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  • FIRST POST
    • annab275
    • By annab275 5th Feb 17, 1:20 PM
    • 44Posts
    • 210Thanks
    annab275
    Landlord wants to put the rent up
    • #1
    • 5th Feb 17, 1:20 PM
    Landlord wants to put the rent up 5th Feb 17 at 1:20 PM
    in 2014 we had a letter from our letting agents to say that the landlord had agreed to a rent freeze for five years. It currently stands at £695. In the last couple of months the shower cubicle was changed as the old one from the 1970's was rusting and falling to bits. At the same time, the fridge freezer (over 20 years old) was replaced as this too was rusting and the seals had broken. We have recently had a letter to say the landlord has proposed a rent increase to £725 a month. I can't help thinking it is because he has had to pay for this work to be done.
    Also there is no EPC on the property. I have requested one and I suspect as it is such an old property with blown double glazing, no insulation etc. it will be on the lower end of the scale. We love the location in the middle of the countryside and we were willing to put up with the outdated fixtures and fittings, but we feel it is unfair for the landlord to suddenly demand a rent increase. We cannot appeal to the landlord direct as he lives abroad, and deal directly with the agents. After a house inspection yesterday, the agent felt we were right to challenge the increase but is there anything more we can do? we have always paid the rent on time and treat the property like our own home and feel we are being unfairly treated given that there are some nightmare tenants out there!
    must say NO to impulse buys!

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Page 2
    • Arleen
    • By Arleen 5th Feb 17, 4:30 PM
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    Arleen
    Very few (if any) landlords would offer a 5 year AST and the tenant would be tying themselves to paying 5 years rent even if they chose/had to move.
    Originally posted by MyOnlyPost
    Absolutely, but then how many landlords offer 5 years fixed rent terms?
    • sparky130a
    • By sparky130a 5th Feb 17, 5:50 PM
    • 439 Posts
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    sparky130a
    I would hazard a guess the landlord is trying to increase the rent to mitigate costs arising from recent government legislation, none of which would have been on the statute books when your agreement was signed (not your problem of course). I think in the circumstances you are entitled to fight for the agreement you have and try to enforce it as best you can. The landlord however is able to serve notice to end your tenancy without breaching that agreement



    Very few (if any) landlords would offer a 5 year AST and the tenant would be tying themselves to paying 5 years rent even if they chose/had to move.
    Originally posted by MyOnlyPost
    Let's be honest, the whole concept is bonkers from the point of view of both parties.

    The LL is remiss if they ignore the fact they can't control the RPI and therefore suffer massive potential losses.

    The tenant because the local rental market could change and as you point out they are committed for 5 years.

    In rental that's bat cr^p crazy.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 5th Feb 17, 7:16 PM
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    FBaby
    In the end, it all comes down to what you get for your money. It would be logical that if you thought you could get a nicer property for the rent he is asking to increase, I expect it would be you giving him notice. If however you are getting a good deal because say you get a 3 bed property where otherwise for the same rent, you would only get a 2 bed and you really need that 3rd bed, then I expect you have to accept that it comes at the cost of lack of refurbishment.
    • rjwr
    • By rjwr 5th Feb 17, 7:47 PM
    • 123 Posts
    • 79 Thanks
    rjwr
    You are not being unfairly treated. This is a business negotiation.



    As a landlord I would start by sacking this agent.
    Originally posted by Miss Samantha

    i call this exploitation. not business.
    • leespot
    • By leespot 5th Feb 17, 7:48 PM
    • 429 Posts
    • 307 Thanks
    leespot
    It is a business. Labelling it exploitation is your opinion on that particular business.
    • rjwr
    • By rjwr 5th Feb 17, 7:53 PM
    • 123 Posts
    • 79 Thanks
    rjwr
    You are caught between a rock and a hard place. Remember the agent works for the landlord and not you, as per the post by "miss Samantha", who i'm sure is a very happy and content person who sounds like someone who uses the term "portfolio" on a regular basis........*


    I would take advice from an organisation like shelter or similar. If the landlord lives abroad then it is quite possible he/she is riding on the back of the baby boomers so needs the income from you to live elsewhere, If their costs have gone up, that affects their living so in turn they put it back on to you......

    *making lots of sweeping statements makes for entertaining reading.
    • Miss Samantha
    • By Miss Samantha 5th Feb 17, 7:54 PM
    • 1,107 Posts
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    Miss Samantha
    i call this exploitation. not business.
    Originally posted by rjwr
    A small rent increase after 3 years is nothing like exploitation...

