Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 1st Dec 16, 4:37 PM
    • 11Posts
    • 7Thanks
    Blue25
    Help with 1st credit
    • #1
    • 1st Dec 16, 4:37 PM
    Help with 1st credit 1st Dec 16 at 4:37 PM
    Hi everyone, I am new and thought I'd seek help here as I've been panicking since yesterday evening.

    So, here's what happened:
    More than one year ago, when I used to live with my ex-partner, he made some purchases on line using my name and without telling me or asking my permission. The bill was around £350.

    In July 2015, I get a letter from the company where he made the purchase, saying that I had an outstanding balance for the mentioned sum. I was like, really? Who are you?
    When I confronted my ex boyfriend, he made up some excuses and said he would pay it off.Of course he never did, so around December 2015 I started to receive letters from Lowell (another debt collection company), stating they had bought the debt and that I should deal with them. They were asking around £500.

    After that, I managed to make my ex partner call them and admit the debt was his own since he had just used my full name. Of course, they said that I was still accountable for it myself. I also emailed the Consumer GAA (Citizen Advice), asking where I stood: they said that the right course of action was reporting my partner for identity theft; while they could not advise me on that regard, they would provide Trading Standards with all the information I had supplied.
    Then, magically, from January 2016, I did not hear from Lowell any longer, so I have stupidly assumed that the matter was over, that a couple of emails and phone calls had sorted everything.

    Fast forward to yesterday evening.
    I have obviously split up with the delinquent and now I live in a shared house. I came home last night and to my horror I found a letter from 1st Credit. It was just the standard letter where they need me to confirm that I am the person they are searching and they need to speak to me regarding to a "personal matter".
    Thanks to past experience with the delinquent, I know it is best not to aknowledge them. However, I am freaking out, been unable to sleep or eat all day. I went to the CAB and they told me to go back in one week for free drop in advice.
    My worst fear is that my landlady, who lives most of the year abroad and keeps me in high regard, will know something about the matter and decide to give me the eviction.

    What's the best thing to do? What can they actually do? Shall I inform the landlady, is my situation going to affect the household?

    Christmas is coming up and really going back to my country with these thoughts on mind is not the best.
    To this date, I still don't know what the delinquent has bought in my name.
    Sorry for writing a novel, as it is obvious I deal very bad with anxiety and it takes much less than this to make me panic.
    If anyone can advise, suggest, tell a word of relief I will be most grateful! Thanks!!!!
Page 1
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 1st Dec 16, 4:45 PM
    • 15,118 Posts
    • 14,765 Thanks
    Guest101
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 16, 4:45 PM
    • #2
    • 1st Dec 16, 4:45 PM
    Hi everyone, I am new and thought I'd seek help here as I've been panicking since yesterday evening.

    So, here's what happened:
    More than one year ago, when I used to live with my ex-partner, he made some purchases on line using my name and without telling me or asking my permission. The bill was around £350.

    In July 2015, I get a letter from the company where he made the purchase, saying that I had an outstanding balance for the mentioned sum. I was like, really? Who are you?
    When I confronted my ex boyfriend, he made up some excuses and said he would pay it off.Of course he never did, so around December 2015 I started to receive letters from Lowell (another debt collection company), stating they had bought the debt and that I should deal with them. They were asking around £500.

    After that, I managed to make my ex partner call them and admit the debt was his own since he had just used my full name. Of course, they said that I was still accountable for it myself. I also emailed the Consumer GAA (Citizen Advice), asking where I stood: they said that the right course of action was reporting my partner for identity theft; while they could not advise me on that regard, they would provide Trading Standards with all the information I had supplied.
    Then, magically, from January 2016, I did not hear from Lowell any longer, so I have stupidly assumed that the matter was over, that a couple of emails and phone calls had sorted everything.

    Fast forward to yesterday evening.
    I have obviously split up with the delinquent and now I live in a shared house. I came home last night and to my horror I found a letter from 1st Credit. It was just the standard letter where they need me to confirm that I am the person they are searching and they need to speak to me regarding to a "personal matter".
    Thanks to past experience with the delinquent, I know it is best not to aknowledge them. However, I am freaking out, been unable to sleep or eat all day. I went to the CAB and they told me to go back in one week for free drop in advice.
    My worst fear is that my landlady, who lives most of the year abroad and keeps me in high regard, will know something about the matter and decide to give me the eviction.

