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  • FIRST POST
    • ch4rly2002
    • By ch4rly2002 19th Jan 17, 2:37 PM
    • 292Posts
    • 1,232Thanks
    ch4rly2002
    Dreaming of financial freedom!
    • #1
    • 19th Jan 17, 2:37 PM
    Dreaming of financial freedom! 19th Jan 17 at 2:37 PM
    Hi everyone reading this!

    I hadn't thought about writing my own MFW diary until another user suggested it, so I have no idea if anyone will be interested in what I have to say, but I'll just post it and you can ignore if it's rubbish So here's my story...

    I turn 30 next month and I would like to be mortgage free as soon as possible. My husband and I work in IT and, at least in my company, it seems to be that most jobs are being moved abroad. My dad also worked in IT was made redundant at 53 before my parents had finished their mortgage so I think that is why I am so anxious about having mortgage debt and would like to pay it off ASAP.

    We bought our first house in 2006 and sold it three years later in the middle of the recession for a loss of £6k, which wasn't ideal but it allowed us to purchase a house we couldn't have otherwise afforded as the vendors needed a quick sale so were prepared to drop their price. We moved in to the new house at the back end of 2009 and didn't need to do anything to it, which is a good job as we didn't have any spare money at the time! After a few years I got a job that paid well and we started overpaying on the mortgage, which we decided to do rather than save up as we would get a nice lump sum if we were made redundant. I loved seeing the mortgage go down!

    In 2011 my dad was diagnosed with a progressive neurodegenerative illness, which means his brain is slowly dying and was given a life expectancy of approximately 7 years, although it differs for everyone. My parents decided to make the most of their time together and bought a static caravan by a lake, which they lived in happily for a couple of years before my dad started having too many falls to continue living there and they moved into an independent living unit near Holmfirth, which isn't too far from where my in-laws live so it made visiting them all on our weekends up from Nottingham so much easier! By 2014 my dad had deteriorated quite a bit and my husband and I discussed leaving Nottingham so we could live closer to our parents in Yorkshire. At this point, the house was valued at £170,000 and the mortgage was at £108,000. Had we stayed and continued paying the same amount each month we would be mortgage free by 2021 but if we moved we would either have to rent (which we both saw as dead money) or buy another place that would be more expensive for a comparable house so it was a difficult decision. Around the same time my father-in-law got cancer, so we decided that moving up would be the best option. The only problem was that my dad was deteriorating rapidly and it takes ages for houses in our area to sell so we'd miss the last bit of time with my dad in a reasonable condition and could miss being there for the in-laws when they needed us through the cancer treatment process. At this point, I suggested we rent out our house and buy another house closer to our parents. I first spoke to my mortgage provider and asked if there was a way to release equity from our house and move it onto a buy-to-let mortgage then purchase another property. Unfortunately they wouldn't allow us to do this, but luckily MSE sings the praises of London and Country mortgage brokers and as they don't charge a fee I thought it would be worth giving them a call. I am so glad I did! My advisor Adam found me a new residential mortgage and let-to-buy mortgage (which is apparently very similar to a buy-to-let mortgage but it is when you already owned the property when you decided to rent it out) so we could use equity from our house. A couple of months later we moved into our new house and our old house was rented out shortly after.

    After 2 years, our fixed deals have just come to an end and this is where we now stand...

    Residential mortgage:
    Started at £216,000 on 3.29% with no OPs allowed.
    From January 4th, the property has 80% LTV and is on 1.99% for 3 years with 10% OP allowed. Started at £204,000 but as I had to guess what amount I would need when I first applied 3 months ago, we were refunded £1,404 so the mortgage now stands at £202,596. The standard mortgage payment £916 but I set the DD up at £1,100 as that's what we paid before so there is an overpayment there without any hardship. I can't wait to see this go under £200k, and then I will set £10k goals.

    Buy-to-Let mortgage:
    Started at £136,000 on 4.79%, and we started making overpayments of £250pm.
    From February the property will have a 73% LTV and will be on 2.64% for 2 years. Again, we applied for this mortgage 3 months ago and I guessed £129,000 but when I checked yesterday it stood at £127,895 so we will be due some money back and will pay that off the mortgage straight away.The standard DD is £638 but I am considering whether to leave the payments at £1,000 as they previously were.

