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    • squirrelgirl
    • By squirrelgirl 9th Nov 16, 5:00 PM
    • 111Posts
    • 428Thanks
    squirrelgirl
    Vegan Living & Ethical Buying
    • #1
    • 9th Nov 16, 5:00 PM
    Vegan Living & Ethical Buying 9th Nov 16 at 5:00 PM
    Hi,

    I'm not sure if there is a thread which covers this already but I am a vegan who tries to consume as ethically as possible and wondered if there is anyone else out there trying to do the same thing in as much of a money saving way as possible!??

    I have recently had an increase in income and have therefore decided that from this day forward I will no longer purchase anything from any organisation that doesn't produce their goods ethically. It means that I will no longer use supermarkets; will either buy fresh products from a local organic box scheme or local organic producers; toiletries, household products and dry/tinned goods will be from a wholesale cooperative or a local health food shop.

    Tomorrow I will look at a greener energy provider- I can't afford solar panels at the moment but I can look at renewable electricity suppliers. I already bank with an ethical bank and am basing all my choices on ratings via the ethical consumer website.

    I know that this isn't going to be easy, not using any mainstream shops is going to take a lot of planning but I think its worth doing and hope that I'm not alone!!
    MFW £3331.96/£22968.96
Page 4
    • savvy
    • By savvy 27th Jun 17, 5:57 PM
    • 29,692 Posts
    • 45,315 Thanks
    savvy
    I don't think that anyone is preaching. Far as I can tell, this thread is for people who are following, or trying to follow a vegan lifestyle etc, not for having an argument about which is better, which is worse as a diet.
    Originally posted by bugslet
    Very well said bugslet!

    NigeWick - would really appreciate if you didn't try to 'preach' about a non vegan lifestyle in this thread, nobody is interested in arguing with you, thank you.
    Honorary Northern Bird bestowed by Anselm

    I'm a volunteer Board Guide on Special Occasions, Green/Ethical, Motoring/Overseas/UK Travel & Flood boards, I can move & change posts, but don't read them all, it's not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Report inappropriate or illegal posts to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. Views are MINE & not official MSE ones
    • drinkupretty
    • By drinkupretty 5th Jul 17, 5:49 PM
    • 2,635 Posts
    • 6,588 Thanks
    drinkupretty
    Has anyone seen "What the Health" on netflix yet? Though it is based on the American food standards, it is very eye opening!
    "I thought what I'd do was, I'd pretend I was one of those deaf-mutes"
    • K9sandFelines
    • By K9sandFelines 10th Jul 17, 7:02 PM
    • 1,804 Posts
    • 15,333 Thanks
    K9sandFelines
    Has anyone seen "What the Health" on netflix yet? Though it is based on the American food standards, it is very eye opening!
    Originally posted by drinkupretty
    I have half watched it but need to go back when I am paying more attention
    GC 2017 (£4,000) Jan £346.72 Feb £241.99 Mar £280.29 Apr £196.58 (app.) + £1.99 May £232.77Jun £191.14 Jul £280.45 Aug £220.62 (up to and incl 23rd) + Smart Pass £1.99 x 7 = £1.33

    ~ Still learning the art of frugality ~
    • squirrelgirl
    • By squirrelgirl 29th Jul 17, 1:29 PM
    • 111 Posts
    • 428 Thanks
    squirrelgirl
    I mentioned Permaculture as the way to harvest our meat. Grass fed beef is perfectly I respect a person's choice to be vegetarian or vegan but don't try and preach that it is THE answer to the world's problems when it clearly is not. We need diversity and not vast monoculture fields of grains grown using enormous unsustainable amounts of energy, poisons and chemical fertilisers.
    Originally posted by NigeWick
    The only person preaching on here is you NigeWick - and I have already asked you not to get into 'arguments' on this thread - it's about being vegan and buying ethically so your constant conversations regarding the mass production of foodstuffs is not relevant - that's not the idea of this thread; it's about buying and living as ethically as possible which obviously does not mean buying mass produced anything which you would know if you had taken the time to read the initial post. I'm not here to right the wrongs of the world, I'm here to share what I am doing and gain ideas from like-minded people.

    Right, that over and done with, lets get on to what I am doing!

    I have been really fortunate that one of my friends has started growing a great amount of veg veganically! It's been really useful and I have had an almost constant supply of tomatoes, courgettes, beans and beetroot! I am really pleased and she is pretty happy too as she really overdid the sowing this year!!

    I have been steadily working my way through my storecupboards but still don't need to do my big shop from Suma yet! It's really surprising how much food I have in - I know that some of it has been because I have bought things in bulk but I really don't want to be purchasing anything else until I have worked my way through the stuff I already have.

    I am cooking couscous today with roasted veg (all free and veganic) - I have roasted it with a little oil and homemade raspberry balsamic and I have added some apricots, dates and raisins to the couscous along with a touch of cinnamon. I also had some apples which I have cooked in maple syrup and peach liqueur for follow-ons

    Not much else to report really - just plodding on day to day and enjoying not going to the shops!!

    Hope you are all well
    MFW £3331.96/£22968.96
    • Alan_Brown
    • By Alan_Brown 31st Jul 17, 3:20 PM
    • 188 Posts
    • 259 Thanks
    Alan_Brown
    Please explain how having huge monocrop fields fed with chemicals and doused in poison can "save the environment" and keep our biodiversity.
    Originally posted by NigeWick

    In the US, 70% of the grain grown is fed to animals. The world’s cattle alone consume a quantity of food equal to the caloric needs of 8.7 billion people—more than the entire human population on Earth. Your 'huge monocrop' is actually used to feed animals, not humans.