    You would probably be unhappy to receive a comparable salary increase. Are you exploiting your employer?
    • rjwr
    • By rjwr 5th Feb 17, 8:00 PM
    • 123 Posts
    • 79 Thanks
    rjwr
    It is a business. Labelling it exploitation is your opinion on that particular business.
    Originally posted by leespot
    I agree its my opinion, but equally its you're opinion that it is a business, something I strongly disagree with.

    Again, my opinion, labeling renting a house out as a business is just another way that those who wish to do this can provide some form of self justification for their actions.

    The real good news is, in the one house I have mortgaged, I go to sleep at night happy that i'm not contributing to this country's housing problem,
    • rjwr
    • By rjwr 5th Feb 17, 8:08 PM
    • 123 Posts
    • 79 Thanks
    rjwr
    A small rent increase after 3 years is nothing like exploitation...

    You would probably be unhappy to receive a comparable salary increase. Are you exploiting your employer?
    Originally posted by Miss Samantha
    My employer is in a position of power, as would be the landlord. So your question should be, "you would be unhappy to receive a comparable salary decrease."

    Yes would be the answer to that question,

    The tenant has no control over the rent, well actually they can move, so lets get this straight, pay up or move out. Exploitation.

    It depends on someones meaning of "small increase."

    OP - move out and let the landlord find another tenant. You come across like a nice person and a good tenant. Lets hope your landlord enjoys the "small increase", oh yea, someone needs to pay the rent for that happen.
    Easily forgotten how good reliable tenants are hard to find...................
    • alfred64
    • By alfred64 5th Feb 17, 9:14 PM
    • 3,505 Posts
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    alfred64
    'Please find enclosed a Section 13 Notice in respect of the above property with a rent increase proposal to £695.00 per calendar month to commence 7th March 2014. The landlord is willing to guarantee a 5 year freeze at £695.00 from the above date'.
    Originally posted by annab275

    So what exactly is this guarantee worth?


    I could not go back on my word, let alone if I gave a guarantee.
    That is me, however.
    • annab275
    • By annab275 5th Feb 17, 9:19 PM
    • 44 Posts
    • 210 Thanks
    annab275
    I get that we are living in a supply and demand world and a few years ago we had our own home, an affordable mortgage but my partner was made redundant and I had to give up work to look after my sick daughter, who later passed away. We sold the house and paid off debts and found ourselves in the rental market. I shall be collecting my pension in a few weeks, but shall carry on working for myself as I do not wish to be supported by the state. I may be just another statistic in the dire housing crisis that this country faces, but the truth is some bad luck along the way can force destitution and homelessness. My dad used to be a landlord - bought property, rented it out and he had plenty of problem tenants, who sublet, trashed houses etc. I feel there needs to be more give and take. I have no objection to rent rises in line with inflation but these market forces can be very cruel, and it may be a business to landlords but in the same way energy and utility companies work, you have to have a roof over your head and the ability to keep warm.
    must say NO to impulse buys!

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    • G_M
    • By G_M 5th Feb 17, 9:45 PM
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    G_M
    'Please find enclosed a Section 13 Notice in respect of the above property with a rent increase proposal to £695.00 per calendar month to commence 7th March 2014. The landlord is willing to guarantee a 5 year freeze at £695.00 from the above date'.
    So what exactly is this guarantee worth?

    I could not go back on my word, let alone if I gave a guarantee.
    That is me, however.
    Originally posted by alfred64
    In legal terms I don't believe this guarantee is worth anything.

    * it is incorprated within a S13 Notice which is a statutory notice. The terms are therefore as defined by the relevant statute (Housing Act 1988). This prohibits a further rent increase via a S13 for a period of a year, but allows it thereafter. So a new S13 Notice with a new rent could be served a year later.

    * arguably the guarantee could be said to be part of the contract, but
    - I have never come across a periodic contract with rent fixed for a term longer than the relevant periods (ie as here, monthly periods but a 5 year rent guarantee)
    - to be contractual, there would need to have been an offer, and an acceptance. In this case, the S13 Notice was not an offer, it was a notice of a rent increase which the tenant had no choice to accept or refuse

    * Even if it were a contractual, statute overules contract, so the LL could sill rely on the statute to serve a new S13 12 months later