    The only fly in the ointment now is that our jobs aren't as secure as they used to be, and there are rumours of redundancy packages being dropped to statutory rates, which I understand isn't very much. This has made me think that we ought to have some savings in case one or both of us gets made redundant. We have £1500 in premium bonds saved up for house repairs but that wasn't much of a safety net. Luckily, we have just received a cheque for £4,900 from my husband's stock that he just sold so for the first time ever we finally have some security. We would have previously put it straight on the mortgage but with the current uncertainty around jobs it is nice to have a bit of a safety net. The timing couldn't be better!

    I'll be honest. I'm rubbish with budgets. I don't know how much we spend and I know I could be a lot more careful with my spending. We do have takeaways and eat out quite a bit, mainly because we both work long hours and very tired on an evening and don't want to then spend a big chunk of our evenings cooking. If I'm even more honest, part of it is laziness However, I want to change that as I'm sure we could save some real money and be healthier if we cook more so I'm thinking maybe meal plans, online shopping so I don't get tempted by add on products and don't have to give up a load of time to go to the supermarket, and maybe the odd ready meal in place of a takeaway when we're feeling tired / lazy. I am also going to have a look into slow cooker recipes that I could put on in a morning so it's ready for us as soon as we finish working.

    My goal is to start logging what we spend and make a proper budget!

    Some (limited) financial info:
    Husband earns around £3,000 net each month.
    I earn around £1,700 net each month.
    Rental income, after expenses, is £678 per month.

    Mortgage 1 £1,100
    Mortgage 2 £322 (£1,000 payment minus £678 rent, assuming we keep the payment the same)
    Car loan £500 (ends in October 2017)
    Loan to In-Laws £250 (not accruing any interest)
    Water bill £26
    Council Tax £128
    Gas & Electric £94.14
    BG Home Care £29.50
    Mobile 1 £13
    Mobile 2 £20
    Sky TV, internet and phone £70.93 (up for renewal tomorrow so will haggle or switch to Virgin)
    Car insurance £632 in 2016 (paid in a lump sum in April)
    Home insurance £491 in 2016 (paid in a lump sum in December)
    Pet insurance £69.61 in 2016 (paid in a lump sum in November)
    Landlord insurance £219.21 in 2017 (paid in a lump sum in January)
    Rent Guarantee and Legal insurance £125 in 2017 (paid in a lump sum in January)
    Gas Safety Certificate £60 (annual, paid in February)

    Unsure on food and entertainment costs (really need to get a grip on this) but after paying our credit cards we end up with between £500 and £1500 left at the end of the month, which we have recently been spending on home improvements, insurance, Christmas etc. so we haven't saved much of this. We are also thinking about joining a gym so that might also be another expense in future. If I think of any other expenses I will add them but I think that's pretty much it for now.

    I will try and update this as and when I get more information or manage to make savings / OPs. Thanks for reading!
    Last edited by ch4rly2002; 20-01-2017 at 10:44 AM. Reason: Forgot to include the current mortgage values.
Page 15
    • Kittenkirst
    • By Kittenkirst 13th Dec 17, 1:14 PM
    • 1,703 Posts
    • 9,058 Thanks
    Kittenkirst
    Jim Charley, I’ve noticed that pinecone have sent out lots this month- I’ve had three alreadywhich is way more than usual (& I’ve always had it on the unlimited setting)

    Prolific is also very slow- I’m refreshing constantly but there’s nothing there booo!

    Well done on the AVC payments on the pension- being nosey so tell me to do one if you like ;P, but what % Of salary do you contribute? I’ve been looking at pensions this year and trying to understand how much to invest vs how much to stick in LISA’s
    2018 MFW #20 - OP £391.44/ £3000 13%

    Emergency fund £4K/ £6k
    Mortgage Oct '16 £170.995 LTV 90% end: Nov 2041
    Overpayments 2016 £255.50 2017 £2600.40
    • ch4rly2002
    • By ch4rly2002 13th Dec 17, 1:59 PM
    • 292 Posts
    • 1,232 Thanks
    ch4rly2002
    Ah, so it's been a busy month in general with Pinecone. Good news for us all then