    What's the best thing to do? What can they actually do? Shall I inform the landlady, is my situation going to affect the household?

    Christmas is coming up and really going back to my country with these thoughts on mind is not the best.
    To this date, I still don't know what the delinquent has bought in my name.
    Sorry for writing a novel, as it is obvious I deal very bad with anxiety and it takes much less than this to make me panic.
    If anyone can advise, suggest, tell a word of relief I will be most grateful! Thanks!!!!
    Originally posted by Blue25
    Oh for goodness sake.


    1: Why would your landlady care? Its a personal debt. Nothing to do with her, any more than you having an overdraft or a credit card. No reason to evict you. And depending on how long your tenancy is for, she cant anyway until the fixed term is up.


    2: No you don't report him for identity theft, you sue him in civil court for the money.


    3: they're debt collectors, completely toothless at this stage. I suggest you start paying it off and getting the money from your ex.
  • National Debtline
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 16, 5:30 PM
    • #3
    • 1st Dec 16, 5:30 PM
    Hi Blue25 and welcome to MSE,


    I think the key issue is not to panic. 1st Credit are just a debt collector, they can't come into your home or touch anything, so try not to worry about them. If they want to take this further they would need to use the county court and you would get court forms, however, that doesn't alert your landlady or, in all probability, mean anything to her (debts don't interlock in the way you are worried about). Court is nothing to panic about either. It is mainly done in the post and you can contact one of the free debt charities about how to respond - if it gets that far.


    You have a couple of choices with the debt - you can report the situation to Action Fraud and they will give you a reference. You can then write back to 1st Credit and explain you have been the victim of identity fraud and ask them to investigate (you can also say you raised this with Lowell but without a reference number that may not have much impact).


    Please bear in mind this can have other consequences for your ex (from a criminal perspective) but without a crime reference your complaint of fraud is unlikely to be taken seriously by the debt collector. If they agree it is fraud the matter should be written off and closed. If they feel you are liable you can escalate the whole thing to the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS). I cannot really comment about whether you can take civil action in a matter like this, I think you would need some legal advice before going down that route.


    Laura
    @natdebtline
    We work as money advisers for National Debtline and have specific permission from MSE to post to try to help those in debt. Read more information on National Debtline in MSE's Debt Problems: What to do and where to get help guide. If you find you're struggling with debt and need further help try our online advice tool My Money Steps
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 1st Dec 16, 5:36 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Blue25
    • #4
    • 1st Dec 16, 5:36 PM
    Thanks!
    • #4
    • 1st Dec 16, 5:36 PM
    Many thanks for you quick reply.

    When I moved in, my landlady knew I was getting away from somebody who has debts problems. At some points, she warned me of "not telling anyone" the new address, or else she could have problems herself if she were in need to ask for a loan or similar. That's why I think she would care.

    As far as getting money from him, I think it's more likely 1st credit will provide me with a gift Amazon Voucher. I don't want to sue him either. I had enough troubles from him (I totally get the "oh for godness sake", this is what I tell to myself everyday).

    So, next time they write, hopefully with more information, shall I just set a repayment plan? They won't call here at home? I rather none of my house mates knew. Thanks again!
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 1st Dec 16, 5:45 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Blue25
    • #5
    • 1st Dec 16, 5:45 PM
    Thanks Laura!
    • #5
    • 1st Dec 16, 5:45 PM
    Hi Blue25 and welcome to MSE,


    I think the key issue is not to panic. 1st Credit are just a debt collector, they can't come into your home or touch anything, so try not to worry about them. If they want to take this further they would need to use the county court and you would get court forms, however, that doesn't alert your landlady or, in all probability, mean anything to her (debts don't interlock in the way you are worried about). Court is nothing to panic about either. It is mainly done in the post and you can contact one of the free debt charities about how to respond - if it gets that far.


    You have a couple of choices with the debt - you can report the situation to Action Fraud and they will give you a reference. You can then write back to 1st Credit and explain you have been the victim of identity fraud and ask them to investigate (you can also say you raised this with Lowell but without a reference number that may not have much impact).


