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  • FIRST POST
    • RedEars57
    • By RedEars57 21st Jan 17, 11:23 AM
    • 1Posts
    • 0Thanks
    RedEars57
    GreenSpace / Thermotec replacement conservatory roof
    • #1
    • 21st Jan 17, 11:23 AM
    GreenSpace / Thermotec replacement conservatory roof 21st Jan 17 at 11:23 AM
    Hello all,

    I have a 17 year old victorian style conservatory with a polycarbonate roof, approx. 3.6M x 4.5M, 9 polycarbonate panels.

    Usual problems of too cold in winter, too hot in summer. So I was looking at replacement roof options. I understand about needing planning permission, loading on the structure etc., so not so concerned about feedback on those areas

    Whilst looking I came across the Thermotec option, enquired and had the 90 minute sales pitch from one of their resellers GreenSpace

    The product theory sounds ok, very low U value, slight concern that they look ugly, but I guess they do the job. However the price seemed ridiculous to me. I was expecting £5 to £6K as they emphasise fitting is quick and easy, and no planning permission needed. I was told that list was around £12K, but with discount it could be £9.5K.

    Does anyone have any feedback on this option?

    I also need to replace some windows so I will be looking at £10.5 to £11K.

    I am in a Southampton SO postcode so any thoughts on other options or local installers would be useful. Obviously I want to avoid the "overcladding" option. It is a new roof I want, but there seems to be a lot of variation in quality on these and the price range again is £10 to 12K.

    I have looked at replacement conservatories with an Active Glass roof from Conservatoryonlineprices and for an existing base they are quoting up to £9K, or £5 to £6K for a new glass roof (but I anticipate there will be some strengthening needed so extra cost).

    Does anyone have any thoughts on a glass roof option? Do they leave you with the same internal temperature issues as polycarbonate?

    Is it just me or does it seem mad that a new conservatory is less than a new roof?
    Last edited by RedEars57; 21-01-2017 at 11:32 AM.
Page 1
    • phil24_7
    • By phil24_7 21st Jan 17, 12:49 PM
    • 1,520 Posts
    • 662 Thanks
    phil24_7
    • #2
    • 21st Jan 17, 12:49 PM
    • #2
    • 21st Jan 17, 12:49 PM
    I would stay away from ANY company that gave £2.5K discount. It means their initial price is hogwash and their second quote is also likely to be questionable! These are terrible practices used by cowboys to real the gullible in!
    • Wheatley1968
    • By Wheatley1968 11th Jul 17, 4:46 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Wheatley1968
    • #3
    • 11th Jul 17, 4:46 PM
    Hard Selling Dishonest
    • #3
    • 11th Jul 17, 4:46 PM
    I agree with phil24_7, I have sent you a private message RedEars57
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 11th Jul 17, 5:13 PM
    • 24,207 Posts
    • 67,008 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 17, 5:13 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Jul 17, 5:13 PM
    I have a real problem with the idea of these roofs.

    Conservatories do not have to meet building regulations and so these companies are free to make whatever claims they want to without actually meeting any building regulations. The cost is more than that of a fully compliant roof on a proper extension, but doesn't meet the required u-value of a roof.

    I would not be investing such money on something which is non-compliant, on a 17 year old structure which is not designed to be permanent and is not built on proper foundations.
    Last edited by Doozergirl; 11-07-2017 at 5:18 PM.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 11th Jul 17, 5:58 PM
    • 3,723 Posts
    • 2,350 Thanks
    Furts
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 17, 5:58 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Jul 17, 5:58 PM
    MiL has a conservatory with a tinted glass roof with easy clean glass. It receives direct sun, though it is not south facing. It does not over heat, but it was designed with adequate ventilation and to act as a thermal mass. The floor slab and the bungalow walls soak up the heat and any excess goes back into the bungalow which also soaks it up.


    This conservatory will be vastly better than OP's with proper foundations, proper dwarf insulated walls, proper insulated floor slab, and the latest standard of double glazed units. This was built without great efforts to keep costs down. But all in it came at around £9000. To put this into perspective, it makes OP's prices for a roof look extortionate, or absurd, or both.