    I don't mind at all. I put in the maximum 6% standard pension that my employer matches and I also put in an additional 3% additional. I wasn't sure whether or not to increase that contribution this time round but due to my company's industry and the fact it is now effectively a new company (we split part of the company off last year and merged with a competitor to make a new company), I didn't think the pension was the safest of choices so I've stuck with 3% and invest in NS&I bonds, regular saver and mortgage overpayments as well. I guess for me and the company's situation I feel a bit more comfortable spreading my investments rather than having all my eggs in one basket. I'm curious to see how your Bitcoin investment works out though
    Savings: Aim £13.5k. Dec 2016 £1,700 / Jan 2018 £11,900
    Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£216,000 / Jan 2018 -£193,000
    BTL Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£136,000/ Jan 2018 -£123,800
    CC 0%: Nov 2016 -£4,500 / Jan 2018 -£3,402.29
    Loan to In-Laws: Sep 2010 -£48,185.82 / Jan 2018 -£30,565.49
    Student Loan: March 2011 -£18,275.04 / April 2017 -£14,003.85
    • ch4rly2002
    • By ch4rly2002 19th Dec 17, 10:00 AM
    • 292 Posts
    • 1,232 Thanks
    ch4rly2002
    As it's coming up to a year since I started on my MFW journey, I thought I'd do a quick stock check and see how everything has progressed, before we move into the new house and increase the numbers again!

    I think I am most proud of our savings achievement. In December 2016 I had a grand total of £1,700 saved up. I knew this was an area I wanted to focus on as Martin, and many others, rave on about having at least 3 months of essential bills saved up, but 6 months if you can manage it. One sentence that still haunts me is "you are only a paycheck from living on the streets". With some focus, and a bit of good luck, we've managed to smash our original savings target of £10,000 and are now sitting at £11,550. Considering how DH and I have never saved before (the most I've managed to save in the past is a couple of thousand to pay for a repair etc.) I am really proud of this. This has been achieved by setting up a direct debit with NS&I to invest £50 in premium bonds each month, setting up a regular saver of £300 per month and trying to fund that through extras like selling on eBay or putting away any money from my Grandma, and DH saved £5000 when his shares from work became payable. With the premium bonds, this is something we've wanted to invest in for a long time but we never had £100 to spare. When I found out you can invest £50 (which I heard from this forum) it has made a huge difference. Now the money comes out on payday so I don't miss it and as you can't withdraw premium bonds instantly, it doesn't feel like a bit of money I can just take out willy nilly so it will stay invested. Considering we've saved more than ever, while still overpaying on the mortgage and paying for house repairs and decoration, I am really pleased with this.

    I am also really pleased with the mortgages. In 2017 we have overpaid £2436.80 on our residential mortgage and £1041.19 on the buy-to-let mortgage.

    Some valuable knowledge, tips and advice I have learned on the forum would have to be how to make a little extra from survey sites, the importance of trying to keep up motivation to list items on eBay (and that I am not alone in struggling with that one!), that I am not the only nutter who wants to pay off their mortgage early and will try all sorts to achieve it, Tilly Tidy - that's a big one, and mainly I've enjoyed getting to know people, learning from their blogs, being able to vent some of the difficult things that have happened this year and getting support from you guys
    Savings: Aim £13.5k. Dec 2016 £1,700 / Jan 2018 £11,900
    Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£216,000 / Jan 2018 -£193,000
    BTL Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£136,000/ Jan 2018 -£123,800
    CC 0%: Nov 2016 -£4,500 / Jan 2018 -£3,402.29
    Loan to In-Laws: Sep 2010 -£48,185.82 / Jan 2018 -£30,565.49
    Student Loan: March 2011 -£18,275.04 / April 2017 -£14,003.85
    • Thistlewhistle
    • By Thistlewhistle 19th Dec 17, 12:48 PM
    • 1,032 Posts
    • 7,247 Thanks
    Thistlewhistle
    Some great achievements in 2017 there - well done.
    May your 2018 be equally as fruitful if not more so!!

    Thistle
    Mortgage at end 05/2007: £90200
    Mortgage at end 11/2017: £72436 paid £17764 (19.69%)
    MFD: Original:05/2042 Projected:04/2031 saving 133 months = 11yr 1 mth
    Car Finance: £8225 : £7535 (8.39% paid off)
    CC Debt (0% until 06/2020): £5640 : £5324 (5.60% paid off)