    Please bear in mind this can have other consequences for your ex (from a criminal perspective) but without a crime reference your complaint of fraud is unlikely to be taken seriously by the debt collector. If they agree it is fraud the matter should be written off and closed. If they feel you are liable you can escalate the whole thing to the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS). I cannot really comment about whether you can take civil action in a matter like this, I think you would need some legal advice before going down that route.


    Laura
    @natdebtline
    Originally posted by National Debtline
    Many thanks! This is really accurate! I don't like the idea of parting with money either, and I feel so much relieved about potential consequences on people around me. I was dreading for them to come around. I will get in touch with Action Fraud then. Thanks a lot Laura, I wish you the best
    Last edited by Blue25; 01-12-2016 at 5:48 PM. Reason: Misunderstood something
  • National Debtline
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 16, 5:46 PM
    • #6
    • 1st Dec 16, 5:46 PM
    Hello again,


    Cross posts with Blue25


    I think your landlady may be a bit confused as debts used to be linked to addresses (many years ago). That is no longer the case, debts are linked to individuals and their credit files so your debts would have absolutely no impact on your landlady's ability to obtain credit in her own right. Debt collectors very rarely visit anyone, it isn't worth their time to do so, but you can expect them to call and write.


    If you choose to accept to repay this (which you don't have to, I would suggest you sleep on it) then you would write to them with a SOA and make an offer to pay monthly what you can. Make sure you don't over stretch yourself and if they decline the offer then send it anyway to get it paid off as quick as possible.


    Laura
    @natdebtline
    Last edited by National Debtline; 01-12-2016 at 5:53 PM. Reason: cross posts
    We work as money advisers for National Debtline and have specific permission from MSE to post to try to help those in debt. Read more information on National Debtline in MSE's Debt Problems: What to do and where to get help guide. If you find you're struggling with debt and need further help try our online advice tool My Money Steps
    • Shakin Steve
    • By Shakin Steve 1st Dec 16, 6:05 PM
    • 1,137 Posts
    • 844 Thanks
    Shakin Steve
    • #7
    • 1st Dec 16, 6:05 PM
    • #7
    • 1st Dec 16, 6:05 PM
    Be aware that once you make a payment, you will accept liability for the debt.
    I came into this world with nothing and I've got most of it left.
    • sourcrates
    • By sourcrates 1st Dec 16, 6:08 PM
    • 12,691 Posts
    • 12,030 Thanks
    sourcrates
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 16, 6:08 PM
    • #8
    • 1st Dec 16, 6:08 PM
    Hi OP,

    Don't pay them anything !!!!

    just follow Laura's advice above, follow the correct procedure, via Action Fraud, and the debt will go away.

    Once 1st credit have that information officially, they will drop the debt like a hot stone, and most likely write it off.

    But if you make any payment to them, you will be accepting responsibility for the debt and they will pursue you for it.
    I'm a Board Guide on the Debt-Free Wannabe, Credit File And Ratings, and
    Bankruptcy And Living With It, boards. "I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly".
    Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an abusive or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com.

    For free debt advice, contact either : Stepchange, National Debtline, or, CAB.
    For Legal advice see : http://legalbeagles.info/
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 1st Dec 16, 6:26 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Blue25
    • #9
    • 1st Dec 16, 6:26 PM
    • #9
    • 1st Dec 16, 6:26 PM
    Thanks everyone! I am impressed, I was not expecting to get so much advice in such a short time! Yes, I don't think I should pay either. Besides, my ex has a long experience with debt recovery (which I didn't know before I moved in with him), so when he used my name for his order he really knew what it meant and what he was putting me through. I will just wait for 1st Credit to come back with more details. Tonight I can eat and sleep
    Blessings to you all!
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 1st Dec 16, 6:32 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Blue25
    Cross posts
    Hello again,


    Cross posts with Blue25


    I think your landlady may be a bit confused as debts used to be linked to addresses (many years ago). That is no longer the case, debts are linked to individuals and their credit files so your debts would have absolutely no impact on your landlady's ability to obtain credit in her own right. Debt collectors very rarely visit anyone, it isn't worth their time to do so, but you can expect them to call and write.