    There is clearly a moral dimension - the LL did (unwisely) make a promise, but one would have to put that into context. If other factors have changed since the promise was made, that might justify changing the terms of the promise.
    • MyOnlyPost
    • By MyOnlyPost 5th Feb 17, 9:53 PM
    • 1,510 Posts
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    MyOnlyPost
    The real good news is, in the one house I have mortgaged, I go to sleep at night happy that i'm not contributing to this country's housing problem,
    Originally posted by rjwr
    House prices have been on the up for years, fuelled by excessive lending and the desire of the Conservative governement of the 1980's for everybody to own a home. If anything it is being able to borrow money too easily through mortgages that has caused the housing crisis over 30+ years. Of course for the past 2-3 years all anyone in governemnt has said is, ooh landlords are pushing up house prices. Sections of the public believe this is the root cause, when the blame lies with the systemic under investment in council and social housing, the ridiculous right to buy scheme selling off council stock at hugely reduced prices (from which my parents benefitted) combined with the ever burgeoning population. The government is like a magician using a pretty assistant to distract your foucs from where it should be.

    Thought exercise: If you had to save up to buy a house rather than were able to borrow against future income, what would be the current state of house prices? How many people would own a house and how many would be renting? Even if houses were free, if there aren't enough to satisfy demand some people would still be without housing.
    It may sometimes seem like I can't spell, I can, I just can't type
    • mattyprice4004
    • By mattyprice4004 6th Feb 17, 12:07 AM
    • 3,403 Posts
    • 2,799 Thanks
    mattyprice4004
    I agree its my opinion, but equally its you're opinion that it is a business, something I strongly disagree with.

    Again, my opinion, labeling renting a house out as a business is just another way that those who wish to do this can provide some form of self justification for their actions.

    The real good news is, in the one house I have mortgaged, I go to sleep at night happy that i'm not contributing to this country's housing problem,
    Originally posted by rjwr
    The landlord has invested money into a house to then let it out to tenants - he's doing it for the money.

    Whichever way you look at it, those who let houses to tenants are running a business. That's not an opinion, that is fact.
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    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 6th Feb 17, 6:34 AM
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    FBaby
    I may be just another statistic in the dire housing crisis that this country faces, but the truth is some bad luck along the way can force destitution and homelessness
    I am sorry for your situation, and indeed, bad luck can hit anyone anytime but do you know that your LL is crawling in cash, enjoying counting every pound he makes in profit, whilst getting pleasure at the prospect of getting another £25 a month that he will spend getting a few beers at his golf club?

    Maybe he is abroad to look family members and maybe he can only just make do with the income he receives. Maybe after he paid for the repairs in the house, he didn't have any money to pay to repair his own boiler?

    We can make many assumptions, and the one that LLs are all enjoying a fantastic life exploiting tenants is a common one. The reality is often quite different.
    • rjwr
    • By rjwr 6th Feb 17, 7:32 PM
    • 123 Posts
    • 79 Thanks
    rjwr
    The landlord has invested money into a house to then let it out to tenants - he's doing it for the money.

    Whichever way you look at it, those who let houses to tenants are running a business. That's not an opinion, that is fact.
    Originally posted by mattyprice4004
    same as sex trafficking thats also a business, just not a legal one.
    both exploit vulnerable people.

    so after sounding like a troll, my point still stands, whichever way you want to label renting out a house and taking away a home from someone, its still exploitation.
    • mije1983
    • By mije1983 6th Feb 17, 8:15 PM
    • 2,313 Posts
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    mije1983
    whichever way you want to label renting out a house and taking away a home from someone, its still exploitation.
    Originally posted by rjwr
    So you would ban renting if you could then? What about people who have no wish to own their own home? Where would they live?

    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 6th Feb 17, 8:22 PM
    • 13,228 Posts
    • 11,574 Thanks
    AdrianC
    whichever way you want to label renting out a house and taking away a home from someone, its still exploitation.
    Originally posted by rjwr
    Umm, isn't the rented property still somebody's home?
    • rjwr
    • By rjwr 20th Mar 17, 8:57 PM
    • 123 Posts
    • 79 Thanks
    rjwr
    So you would ban renting if you could then? What about people who have no wish to own their own home? Where would they live?
    Originally posted by mije1983
    Show me those people and ill point them in the direction of the government.
    • rjwr
    • By rjwr 20th Mar 17, 9:00 PM
    • 123 Posts
    • 79 Thanks
    rjwr
    So you would ban renting if you could then? What about people who have no wish to own their own home? Where would they live?
    Originally posted by mije1983
    Umm, isn't the rented property still somebody's home?
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    nope never..... unless you have been someone who has had to rent a house you will never know. As a renter it is NEVER your home. EVER,

    landlords justify what they do by claiming they are providing homes for other people. It is exactly the opposite of what they are doing.
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