    Age of Money at 30/11/2017 = 34 days

    YNAB is changing the way I live my life....and spend my money!!
    • Jessy103
    • By Jessy103 20th Dec 17, 9:50 AM
    • 510 Posts
    • 2,166 Thanks
    Jessy103
    Great figures Ch4rly, well done!!! If i don't speak to you before have a fantastic Christmas and New Year! x
    Original Mortgage Amount 2007 - £87,310.50
    Mortgage Amount Jan 2018 - £58,500.00
    Overpayment Target for 2018 - £5,000 /£369.23
    Jan - £369.23
    • ch4rly2002
    • By ch4rly2002 20th Dec 17, 10:44 AM
    • 292 Posts
    • 1,232 Thanks
    ch4rly2002
    Thanks Thistle and Jessy - I hope you both have a lovely Christmas and New Year x
    Savings: Aim £13.5k. Dec 2016 £1,700 / Jan 2018 £11,900
    Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£216,000 / Jan 2018 -£193,000
    BTL Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£136,000/ Jan 2018 -£123,800
    CC 0%: Nov 2016 -£4,500 / Jan 2018 -£3,402.29
    Loan to In-Laws: Sep 2010 -£48,185.82 / Jan 2018 -£30,565.49
    Student Loan: March 2011 -£18,275.04 / April 2017 -£14,003.85
    • themadvix
    • By themadvix 20th Dec 17, 5:04 PM
    • 1,243 Posts
    • 7,477 Thanks
    themadvix
    Great figures Charly, especially considering its not been the easiest year for you - I'm not sure I'd have had the commitment under the circumstances. I'm sure your Grandma is thrilled that you've been saving the money she gives you.

    I hope you have a peaceful Christmas with your family xx
    OPs 2017 = £3103
    S&S ISA 2017 = £626
    OPs 2016 = £6142.12
    Starting balance 2012: £132000; balance Dec 2017: £96,822
    MFW2017 no. 38
    • ch4rly2002
    • By ch4rly2002 2nd Jan 18, 3:54 PM
    • 292 Posts
    • 1,232 Thanks
    ch4rly2002
    Happy New Year everyone!!

    Hope you had a good break. It was a bit of an usual one for us this year. DH and I haven't felt particularly Christmassy and didn't really decorate much so it has been different but enjoyable nonetheless.

    We kicked off the festivities with a meal out on Christmas Eve. This is a tradition that my Mum, DH and I do every year, but this year we had BIL with us too as the in-laws are still in America and we didn't want him to be alone. In previous years it was always Mum, Dad and me but for obvious reasons Dad hasn't been able to join us for the last few years, so we went and visited him in the nursing home instead. Mum paid for the meal as her Christmas present to the three of us. It was lovely (and I'd recommend The Griffin Inn to anyone who's over Halifax way) - good food and a good atmosphere, although the live singer had his speakers up a tad too high but we were nearly finished at that point so we managed to escape with our hearing intact.

    Christmas day was just the four of us again. Mum made our family's traditional Christmas meal of fillet steak with all the trimmings (including my favourites: cauliflower & brocolli in a cheese sauce and potato slices and DH's/BIL's favourite honey glazed parsnips). This is far from DH and BIL's traditional Christmas meal but we all enjoyed it. We opened our presents, visited Dad in the nursing home and had a Facetime call with the in-laws in America. Our new Nephew was wearing his Christmas present from us (a Me to You 'My First Christmas' baby grow) and we only made him cry once... we're getting better

    On Boxing Day we saw Dad again then went out for a meal in the evening. That was over in Mum's village so we took her home after the meal. It was an Indian restaurant and it was their weekly Thali night (kind of like tapas but with mini curries) and we absolutely loved it. It was great having a selection of different curries.

    Things then went a bit quiet in between, except for a visit to DH's relatives' house. They put on a buffet and we played a Christmas quiz. It was great to see them. We also took over one of Dad's old wheelchairs. It hadn't been used for long but the breaks were on the wheels so the user has to break, which he soon lost the ability to do and mum had to buy one with breaks on the handles. As DH's aunt is disabled and walks with a stick I asked if she'd like it and she was thrilled so we took that round for her, freeing up a space in the shed. I also mentioned the microwave, kettle and crock pot that my Grandma was getting rid of after updating her kitchen appliances to a matching set and she said she knows someone who has nothing but a small portable cooker type thing (it sounded like a camping cooker) so said she would love them for her. I know some charities are funny about electricals so they would most likely have ended up on Freecycle or at the tip if no-one claimed them, but now I know they're being put to good use.

    My brothers and their families came up for New Year as well. It's lovely to see them all. As we weren't sure when we'd be moving or if everything would be packed up, they booked a hotel in advance (Premier Inn with breakfast included for 2 nights £70 - great value!) so it was less stressful for me as I didn't have to host this time and we all met up at Mum's place for meals. She lives in an independent living unit so there is a large shared lounge area that we can use. So, all in all, it was a good Christmas / New Year break.