    If you choose to accept to repay this (which you don't have to, I would suggest you sleep on it) then you would write to them with a SOA and make an offer to pay monthly what you can. Make sure you don't over stretch yourself and if they decline the offer then send it anyway to get it paid off as quick as possible.


    Laura
    @natdebtline
    Originally posted by National Debtline
    Thanks Laura, I was responding to Guest101 but what you say makes so much sense. I had also thought that if debt were to be related to the address rather than the name, then every landlord would ask for a credit check before signing a lease. Oh my. Hope I will have better judgement in future! Thanks
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 1st Dec 16, 6:35 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Blue25
    True
    Be aware that once you make a payment, you will accept liability for the debt.
    Originally posted by Shakin Steve
    Yes that's what I was thinking as well, based on the knowledge I have gained on the matter thanks to my relation with that individual. I also dread for other debt collectors coming in future claiming the debt was not paid off and so forth.
    • ada-or-ardor
    • By ada-or-ardor 1st Dec 16, 8:08 PM
    • 125 Posts
    • 528 Thanks
    ada-or-ardor
    It sounds like you've had some great advice and I hope you're feeling a bit calmer. Remind yourself, you have done nothing wrong and therefore aren't guilty. So if you follow all the right steps, eventually the right thing should happen and you wont be liable.

    To put your mind at ease about any other debts, might it be worth checking your credit file with the various providers (like experience and noddle)? Hopefully it was just the one that your ex took out in your name, but at least this way you can check and be proactive in any others. Gives you some of the control and the power rather than worrying every time an envelope lands on the floor! They should be free, at least for 30 days, and its worth checking all options as sometimes they show different things (not all creditors submit all information to all three so it's not a standardised service).

    Good luck and sleep well! :-)

    Ada
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 2nd Dec 16, 11:47 AM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Blue25
    Hi there, it's me again

    As someone suggested, I have just asked for a free credit report.
    It appears that I have 3 defaults from 3 different debt collectors (2 of them being Lowell and 1st Credit). They relate to 3 mail orders, accounts opened in 3 different dates. Obviously not my mail orders.
    Sorry for the stupid question, does it mean I have 3 different debts on my credit history?
    It never ever came to my mind to look into that.
    • sourcrates
    • By sourcrates 2nd Dec 16, 12:19 PM
    • 12,691 Posts
    • 12,030 Thanks
    sourcrates
    Hi there, it's me again

    As someone suggested, I have just asked for a free credit report.
    It appears that I have 3 defaults from 3 different debt collectors (2 of them being Lowell and 1st Credit). They relate to 3 mail orders, accounts opened in 3 different dates. Obviously not my mail orders.
    Sorry for the stupid question, does it mean I have 3 different debts on my credit history?
    It never ever came to my mind to look into that.
    Originally posted by Blue25
    Yes, looks like your ex has been busy.

    If/when you are contacted about them, same advice and procedure apply, as with 1st credit.
    I'm a Board Guide on the Debt-Free Wannabe, Credit File And Ratings, and
    Bankruptcy And Living With It, boards. "I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly".
    Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an abusive or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com.

    For free debt advice, contact either : Stepchange, National Debtline, or, CAB.
    For Legal advice see : http://legalbeagles.info/
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 2nd Dec 16, 12:25 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Blue25
    Yes, looks like your ex has been busy.

    If/when you are contacted about them, same advice and procedure apply, as with 1st credit.
    Originally posted by sourcrates
    I have some evidence for the debt owned by Lowell.
    The other two debts, I was never aware of.
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 2nd Dec 16, 3:13 PM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Blue25
    I have done my report and got a reference number. Thanks to everyone!
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 17th May 17, 7:48 AM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Blue25
    2nd round (trying to restore my credit score)
    Hi there, thanks to the ones who helped me at the first round. Now I am back for the second

