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  • FIRST POST
    • HitforSix
    • By HitforSix 12th Nov 16, 9:09 PM
    • 5Posts
    • 1Thanks
    HitforSix
    Moving back to England - but where could we afford?
    • #1
    • 12th Nov 16, 9:09 PM
    Moving back to England - but where could we afford? 12th Nov 16 at 9:09 PM
    Hi! I am new to the forum. We are hoping to move back to England after living abroad, but need to work out the financial side. I need some help! My husband and I are both teachers, and before we go any further we need to work out the cost of living in different parts of the UK, where we would be able to afford to live and how much income we would need. We have three children, so school for them is also a consideration.
    Does anyone know how I can find out likely monthly outgoings in different parts of the country? How much do living costs vary? It feels like a daunting task at the moment!
Page 1
    • missbiggles1
    • By missbiggles1 12th Nov 16, 9:12 PM
    • 16,396 Posts
    • 30,258 Thanks
    missbiggles1
    • #2
    • 12th Nov 16, 9:12 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Nov 16, 9:12 PM
    Your main outgoing will be housing - are you planning on buying or renting?
    • SailorSam
    • By SailorSam 12th Nov 16, 9:27 PM
    • 21,176 Posts
    • 36,783 Thanks
    SailorSam
    • #3
    • 12th Nov 16, 9:27 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Nov 16, 9:27 PM
    Although it may only give you a 'ball park' figure, or the price it was when houses were last sold. This may help if you click on different parts of the Country.
    http://www.zoopla.co.uk/heatmaps/
    Liverpool is one of the wonders of Britain,
    What it may grow to in time, I know not what.

    Daniel Defoe: 1725.
    • HitforSix
    • By HitforSix 14th Nov 16, 10:45 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    HitforSix
    • #4
    • 14th Nov 16, 10:45 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Nov 16, 10:45 AM
    Hi missbiggles1, we are planning to buy, although possibly not immediately.


    Thanks SailorSam, that is a really useful website.


    Would you say that costs like food and petrol vary in different areas?
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 16th Nov 16, 3:02 AM
    • 37,876 Posts
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    Savvy_Sue
    • #5
    • 16th Nov 16, 3:02 AM
    • #5
    • 16th Nov 16, 3:02 AM
    Would you say that costs like food and petrol vary in different areas?
    Originally posted by HitforSix
    They do, although I'd find it hard to say by how much. I know when I visit one of my siblings it's best to fill up before I leave here (large city) as petrol is several pence per litre dearer around her home (large town).

    Again, across my city, food costs can vary wildly: 'artisan' food freely available in some areas, and discount stores in others.

    Even the charity shops vary from one area to another!!!

    But it's not difficult here to get away from the really pricey stuff - the trick would be living somewhere with choice, rather than somewhere with very little choice!
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 2 shawls, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 1 seaman's hat ...
    Current projects: 1 shawl, another seaman's hat
    • HitforSix
    • By HitforSix 18th Nov 16, 1:23 PM
    • 5 Posts
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    HitforSix
    • #6
    • 18th Nov 16, 1:23 PM
    • #6
    • 18th Nov 16, 1:23 PM
    Thanks Savvy Sue - you're right, choice is important. I suppose what I wondered was whether costs vary in the same shops. For example is Sainsbury's in one place more expensive than Sainsbury's somewhere else? Maybe I could find this out online.
    • ringo_24601
    • By ringo_24601 18th Nov 16, 1:28 PM
    • 17,103 Posts
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    ringo_24601
    • #7
    • 18th Nov 16, 1:28 PM
    • #7
    • 18th Nov 16, 1:28 PM
    Cost of living is marginal really. Food costs may be a few percent more expensive in one area compared to another but nothing significant.

    Housing and childcare would be the biggest things.

    e.g. 3 bed semi detached in the South East might be £350k - 500k compared to £100k-250k in the North.

    Teaching salaries are similar around the country, with some 'London weighting allowance' within the M25. But an extra £10k between you won't counteract the significantly higher house prices.
    • HitforSix
    • By HitforSix 18th Nov 16, 1:37 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    HitforSix
    • #8
    • 18th Nov 16, 1:37 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Nov 16, 1:37 PM
    Thanks. Regarding mortgage deposits, what is the sort of percentage we would need to put down? We would consider renting to begin with but it is worth knowing.
    • ringo_24601
    • By ringo_24601 18th Nov 16, 1:44 PM
    • 17,103 Posts
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    ringo_24601
    • #9
    • 18th Nov 16, 1:44 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Nov 16, 1:44 PM
    A 10% deposit would be a decent guideline. Obviously, the more you can put down the better interest rate you'll get, and the wider range of mortgage suppliers that you'll have access to.
    • Heedtheadvice
    • By Heedtheadvice 15th Jan 17, 7:44 PM
    • 640 Posts
    • 319 Thanks
    Heedtheadvice
    Ringo is fairly spot on.
    Petrol/diesel prices vary as to area maybe 5% but more from supermarkets to motorway service stations.