    There is some progress on the house front, which I wasn't expecting on the first day back! The buyer's solicitor has received our answers to her questions and the electrician is booked for Saturday to come and do the electrical testing. Fingers crossed we should be on track for the end of January

    I have to say, I haven't been very money saving over the Christmas break, except for the fact that I didn't do much shopping in the boxing day sales. I bought a couple of bits from Boots that I needed anyway and we saw a reindeer at the Range that was half price and we couldn't resist it. I did make a donation of £50 to help someone out as well, and I think it's £50 well spent. The radio DJ Stephanie Hirst shared a friend's Crowdfunding project to raise £4k for a friend who has got into a spot of bother after losing their job and taking out some pay day loans with astronomical interest rates so a small loan has escalated and he is about to lose everything so hopefully they'll raise enough to help get him back on track. Reading his story it sounds so easy to happen to anyone so I thought I would spare what I could to try and help get him back on his feet. I want to try and do more for charity etc. this year so I see this as a good start to the year and I'll have a think about what else I would like to do. I was thinking of volunteering with a phone service for elderly who live alone. AgeUK want volunteers to commit to a half hour call each week with an elderly person who lives alone and I think it sounds like a great cause so that will most likely be my next step
    Savings: Aim £13.5k. Dec 2016 £1,700 / Jan 2018 £11,900
    Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£216,000 / Jan 2018 -£193,000
    BTL Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£136,000/ Jan 2018 -£123,800
    CC 0%: Nov 2016 -£4,500 / Jan 2018 -£3,402.29
    Loan to In-Laws: Sep 2010 -£48,185.82 / Jan 2018 -£30,565.49
    Student Loan: March 2011 -£18,275.04 / April 2017 -£14,003.85
    • ch4rly2002
    • By ch4rly2002 2nd Jan 18, 3:55 PM
    • 292 Posts
    • 1,232 Thanks
    ch4rly2002
    If anyone else fancies making a small donation to help Dan get out of debt, or just to read his story, here's the link https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/dansdebts
    Savings: Aim £13.5k. Dec 2016 £1,700 / Jan 2018 £11,900
    Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£216,000 / Jan 2018 -£193,000
    BTL Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£136,000/ Jan 2018 -£123,800
    CC 0%: Nov 2016 -£4,500 / Jan 2018 -£3,402.29
    Loan to In-Laws: Sep 2010 -£48,185.82 / Jan 2018 -£30,565.49
    Student Loan: March 2011 -£18,275.04 / April 2017 -£14,003.85
    • themadvix
    • By themadvix 2nd Jan 18, 6:00 PM
    • 1,243 Posts
    • 7,477 Thanks
    themadvix
    Glad you had a good Christmas Charly! Happy New Year!
    OPs 2017 = £3103
    S&S ISA 2017 = £626
    OPs 2016 = £6142.12
    Starting balance 2012: £132000; balance Dec 2017: £96,822
    MFW2017 no. 38
    • Jessy103
    • By Jessy103 3rd Jan 18, 2:03 PM
    • 510 Posts
    • 2,166 Thanks
    Jessy103
    Sounds like you had a good Christmas and Happy New Year to you! x
    Original Mortgage Amount 2007 - £87,310.50
    Mortgage Amount Jan 2018 - £58,500.00
    Overpayment Target for 2018 - £5,000 /£369.23
    Jan - £369.23
    • ch4rly2002
    • By ch4rly2002 5th Jan 18, 9:46 AM
    • 292 Posts
    • 1,232 Thanks
    ch4rly2002
    This week has been difficult getting back into the work routine but at least it's been a short week! More people will be back to work next week so I imagine it will get back to normal. It's been fairly quiet at work, which I actually find harder than when it's busy - I'd rather have something to do than trying to think of things to fill my time with. Luckily, it gave me chance to get our self-assessment tax returns done (I've never done it this close to the deadline before!), but when I first tried to submit it I kept getting an error saying there was a temporary issue and to try logging on later. I suspect most of the country had decided to try and submit their returns at the same time I logged on late last night and managed to submit them though so we won't be put on the naughty step. Lesson learned for the next return!

    Our friend gave me a recipe for making homemade Nak'd bars and I am really looking forward to trying them. I'm sat munching on a Nak'd cashew bar now for my breakfast and it's not as flavoursome or soft/moist as Paul's. I'm going to start making my own as I often don't feel like eating any breakfast and find a Nak'd bar easily to force myself to eat. I don't know if it will save any money (I imagine so as Nak'd bars aren't that cheap and with the recipe you can make loads of bars). If anyone likes those bars and would like me to post the recipe, just let me know and I'll dig it out to put on here.

    We're picking up the in-laws from Manchester airport later. It'll be nice to see them after they've been in the US since 10th November! We'll probably get a take away with them... I'm not sure how much they'll feel like eating but I did read that the quickest way to adjust to the local timezone and lessen jet lag was to eat the local meal at the time you arrive and go to bed at the local time so if they manage to eat something and go to bed at a reasonable time, they might manage to lessen their jet lag. It'll help BIL as well as he won't have to make his own tea. Not very MSE, but as takeaways go, their local Chinese is delicious and reasonably priced so it's not too terrible.