    I second Doozergirl. Conservatories are short life, temporary structures, sold at extortionate prices, through unregulated sales channels, devoid of almost any regulation, and all too frequently outright bodged.


    No way would I be spending circa £10000 to re roof a life expired 17 year old conservatory.
    • A Wright-Burke
    • By A Wright-Burke 28th Nov 17, 4:50 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    A Wright-Burke
    • #6
    • 28th Nov 17, 4:50 PM
    Wow.
    • #6
    • 28th Nov 17, 4:50 PM
    Sorry for dragging up an old thread but I felt compelled to respond after trawling the t'internet for some reviews on roof companies.
    Having recently ( 2 years ago) knocked through into our conservatory to create an open plan kitchen diner, I thought I maybe well placed to answer some of the misinformed or misunderstood replies above.
    Firstly, a conservatory isn't a temporary structure is defined as something that will stand for no more than 28 days from a planning perspective nor is it considered short life, the framework and glazing has the same expected lifespan as many other components used in construction. A temporary structure doesn't require foundations for a start and if the door security and efficiency is considered external quality and the dwarf walls have cavity insulation, then building control approval is very easy to obtain as long as you can prove it has the necessary requirements fitted. We changed our glazing on the walls and door to Argon filled, showed the building control guy the build specification sheet that came when the conservatory was fitted and the certificate was forthcoming, very quickly and without fuss.
    For us, the cost of knocking it down and starting again was cost prohibitive and this was the best ( and only) option open to us.
    We left the glass roof alone because funds didn't allow us to change it at that point but I'd convinced myself that solar reflective glass would do it's job! Of course it didn't, candles still melted and everything in the dining room was bleached on one side, so now I am looking for the best option to insulate and block out the light, hence my internet trawl.
    I agree in that these roof conversions look expensive but for us, it will have a purpose and not just because we are gullible, clueless folk that have got nothing better to spend our money on.

    I am also aware that something similar 25 years ago may have been pennies in relation to today's cost but my wages have increased greatly since then and so has the value of the house so I'm prepared to believe some of the quotes I get are relative to my gains over the years.
    Furts. Sometimes life moves on and options are developed. These solid roofs are one of them.
    Many thanks AWB
    • Furts
    • By Furts 29th Nov 17, 8:28 AM
    • 3,723 Posts
    • 2,350 Thanks
    Furts
    • #7
    • 29th Nov 17, 8:28 AM
    • #7
    • 29th Nov 17, 8:28 AM
    Sorry for dragging up an old thread but I felt compelled to respond after trawling the t'internet for some reviews on roof companies.
    Having recently ( 2 years ago) knocked through into our conservatory to create an open plan kitchen diner, I thought I maybe well placed to answer some of the misinformed or misunderstood replies above.
    Firstly, a conservatory isn't a temporary structure is defined as something that will stand for no more than 28 days from a planning perspective nor is it considered short life, the framework and glazing has the same expected lifespan as many other components used in construction. A temporary structure doesn't require foundations for a start and if the door security and efficiency is considered external quality and the dwarf walls have cavity insulation, then building control approval is very easy to obtain as long as you can prove it has the necessary requirements fitted. We changed our glazing on the walls and door to Argon filled, showed the building control guy the build specification sheet that came when the conservatory was fitted and the certificate was forthcoming, very quickly and without fuss.
    For us, the cost of knocking it down and starting again was cost prohibitive and this was the best ( and only) option open to us.
    We left the glass roof alone because funds didn't allow us to change it at that point but I'd convinced myself that solar reflective glass would do it's job! Of course it didn't, candles still melted and everything in the dining room was bleached on one side, so now I am looking for the best option to insulate and block out the light, hence my internet trawl.
    I agree in that these roof conversions look expensive but for us, it will have a purpose and not just because we are gullible, clueless folk that have got nothing better to spend our money on.