    Food prices vary more between city to rural areas and discounters to premium shops respectively being more as well as freshness and quality of produce.

    Other goods effectively can be fairly constant via internet buying except for deliver to very outlying areas.

    Commuting can be though of as very costly with season tickets in the thousands but then again that is far less than just annual depreciation on a car (here [my 'remote' location] a car is essential, no trains, infrequent and unlinked public transport with high travel distances) . SE England home counties (and further) are also frequently homes for London workers pushing up travel costs just owing to distances.

    There are variation in heating/power costs but less significant than supplier tariff and building efficiency but can be similar surprisingly to winter heating for say Greece where property is poorly insulated.

    Overall costs are higher in locations that are 'nice' compared to deprived areas.

    Probably no surprises there.......
    Last edited by Heedtheadvice; 15-01-2017 at 7:47 PM.
    • Heedtheadvice
    • By Heedtheadvice 15th Jan 17, 7:59 PM
    • 640 Posts
    • 319 Thanks
    Heedtheadvice
    Further: put a search onto Google 'uk regional cost of living' to get some hard facts.
    You are quite lucky as teacher salaries vary little but costs do across the uk so you can select less prosperous areas but still get some good schooling!
    • leslieknope
    • By leslieknope 26th Jan 17, 4:38 PM
    • 314 Posts
    • 469 Thanks
    leslieknope
    stores like sainsburys and tesco tend to be similar if you go to the larger supermarket stores. the smaller stores on the highstreets/garages will vary however. the sainsbury local in central london can be more expensive than others.
    CCCC #33: £42/£240
    DFW: £4355/£4405
    • Broadwood
    • By Broadwood 27th Jan 17, 9:10 AM
    • 616 Posts
    • 611 Thanks
    Broadwood
    This might be some help.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-23234033
    Studying at The University of Life.
    • MONEYTREE
    • By MONEYTREE 22nd May 17, 11:16 AM
    • 144 Posts
    • 63 Thanks
    MONEYTREE
    Take a look at Hastings (where I live). Property is still cheap compared with say Brighton, London, etc.
    • Murphybear
    • By Murphybear 28th Jun 17, 4:35 PM
    • 3,307 Posts
    • 6,811 Thanks
    Murphybear
    We have been looking to rent in the South West for a while. Property prices vary a lot, generally the more rural the property, the cheaper it is.

    I would imagine that the cheaper areas to rent are in the areas of higher unemployment as well. As a rough guide you will need to have an income of 2.5 times the rental value.
    • Newly retired
    • By Newly retired 25th Sep 17, 10:29 PM
    • 2,334 Posts
    • 2,696 Thanks
    Newly retired
    All things considered, on two teachers' salaries a family could live comfortably but not necessarily lavishly in many parts of the East Midlands or cheaper in parts of the North, but there will be variations according to locality. I can't really speak with experience of anywhere else. As others have said, housing costs are crucial.
    Do you have links with anyone, anywhere? It is always helpful financially if relatives can help out with some after school care when you have parents evenings etc. Also consider ease of transport as well as costs.
    • Newly retired
    • By Newly retired 25th Sep 17, 10:31 PM
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    Newly retired
    Just realised OP was 10 months ago. Did you reach a decision?
    • pearl123
    • By pearl123 25th Sep 17, 11:15 PM
    • 1,268 Posts
    • 1,876 Thanks
    pearl123
    Take a look at Hastings (where I live). Property is still cheap compared with say Brighton, London, etc.
    Originally posted by MONEYTREE
    Hastings is a bit rough in places. There are some areas that are better in Hastings than others.
    • Biggles
    • By Biggles 29th Sep 17, 9:55 AM
    • 7,515 Posts
    • 4,911 Thanks
    Biggles
    Just realised OP was 10 months ago. Did you reach a decision?
    Originally posted by Newly retired
    She hasn't even logged in since Nov 2016.
    • thebestdayever
    • By thebestdayever 12th Oct 17, 2:34 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    thebestdayever
    Liverpool!
    I loved Liverpool; came for three weeks from Canada and haven't left since (4 years later).

    Met my wife there too!
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