    Speaking of food, I'm really happy with the progress I'm making on running down the tin cupboard and freezer, although from looking at what's left, I think I'm going to have to Google some innovative meals to make with copious amounts of tinned tuna! Last night's meal was mainly a freezer meal (pork chops that I'd frozen to stop them going off when we couldn't eat them in time, roast potatoes, frozen peas and a couple of onion rings left over from the Christmas steaks), only the carrots, BBQ sauce and cheese were from the fridge. Today's lunch is from the freezer as well - some teacakes (breadrolls to most other people out there - don't want to start a debate on names ) and sausages. Poor DH was presented with a bowl of Frosties the last two days as they're the only cereal no-one in our family likes from the multi-pack of mini cereals and unfortunately for him they were in date so no excuse to just chuck them out!

    It's slow on the survey front at the moment. Perhaps the survey writers haven't returned from work or got into full swing yet. OnePoll is up to £33.90, this last bit seems to be taking forever. I've just cashed out on Prolific too at £8.48 - I normally wait until £20 but I just haven't been having any surveys recently so I've cashed in and will keep checking for new surveys in the meantime. I need to pick up Yougov again. I gave in when the progress was going so slowly and I didn't particularly enjoy doing their surveys but I feel like I'm ready to tackle that again. another one I want to look into is Swagbucks. I never made any progress on there but in another diary I read they mentioned ways around it so you can still progress if you get screened out of surveys. I need to look into it really (I think it was Madvix so I will have to take a look over her recent posts for clues as well).

    On the house front, we received an email from our solicitor yesterday. Yet more questions from the seller's solicitor. Some were repeat questions from last time and some were a bit strange. anyway, we answered them as best we could and replied straight away so hopefully there won't be any more delays! We also took all the packing boxes from the loft last night so we can make a start on the packing. We're not looking forward to it, but it has to be done. I've no ideas how much it costs to hire a packing service but I imagine it costs a lot so we'll get cracking now to make it less painful down the line. I've not really got round to listing much on eBay recently (I really must get back into the swing of it) but I have managed to Freecycle some things that didn't sell on eBay. I've also managed to donate a few items to a family member who has a friend in dire need so hopefully I will be able to send a few more things her way.
    Savings: Aim £13.5k. Dec 2016 £1,700 / Jan 2018 £11,900
    Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£216,000 / Jan 2018 -£193,000
    BTL Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£136,000/ Jan 2018 -£123,800
    CC 0%: Nov 2016 -£4,500 / Jan 2018 -£3,402.29
    Loan to In-Laws: Sep 2010 -£48,185.82 / Jan 2018 -£30,565.49
    Student Loan: March 2011 -£18,275.04 / April 2017 -£14,003.85
    • themadvix
    • By themadvix 6th Jan 18, 3:17 PM
    • 1,243 Posts
    • 7,477 Thanks
    themadvix
    Hi Charly, good luck with SBs - if you want any tips I'd suggest checking out the Swabucking into 2018(?) (I haven't seen a 2018 one yet, but if not, 2017) opening post - there's lots of info in there, especially if you have an android phone and can use all the video apps. It's tedious if there aren't surveys, but it does add up.
    OPs 2017 = £3103
    S&S ISA 2017 = £626
    OPs 2016 = £6142.12
    Starting balance 2012: £132000; balance Dec 2017: £96,822
    MFW2017 no. 38
    • shangaijimmy
    • By shangaijimmy 6th Jan 18, 7:05 PM
    • 2,342 Posts
    • 11,219 Thanks
    shangaijimmy
    How have you got on with your new spreadsheet?
    MFW: Turning June 2036 into March 2023... 34//120 Payments Challenge, Diary Reduction £36,628.18
    Aug 2009: £163,051 // Current: £99,371.84 // Avg Daily Interest £4.46
    MFiT-T4 #8 - 56.74% of £41,000
    • ch4rly2002
    • By ch4rly2002 8th Jan 18, 10:57 AM
    • 292 Posts
    • 1,232 Thanks
    ch4rly2002
    Thanks MadVix, I'll take a look and see how I get on

    ShangaiJimmy, I love the spreadsheet! I've input my figures for 2018 and will use it going forward. I also had a play with it and entered the figures from when we moved into this house 3 years ago and it shows that our daily interest has gone down from £19.47 to £10.57! I know it will go up a lot when we move into the new house, but it will really help to see the daily interest and watch it go down as we overpay. Thank you

    We've had a relatively cheap few days. After picking up the in-laws from the airport, they wanted to eat quickly, rather than wait until we got home then order food so we went to McDonalds instead. We tried to treat them but they were having none of it so we ended up being treated instead!

