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  • FIRST POST
    • Tombass10
    • By Tombass10 18th Oct 16, 12:42 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Tombass10
    Homebuyers survey - how concerned should I be?
    • #1
    • 18th Oct 16, 12:42 PM
    Homebuyers survey - how concerned should I be? 18th Oct 16 at 12:42 PM
    Hello,

    We are first time buyers looking to buy a Victorian conversion flat in greater London, built around 1910. The valuation has been approved by our mortgage provider but there are a few points on the survey which have been highlighted. The Home buyers survey was completed by E.surv. I would appreciate some guidance on what is serious, what is expected witht his type of property and what we can ignore, i.e. just the surveyor covering their backs, as I feel may be the case with the comments on the properties brand new windows below?

    First time I've posted on this forum and I would greatly appreciate words from anyone who knows more about this than myself!

    1) Rainwater Pipes and gutters
    Rainwater fittings are formed in a mix of the original cast iron and a more modern plastic material. There are some dated cast iron sections and some poor fixings to plastic downpipes. Repair is necessary. I recommend you obtain a report and quotation from a contractor for the work required.

    2) Main walls
    There are signs that the property has been affected by past structural movement as evidenced by cracking to wall surfaces particularly around openings. So far as can be seen from this single inspection, the movement appears to be longstanding and does not appear to be progressive. Seasonal movement may occur due to the nature of the sub-soil.

    The presence and location of a damp-proof course cannot be confirmed due to rendered elevations. Systematic checks for dampness to the inside face of external walls reveals none of significance in most areas. Dampness is present to the front, left side and rear elevations. Adjacent timbers may be affected by timber decay. Dampness is likely to areas concealed by dry lining and further specialist investigation is required.

    External ground levels are too high to rear elevations. Due to the nature of the surrounding ground the reduction of ground levels may be uneconomic and impractical.

    There are a number of poorly made good redundant and existing service holes to rear elevations, particularly to the rear flank elevation where there is a very large hole around the soil pipe which exits from the first floor flat.

    3) Windows
    Windows to the property are formed by uPVC double glazed sealed units. Sealed units are prone to failure causing misting between the glazing. Due to the weather conditions faulty units may not be apparent and future replacement should be anticipated. Legal adviser to establish if there is a guarantee.

    4) Walls and partitions
    There are signs that the property has been affected by past structural movement as evidenced by cracking to wall surfaces particularly around openings. So far as can be seen from this single inspection the movement appears to be long standing. It does not appear to be progressive. Seasonal movement may occur.

    Systematic checks for dampness to internal walls reveals none of significance in most areas. Damp readings were obtained from the separating wall between the front bedroom and bathroom and to the rear part of the right side party wall within the rear bedroom. Adjacent timbers may be affected by timber decay. Dampness is likely to areas concealed by dry lining and further specialist investigation is required.

    5) Floors
    Through ventilation beneath the timber ground floor is prevented by the raised external ground levels. Also, walls are damp and therefore sub-floor timbers built into or attached to the walls are susceptible to rot. A precautionary check of timbers (including under-floor areas) is essential.

    There is evidence of wood-boring beetle infestation to the underside of ground floor timbers when viewed from within the cellar and it is likely to have spread to concealed areas. The infestation appears recent.


    I thank anyone in advance for their help!

    Cheers,
    Tom
Page 1
    • G_M
    • By G_M 18th Oct 16, 1:32 PM
    • 37,021 Posts
    • 40,944 Thanks
    G_M
    • #2
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:32 PM
    • #2
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:32 PM
    Hello,

    1) Rainwater Pipes and gutters
    Rainwater fittings are formed in a mix of the original cast iron and a more modern plastic material. There are some dated cast iron sections and some poor fixings to plastic downpipes. Repair is necessary. I recommend you obtain a report and quotation from a contractor for the work required.
    I see no mention of whether the existing pipes/gutters are actually failing to work/leaking!
    If not, what's the problem? If so, it's not a major expense.
    Ignore.

    2) Main walls
    There are signs that the property has been affected by past structural movement as evidenced by cracking to wall surfaces particularly around openings. So far as can be seen from this single inspection, the movement appears to be longstanding and does not appear to be progressive. Seasonal movement may occur due to the nature of the sub-soil.
    So all seems good.
    If you are genuinely concerned, ask a Strural Engineer to inspect.
    I'd not bother.