    I am also aware that something similar 25 years ago may have been pennies in relation to today's cost but my wages have increased greatly since then and so has the value of the house so I'm prepared to believe some of the quotes I get are relative to my gains over the years.
    Furts. Sometimes life moves on and options are developed. These solid roofs are one of them.
    Many thanks AWB
    Originally posted by A Wright-Burke
    Your money and your choice how you spend it. You are happy so fine by me. I disagree with your comments about short life structures, but no point getting into a slanging match here.

    The thread is titled Greenspace and Thermotec, which conjour up images of snake oil straight away. Regardless, if you go ahead on a replacement roof I would offer a personal opinion. These roofs look grotesque - carbuncle is a term that comes to mind. Think carefully about these roofs blighting your home. A mock tile or slate appearance is preferable for the majority of homes.
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 29th Nov 17, 1:09 PM
    • 2,977 Posts
    • 1,698 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #8
    • 29th Nov 17, 1:09 PM
    • #8
    • 29th Nov 17, 1:09 PM
    FWIW we paid £500 to have UV film applied to our conservatory roof. I was skeptical but it has worked to an extent.

    Primarily it has largely removed the glare which was so bad before you needed sunglasses and does seem to have been successful in blocking out UV light.

    In terms of cooling it brought the average temperature down from an unusable 40C in the height of summer (south facing) to an uncomfortable but usable 30C. We may get some solar blinds for the front windows next year which might reduce the heat a bit more.

    The conservatory was here when we bought the house, I wouldn’t have one by choice and I wouldn’t spend any more than we did on reducing heat, glare and UV. I certainly wouldn’t spend a fortune on a proper roof which I’d imagine would just make it dull and gloomy.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 29th Nov 17, 2:48 PM
    • 23,942 Posts
    • 90,111 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #9
    • 29th Nov 17, 2:48 PM
    • #9
    • 29th Nov 17, 2:48 PM
    Having recently ( 2 years ago) knocked through into our conservatory to create an open plan kitchen diner, I thought I maybe well placed to answer some of the misinformed or misunderstood replies above.
    Originally posted by A Wright-Burke
    You are certainly entitled to your own view, just as the posters who you're attempting to correct are entitled to theirs.

    Unfortunately for you, some of those posters have a wealth of up to date practical experience on which to draw, so your 'answers' as a relatively inexperienced person. have to be seen in that context.

    Your opening paragraph was enough for me, however. If it was up for sale, I wouldn't be buying your house, except at a massive discount. I wouldn't want a mash-up of conservatory and house; in winter, summer, or any time in between.

    I say this as someone who has a 25m2 conservatory on the back of my property, currently with its doors still wide open because it's feeding free heat into the rest of the building as I type. However, in an hour or so that situation won't pertain, the external grade doors will close and it will revert to just back-up protection for the living room's large area of glass.

    Oh, and that glass is very important to me, as I suffer from SAD at this time of year, or I would do without the great light we enjoy here; very different from our old house. Stick an opaque roof on the conservatory and we'd lose that.

    So, no thanks to pretend sun rooms, so far as I'm concerned, but I hope you enjoy yours, when you get it.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
    • A Wright-Burke
    • By A Wright-Burke 1st Dec 17, 9:56 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    A Wright-Burke
    Morning
    Morning Dave.
    I will agree opinions are just that but my relatively "Inexperienced" view was referring to my own house,budget and situation as was the OP I recall.
    My experience or career knowledge wasn't asked for, nor did I impart it. I may not be the " newbie" in the construction industry you assume I am because I haven't indicated it in a post that didn't ask for it. I was simply stating that building control certificates are not hard or nigh on impossible to get because it is a conservatory.
    Moving on to solar radiation. I too appreciate the effect on the ground floor of the property on a bright day in November but our house or budget didn't allow us to buy a property that was large enough for us to forego the important extra floor space the conservatory has, so we need to use it all the time, not just in the day or very occasionally.
    I do also understand the importance of light if you suffer with SAD, so your situation suits you and that's good stuff!
    AWB
    • A Wright-Burke
    • By A Wright-Burke 1st Dec 17, 9:59 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    A Wright-Burke
    Morning Furts
    I am leaning to a tiled variant it has to be said with some glazing, a hybrid even.
    We shall see.
    Cheers AWB
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