    Not really sure this is the right place to post my question, sorry if this is out of contest.
    Long story short, 6 months after my original post, I have entertained a fruitless correspondence with the debt collectors, the original seller (that is the on line catalogue where my ex partner opened multiple accounts in my name) and a fraud expert from Experian.
    Nothing has been sorted, my credit rating is still crying. As of yesterday, someone from the fraud department of the original seller told me I need to go to the police and get a crime reference number. I said that I have already reported my ex to Action Fraud (I even sent the original seller a letter stating the reference number), but they said that it doesn't count and I need to go to the police. I thought that the purpose of Action Fraud was in fact to report fraud cases to the police, but now I am told it doesn't count?
    Can anyone shed some light? I am not as scared as I was 6 months ago , but it seems like I am asked to do the same things over and over again, writing, calling, reporting, and so on.
    Before I spend some fun time at a police station, I would like to know if there is some point in that, or if perhaps it's better I write to the financial ombudsman.
    Thanks to everyone!
    • sourcrates
    • By sourcrates 17th May 17, 9:26 AM
    • 12,691 Posts
    • 12,030 Thanks
    sourcrates
    You can ring the financial ombudsman advice line, or National Debtline, they will know the correct procedure to follow.
    I'm a Board Guide on the Debt-Free Wannabe, Credit File And Ratings, and
    Bankruptcy And Living With It, boards. "I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly".
    Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an abusive or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com.

    For free debt advice, contact either : Stepchange, National Debtline, or, CAB.
    For Legal advice see : http://legalbeagles.info/
    • Blue25
    • By Blue25 1st Dec 17, 11:29 AM
    • 11 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    Blue25
    Success!!!!
    Hi guys, I am finally writing happy news one year later: as of this morning, my credit rating is finally clean and set on "good" Also, I did not have to pay one single penny in order to re-establish my reputation.

    If you have read my story, you will know that my ex partner had fraudulently opened several catalogue accounts in my name whilst we were living together, accumulating a debt of £1250. When we split up and I learnt the ugly truth (one year ago), the debt collectors could not care less of my side of the story. It did not matter that I was oblivious of the mischief all the time, that my ex was at home more than I was, so that he could easily arrange deliveries and receive goods I had no clue about.

    Over the course of one year, I have received plenty of advice by all the organisations tackling identity theft, but it seemed like the only way of getting out of this was paying with my own money. The original lender and the 3 debt collection companies would not be persuaded otherwise. "We are sorry that this happened to you, but there is your name on it, plus you used to live at that address, which means you're accountable." It seemed like a Kafkian story.

    Then, it dawned on me that my ex had most likely provided his mobile number along with other personal details when setting up the accounts and making the orders; as it turned out, he had even given his own bank account details. The solution was indeed a no brainer: when I asked for a SAR, all those annoying people who had been breathing on my neck for months, just stepped back.

    It did not happen overnight, it still took a few weeks before the lenders got back to me with another of their silly letters stating that: since the accounts in my name were fraudulent, my request for a SAR could not be accepted (seriously, these people are as delinquent as the debtors they are chasing.) Basically, when I asked them to put on paper all the information they held about me, they suddenly realised I had been right all along

    Besides congratulating myself for my perseverance I would like to pass on the "Ask for a SAR" piece of advice to all naive people as myself, who had the misfortune to live with a partner/friend/family member with a shopping or gambling addiction along with a lack of empathy and emotions whatsoever.
    Secondly, if you have a similar story please do get in touch. I am determined to research about the so called "Familiar identity theft" and write a piece about it. I don't need names, I need stories.Please, if you want to contribute/give me a hand/ a tip, do not hesitate to PM me.
    Last but not least, I want to thank all the people who advised me on this forum about the first steps to take, if it wasn't for them and their reassuring words I would never have made it Have a very nice day
    • sourcrates
    • By sourcrates 1st Dec 17, 11:48 AM
    • 12,691 Posts
    • 12,030 Thanks
    sourcrates
    Well done, glad you got the right result in the end !!!!
    I'm a Board Guide on the Debt-Free Wannabe, Credit File And Ratings, and
    Bankruptcy And Living With It, boards. "I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly".
    Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an abusive or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com.

    For free debt advice, contact either : Stepchange, National Debtline, or, CAB.
    For Legal advice see : http://legalbeagles.info/
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,540Posts Today

6,643Users online

Martin's Twitter