    Unlike farm animals that are often fed the same feed month-in, month-out, humans require a far more diverse diet of root crops legumes, grains, fruits, berries, seeds, etc. maintaining a healthy biodiversity.


    If we stopped producing so much feed for animals, we would have more arable land available for human crops and so could use much less intensive farming methods and therefore use less chemicals.


    Getting back on topic, I have ordered my first pair of vegan 'leather' work shoes. I'm interested to see how they fair compared with leather shoes.
    Last edited by Alan_Brown; 31-07-2017 at 3:22 PM.
    • Ben84
    • By Ben84 1st Aug 17, 7:08 PM
    • 2,868 Posts
    • 3,522 Thanks
    Ben84
    If we stopped producing so much feed for animals, we would have more arable land available for human crops and so could use much less intensive farming methods and therefore use less chemicals.
    Originally posted by Alan_Brown
    Yes, when you eat animals you're effectively consuming all of the food they have eaten in their entire lives. Dairy and eggs also suffer from poor conversion of animal feed in to food for humans. The more plant foods people eat instead of animal products, the less land and resources are used.

    Getting back on topic, I have ordered my first pair of vegan 'leather' work shoes. I'm interested to see how they fair compared with leather shoes.
    Originally posted by Alan_Brown
    I prefer faux leather shoes. I find they resist dirt far better than real leather. Haven't had any issues with durability.

    that's not the idea of this thread; it's about buying and living as ethically as possible which obviously does not mean buying mass produced anything
    Originally posted by squirrelgirl
    I actually think mass production is inherently green. Sure, it can potentially be part of a production and supply chain with issues, such as where the raw materials come from and the durability/life span of the products, but the mass production aspect is not the problem - often it's a positive thing. Mass production is about efficiency, saving resources and meeting people's needs with less material and energy consumption. I think it can be an easy target because it does highlight just how much we consume when we see big factories with conveyors of products rushing along, but if they're making the products we need with less resources per item - which is the goal of mass production, it's aligned with green ideas, not wasteful ideas. Some products with an environmental focus are mass produced. Ecover cleaning products, for example. Solar panels and wind turbine parts too, and LED lighting products. For products with less environmental aims, it is at least reducing their impact.
    Last edited by Ben84; 01-08-2017 at 7:16 PM.
    • squirrelgirl
    • By squirrelgirl 2nd Sep 17, 4:18 PM
    • 111 Posts
    • 428 Thanks
    squirrelgirl
    I actually think mass production is inherently green. Sure, it can potentially be part of a production and supply chain with issues, such as where the raw materials come from and the durability/life span of the products, but the mass production aspect is not the problem - often it's a positive thing. Mass production is about efficiency, saving resources and meeting people's needs with less material and energy consumption. I think it can be an easy target because it does highlight just how much we consume when we see big factories with conveyors of products rushing along, but if they're making the products we need with less resources per item - which is the goal of mass production, it's aligned with green ideas, not wasteful ideas. Some products with an environmental focus are mass produced. Ecover cleaning products, for example. Solar panels and wind turbine parts too, and LED lighting products. For products with less environmental aims, it is at least reducing their impact.
    Originally posted by Ben84
    While I agree with the point you are making, for me it's not just about the environmental impact of a company-it's their parent company and their animal rights, human rights, supply chain etc too, so I'm not consuming mass produced products - obviously, there are some things which the information is incomplete on but I haven't found any mass producers to date that have met the standards I have set for myself. Its just personal choice.

    I've made some interesting raw foods recently - although my eating habits are erratic at best, it's been nice trying new stuff.....the 'goat' 'cheese' made with macadamia and cashews is lovely but scarily expensive to make so that's a definite 'treat' product!

    I have lots of raspberries coming through again - it's the second flush now and they are beautiful The garden is currently being cleared as I had really let it go over the past few weeks and haven't done anything at all so once that is done, I will get some spring veg put in and probably some more leaves. I still have job lots of food in store and our eating habits are sporadic at best so other than the usual toiletries and fresh items, we have no need to buy anything for a while. I have started to use much cheaper hair products which will save me a substantial sum over 12 months so I am hoping to reduce our grocery bill further

    Nothing else to report really...just keeping it going as much as I can
    MFW £3331.96/£22968.96
    • Cardew
    • By Cardew 6th Sep 17, 9:03 AM
    • 26,820 Posts
    • 12,997 Thanks
    Cardew
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-41158365
    • squirrelgirl
    • By squirrelgirl 23rd Sep 17, 3:33 PM
    • 111 Posts
    • 428 Thanks
    squirrelgirl
    Not a lot to report really....I have been given some pickled courgettes by a friend which will be lovely with some 'cheese', olives and seitan :D - my bread machine is not enormously healthy, but I can do it in the vitamix if I need to ;)

    I'm making haggis with parsnips, potatoes, swede and peas tomorrow.... I've got the grandbaby for a while and if he's hungry he can have all but the haggis as its a bit peppery! All of it is in the freezer so no additional work or cost involved :D I am working late most of this week so I will use up the soups in the freezer and anything else I can find -I want to defrost them both over the next two weeks so that I have some space for the autumn glut of produce that my friends are bound to have!;) I'm hoping for some tomatoes but will take whatever I'm lucky enough to be given!! :D

    I will start some more leaves indoors tomorrow...I really need to sort the wine soon too:o

    Anyhoo...hope you're having a fib weekend :D
    MFW £3331.96/£22968.96
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