Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • stonypaul
    • By stonypaul 18th Oct 16, 1:23 PM
    • 1Posts
    • 0Thanks
    stonypaul
    Extortionate ADT alarm charge
    • #1
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:23 PM
    Extortionate ADT alarm charge 18th Oct 16 at 1:23 PM
    I used to have a monitored alarm contract with ADT, but cancelled it some years ago.
    Recently it developed what seemed like a fault because it was beeping intermittently at all hours.
    So this was enough to keep everyone in the house awake so one night my wife had had enough so she rang ADT at 5.00 AM to ask them to sort it out as no one could sleep.
    So half an hour later an ADT engineer arrived to power down the system which took about 15 minutes.
    Then ADT sent me a bill for £537.60 incl VAT.
    This seems ridiculously high and now I'm wondering what to do next to dispute this invoice.
    Should I ring ADT, or go straight to a third party organisation?
    As it turned out the fault lay with BT as there was a fault on the line which caused an error when the unit in my house was trying to ring the mothership - ADT.
    So this poses another question. If the alarm wasn't being monitored then why would it try and dial out?
    Are BT liable here?
    Help!?

    Thank you!
Page 1
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 18th Oct 16, 1:47 PM
    • 8,685 Posts
    • 9,751 Thanks
    shaun from Africa
    • #2
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:47 PM
    • #2
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:47 PM
    Getting a service engineer from a large business out in the middle of the night is never going to be cheap. (Do a google to see how much an emergency plumber or electrician from a big company would charge).
    Did your wife ask for an estimate of the costs before agreeing for the engineer to come out or was there anything stated on their website showing this?

    The problem that you will likely have now is that BT will probably refuse any liability as there was a device connected to their line that wasn't getting serviced or inspected and unless you had specifically requested for ADT to disconnect the alarm when you cancelled the contract, they too will dispute any liability.
    • Rubidium
    • By Rubidium 18th Oct 16, 1:59 PM
    • 474 Posts
    • 270 Thanks
    Rubidium
    • #3
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:59 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:59 PM
    As it turned out the fault lay with BT as there was a fault on the line which caused an error when the unit in my house was trying to ring the mothership - ADT.
    So this poses another question. If the alarm wasn't being monitored then why would it try and dial out?
    Are BT liable here?
    Help!?

    Thank you!
    Originally posted by stonypaul
    A monitored alarm system that did not constantly check the phone line would be as much use as a chocolate fireguard. Surely common sense tells you that the alarm should sound if the line was cut or faulty.

    BT are not liable.
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 18th Oct 16, 2:12 PM
    • 877 Posts
    • 821 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #4
    • 18th Oct 16, 2:12 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Oct 16, 2:12 PM
    Unfortunately this is one of those examples where it's a really, really good idea to ask what the call-out charge is, before you get someone to attend site.

    I appreciate that this is of little help, and that does seem somewhat high. I'd probably call ADT and ask if it's correct.
    • Ant555
    • By Ant555 18th Oct 16, 4:31 PM
    • 552 Posts
    • 198 Thanks
    Ant555
    • #5
    • 18th Oct 16, 4:31 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Oct 16, 4:31 PM
    Surely common sense tells you that the alarm should sound if the line was cut or faulty.
    Originally posted by Rubidium
    The OP doesn't have a monitored alarm so there is no common sense in play here with regards to a phone line.
    He has an alarm system that used to be monitored but then became a simple non-monitored alarm (like most home alarm systems)
    • Ant555
    • By Ant555 18th Oct 16, 4:45 PM
    • 552 Posts
    • 198 Thanks
    Ant555
    • #6
    • 18th Oct 16, 4:45 PM
    • #6
    • 18th Oct 16, 4:45 PM
    As it turned out the fault lay with BT as there was a fault on the line which caused an error when the unit in my house was trying to ring the mothership - ADT.
    If the alarm wasn't being monitored then why would it try and dial out?
    Are BT liable here?
    !
    Originally posted by stonypaul
    I would suspect at the end of all this you will, at best, just get an amount discounted off the work that you asked them to do.

    Does the original contract (if you still have it) mention anything about what happens when the maintenance lapses? Is there an optional charge, for instance, to have an engineer come out and decommission or is it all remotely programmed?

    In reality your 'system' had a fault and it looks like someone simply switched it off and then on again at 5.30am as I am sure the ADT engineer didn't fix a BT fault.

    It could be that the backup battery failed or is getting low as I think they only last a few years - the engineer probably isolated the mains power and also disconnected the battery to do a reset. When the backup battery in my own non-monitored DIY alarm system starts to show signs of age then it does all sorts of weird things like going off at 3am! - Fortunately I know how to isolate the power if it goes off at 3am.
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 18th Oct 16, 4:50 PM
    • 8,685 Posts
    • 9,751 Thanks
    shaun from Africa
    • #7
    • 18th Oct 16, 4:50 PM
    • #7
    • 18th Oct 16, 4:50 PM
    The OP doesn't have a monitored alarm so there is no common sense in play here with regards to a phone line.
    He has an alarm system that used to be monitored but then became a simple non-monitored alarm (like most home alarm systems)
    Originally posted by Ant555

    But as the alarm appears to have still been connected up to the phone line then as far as far as the alarm control box is concerned, it would still be a monitored syatem and so if it senses a fault, a warning would be given.
    • phil24_7
    • By phil24_7 18th Oct 16, 5:56 PM
    • 1,267 Posts
    • 568 Thanks
    phil24_7
    • #8
    • 18th Oct 16, 5:56 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Oct 16, 5:56 PM
    Sounds like you got a bargain. It cost me £350 for a 1.45 hour call-out during the day!
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,627Posts Today

7,223Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • It's not fair or accurate to assign all leave voters (nor remainers) one voice. The vote may have been binary but t? https://t.co/QMqKrfY1jv

  • That's cos the UK voted for Brexit. The choice now unless something radical happens is what type. (Plus twitter o? https://t.co/SLmh2jL4bU

  • Todays twitter poll: The lib dem leader says more people now want soft brexit (ie still in single market etc) than hard - what do you want?

  • Follow Martin