    On Saturday we went to my Dad's place to pick up my Mum (DH stayed in the car as he's still wary of being around Dad in case he passes on his cold). We then went to my Grandma's house to take down her Christmas decorations and we stopped to do some shopping for her on the way. DH and I hadn't eaten so we grabbed a meal deal while we were shopping, which we then ate at Grandma's. I'm not sure if I have actually been charged for it though as I used Apple pay on my phone, as I often do, and I got the notification on my phone from Apple pay to say that MBNA had registered a charge of £6, but the till was still asking for payment. I called over a member of staff and showed them the message on my mobile phone and the message on the screen of the till. It's never happened to me before and they'd never seen that either so in the end they just told me to take the shopping and they cancelled it off. I guess I'll find out in a couple of days if the payment registered. Grandma was happy that her decorations were taken down and stored back in the loft, and that we'd brought her some shopping. She gave me £30, which I tried to refuse because I really don't think she should be giving me money all the time, but she wasn't having any of it and actually got quite upset when I tried to hand it back so I said thank you very much, but I really don't like that she feels she has to pay me to help her

    After we took Grandma's decorations down we headed over to the in-laws. They had kindly invited DH, me and my mum round for a meal on Saturday in lieu of Christmas dinner. It was lovely. DH, BIL, mum and I watched Catchphrase while the in-laws cooked the meal (they wouldn't let any of us lift a finger), then when it was ready we went through to the table and it was set beautifully with Christmas crackers... of course we all had to pull them and wear the silly hats for the rest of the meal! They even finished off with Christmas pudding and brandy sauce. The food was great and the company was even better! Afterwards the in-laws opened their Christmas presents from us and gave us the gifts they'd brought back from America. BIL had even bought each of us a scratch card, and a joint lottery ticket. Sadly, we're not millionaires, however the in-laws won £7 between them

    Yesterday we used up the last of the fridge items and some bits from the freezer. We're now ready to go shopping today. I'm going to take an inventory at lunch time so I know what meals I can make to use up some of the items still lurking in the tin cupboard and freezer. I'm going to try and keep to basic rations now so we'll hopefully not have much, if any, food to take with us when we move.

    We have the BIL over tonight and DH is cooking so I'll have a nice relaxing evening. We're currently watching Stranger Things season 2 (DH and I have already watched it but it is new to BIL). When there isn't Game of Thrones or The Walking Dead on we tend to rely on Netflix and Youtube to fill the weeks in between. The Walking Dead usually starts up again around my birthday but we may be in the new house then, so we'll have to see what we do then. We will either end up watching it separately or hold off watching until we see BIL, but it's hard with spoilers posted on Facebook or BIL's colleagues talking about it so we'll have to see how that plays out.

    Nothing new to report on the house front, other than we have taken the packing boxes out from the loft and done nothing else! We really must make a start this week, even if we only do an hour after work each day, it will be a start and then when we start to see it making an impact I think it will spur us on to finish as much as we can. I think half of the issue is that we don't have a completion date yet. DH seems to have a nagging doubt and isn't sure the move will actually happen. I think this is due to the buyers' solicitor coming back with questions, not having a completion date yet and the electrician who is due to complete an electrical certificate cancelling on us on Saturday (still no new date for when he will come). I'm remaining optimistic, although I am aware that we need to get removal quotes and book them well in advance so I am starting to get a little nervous about it. Hopefully this week will bring some good news for us.

    eBay listings have stalled so that is another aim for this week. I also told DH we need to look at things as we pack and decide if we really want to keep it. I'm going to try to cut down on what we end up taking, but we'll see. He is very sentimental about things (read as borderline hoarder) so I find it hard to convince him to part with things. Luckily he doesn't buy much so at least he's not accumulating more.
    Last edited by ch4rly2002; 08-01-2018 at 11:00 AM.
    Savings: Aim £13.5k. Dec 2016 £1,700 / Jan 2018 £11,900
    Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£216,000 / Jan 2018 -£193,000
    BTL Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£136,000/ Jan 2018 -£123,800
    CC 0%: Nov 2016 -£4,500 / Jan 2018 -£3,402.29
    Loan to In-Laws: Sep 2010 -£48,185.82 / Jan 2018 -£30,565.49
    Student Loan: March 2011 -£18,275.04 / April 2017 -£14,003.85
    • ch4rly2002
    • By ch4rly2002 8th Jan 18, 4:41 PM
    • 292 Posts
    • 1,232 Thanks
    ch4rly2002
    First fleabay sale of the year... a grand total of £3!!! Still, it was something that was given to me free with a store purchase so it's only cost me the fees and postage. Every little helps as they say and it will all add up.

