC3 today.
    6. Make the most of the unexpected forecast sunshine and get laundry out on the line before heading out.
    7. Check DC1's cub camp packing list and see if we need to plan on buying anything.

    to do this week:
    1. finish painting the pickets for the front fence. have managed a few more, hoping to get another batch done tomorrow
    2. plan June's working time (still haven't 'gone back' to work thanks to half term). Done!
    3. roughly plan out summer working time (i.e. where I can squeeze in the odd hour while the DC are on holiday).
    4. apply for new 0% balance transfer card. Done, accepted, DFD recalculated.
    5. research utilities providers - I suspect we can move again and save a little bit. Done. No real saving, but have avoided a price rise.
    67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017/DFD: 58,608.13/1st Dec 2026
    debt on 6th June 17/DFD: 55,820.43/1st May 2025
    • enthusiasticsaver
    • By enthusiasticsaver 9th Jun 17, 10:49 AM
    • 3,664 Posts
    • 6,577 Thanks
    enthusiasticsaver
    Definitely interesting times politically.
    Debt and mortgage free and saving for early retirement
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 9th Jun 17, 2:15 PM
    • 756 Posts
    • 6,187 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    Yay, got a refund on faulty shirt. Doesn't give us any spare money, but does at least correct the overspends from last weekend before I changed my 'problem' kitty areas into weekly budgets.

    Managed to only spend 4 on parking and 10.50 on new teaspoons (what DOES happen to teaspoons?), resisted splurging on cheap clothes in H&M and on new mugs in John Lewis (I hate our mugs). Go me.
    67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017/DFD: 58,608.13/1st Dec 2026
    debt on 6th June 17/DFD: 55,820.43/1st May 2025
    • Purplemumof2
    • By Purplemumof2 9th Jun 17, 2:37 PM
    • 4,726 Posts
    • 15,132 Thanks
    Purplemumof2
    Yay to the refund!!

    We lose teaspoons too, so annoying!
    Official DFW Nerd Club - Member no. 791 - Proud to be dealing with my debts
    MBNA: 7650.00 Cap 1: 400.00 Overdraft: 2750.00

    Lunches to work 7/20 ~ 10pw 3/4

    20p Savers 2017 2 Savers 2017 50p Savers 2017 SPC 10 2017 #003
    • Hiddenidenity
    • By Hiddenidenity 9th Jun 17, 3:03 PM
    • 3,806 Posts
    • 15,111 Thanks
    Hiddenidenity
    Refund

    10.50 on teaspoons just to lose them again

    DFW 733.71/7348.71
    Rent Arrears 346.28/3381.28

    June 17 PA 121.25 + 70 Cash + 50 Amazon
    July 17 PA 216.52 + 25 Cash + 45 Amazon
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