    The presence and location of a damp-proof course cannot be confirmed due to rendered elevations.
    so dpc is probobly there.
    Systematic checks for dampness to the inside face of external walls reveals none of significance in most areas.
    all good
    Dampness is present to the front, left side and rear elevations. Adjacent timbers may be affected by timber decay. Dampness is likely to areas concealed by dry lining and further specialist investigation is required.
    How severe? Mould? Peeling paint/wallpaper? Smell?
    Or just a positive reading on a so-called 'damp meter'. Ring surveyor and ask.

    External ground levels are too high to rear elevations.
    Ah! That explains any damp at the rear
    Due to the nature of the surrounding ground the reduction of ground levels may be uneconomic and impractical.
    hard to believe - you can surely always dig a trench down beside the wall and support it with something. A weekend of digging?
    What is behind the property that makes this 'impractical.

    If concerned about, pay an independant damp surveyor for a report - NOT a damp proofing company.

    There are a number of poorly made good redundant and existing service holes to rear elevations, particularly to the rear flank elevation where there is a very large hole around the soil pipe which exits from the first floor flat.
    should e simple to 'make good'.

    Ah! Is this a flat?

    3) Windows
    Windows to the property are formed by uPVC double glazed sealed units. Sealed units are prone to failure causing misting between the glazing. Due to the weather conditions faulty units may not be apparent and future replacement should be anticipated. Legal adviser to establish if there is a guarantee.
    so nothing wrong with the windows at present.

    4) Walls and partitions
    There are signs that the property has been affected by past structural movement as evidenced by cracking to wall surfaces particularly around openings. So far as can be seen from this single inspection the movement appears to be long standing. It does not appear to be progressive. Seasonal movement may occur.see above

    Systematic checks for dampness to internal walls reveals none of significance in most areas. Damp readings were obtained from the separating wall between the front bedroom and bathroom and to the rear part of the right side party wall within the rear bedroom. Adjacent timbers may be affected by timber decay. Dampness is likely to areas concealed by dry lining and further specialist investigation is required.
    see above

    5) Floors
    Through ventilation beneath the timber ground floor is prevented by the raised external ground levels.
    see above. reduce the ground level with a trench and (if not there already) insert ventilation bricks.
    2nd weekend of work!
    Also, walls are damp and therefore sub-floor timbers built into or attached to the walls are susceptible to rot. A precautionary check of timbers (including under-floor areas) is essential.
    see above

    There is evidence of wood-boring beetle infestation to the underside of ground floor timbers when viewed from within the cellar and it is likely to have spread to concealed areas. The infestation appears recent.
    If genuinely recent, needs treatmet

    I thank anyone in advance for their help!

    Cheers,
    Tom
    Originally posted by Tombass10
    Is this a house or a flat?

    If a house, you can do a lot of repairs yourself at minimal cost. If a flat, you are dependant on the freeholder/management company undertaing repairs (at cost probobly shared between all flat-owners)
    • Tombass10
    • By Tombass10 18th Oct 16, 1:58 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Tombass10
    • #3
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:58 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:58 PM
    Hi G_M

    Your response is much appreciated!

    I can confirm it's a ground floor flat conversion.

    Kind Regards,
    Tom
    Last edited by Tombass10; 18-10-2016 at 3:14 PM.
    • Surrey_EA
    • By Surrey_EA 18th Oct 16, 2:08 PM
    • 582 Posts
    • 612 Thanks
    Surrey_EA
    • #4
    • 18th Oct 16, 2:08 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Oct 16, 2:08 PM
    At the risk of sounding pedantic:

    Hello,

    We are first time buyers looking to buy a Victorian conversion flat in greater London, built around 1910. The valuation has been approved by our mortgage provider but there are a few points on the survey which have been highlighted. The Home buyers survey was completed by E.surv. I would appreciate some guidance on what is serious, what is expected witht his type of property and what we can ignore, i.e. just the surveyor covering their backs, as I feel may be the case with the comments on the properties brand new windows below?
    Originally posted by Tombass10
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 18th Oct 16, 5:42 PM
    • 3,037 Posts
    • 2,692 Thanks
    Hoploz
    • #5
    • 18th Oct 16, 5:42 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Oct 16, 5:42 PM
    Edwardian?

    Freeholder is responsible for organising most of these repairs, cost shared between flats.

    Are you aware that the building generally looks in well-maintained condition or not?

    My question was going to be what floor ... First floor is laughing, but ground floor has a few issues affecting it which may or may not be costly, but tbh I'm more concerned as you won't be able to just carry out the work yourself, like if it were a house, as you won't actually own the building and therefore have no control.

    The main bit I don't like the sound of is the recent beetle infestation.

    Tbh think i might walk unless it's been a needle-in-haystack search.
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