    New items listed on fleabay, so feeling like I've finally got my bum in gear
    Savings: Aim £13.5k. Dec 2016 £1,700 / Jan 2018 £11,900
    Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£216,000 / Jan 2018 -£193,000
    BTL Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£136,000/ Jan 2018 -£123,800
    CC 0%: Nov 2016 -£4,500 / Jan 2018 -£3,402.29
    Loan to In-Laws: Sep 2010 -£48,185.82 / Jan 2018 -£30,565.49
    Student Loan: March 2011 -£18,275.04 / April 2017 -£14,003.85
    • themadvix
    • By themadvix 9th Jan 18, 11:02 AM
    • 1,243 Posts
    • 7,477 Thanks
    themadvix
    Sounds like you had a really lovely time at your in-laws, and well-deserved too - you do a lot of caring for others, so it's nice to hear that others look after you too!

    Good news on the ebay sale! Keep the momentum up
    OPs 2017 = £3103
    S&S ISA 2017 = £626
    OPs 2016 = £6142.12
    Starting balance 2012: £132000; balance Dec 2017: £96,822
    MFW2017 no. 38
    • ch4rly2002
    • By ch4rly2002 9th Jan 18, 4:48 PM
    • 292 Posts
    • 1,232 Thanks
    ch4rly2002
    Thanks MV, I love how your positivity spreads over to my thread

    Today I finally went shopping as we were pretty much depleted of everything - I even managed to bag a couple of YS items so I'm feeling pretty happy with that. I have plans for a few more of the items in the tin cupboard so the mission to run down our stock continues.

    DH is feeling motivated to pack, so tonight he's going to get cracking on packing up the alcohol and glasses on our bar. My aim is to list the table and chairs in the kitchen which are now surplus to requirements, so I'm thinking FB selling pages or Gumtree are probably the best places to start with that. We also need to bring down the bed bases and mattresses that we're getting rid of as I can't arrange the collection until they're outside. That's going to be a tough job with just DH and me... I would ask BIL to help but he has a shocking cold at the moment so I don't want to push him. DH has a cold but he's coming out the end of it now so it's probably not too bad to ask him

    I went onto the tax return site today to print mine and DH's tax calculations and it shows DH is owed £43 back whereas I owed £6.20, so I have paid that immediately as there's a deadline of 31st January and I don't want to find out what happens if you don't pay!
    Savings: Aim £13.5k. Dec 2016 £1,700 / Jan 2018 £11,900
    Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£216,000 / Jan 2018 -£193,000
    BTL Mortgage: Dec 2014 -£136,000/ Jan 2018 -£123,800
    CC 0%: Nov 2016 -£4,500 / Jan 2018 -£3,402.29
    Loan to In-Laws: Sep 2010 -£48,185.82 / Jan 2018 -£30,565.49
    Student Loan: March 2011 -£18,275.04 / April 2017 -£14,003.85
    • themadvix
    • By themadvix 10th Jan 18, 9:20 AM
    • 1,243 Posts
    • 7,477 Thanks
    themadvix
    That's so kind of you Charly! I'm sure I only post when I'm feeling positive though - it's not an entirely accurate reflection!

    It's great that your DH has got some motivation for packing. I can imagine it's a daunting task (we've yet to do it!). Good news on the tax rebate for him too.
    OPs 2017 = £3103
    S&S ISA 2017 = £626
    OPs 2016 = £6142.12
    Starting balance 2012: £132000; balance Dec 2017: £96,822
    MFW2017 no. 38
    • Jessy103
    • By Jessy103 10th Jan 18, 10:00 AM
    • 510 Posts
    • 2,166 Thanks
    Jessy103
    Let me know if you need to re-home that alcohol from your bar, I'm pretty sure i can give it a good one! Lol! Good luck with the packing and well done on the tin cupboard, it's so easy to forget what you have lurking and end up buying more!
    Original Mortgage Amount 2007 - £87,310.50
    Mortgage Amount Jan 2018 - £58,500.00
    Overpayment Target for 2018 - £5,000 /£369.23
    Jan - £369.23
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