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  • FIRST POST
    • AdventureRocks
    • By AdventureRocks 18th Oct 16, 11:54 AM
    • 115Posts
    • 10Thanks
    AdventureRocks
    New driver questions on clutch help please don't want to burn it out..
    • #1
    • 18th Oct 16, 11:54 AM
    New driver questions on clutch help please don't want to burn it out.. 18th Oct 16 at 11:54 AM
    I don't want to burn out my clutch and I am a little rusty on driving.

    So at traffic lights when waiting can I leave it in first with clutch down with brake on or is that bad for clutch?

    When breaking is putting the clutch all the way down and breaking at the same time bad? Should I break then put clutch in at last minute?

    Also on hill starts does everyone roll a little bit backwards? I am putting handbrake on building up revs then relasing hand break..

    Appreciate your help
Page 2
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 18th Oct 16, 2:34 PM
    • 12,041 Posts
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    AdrianC
    Like I said, if you're in first and you just take your foot off the clutch too quickly doesn't it stall?
    Originally posted by kmb500
    Yes. That's just the most basic clutch control that you'd have learnt immediately after first starting the engine. Without mastering that, you don't get the car to move in order to learn any more advanced skills...
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 18th Oct 16, 2:58 PM
    • 75 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    kmb500
    Woah that was weird. I just went for a quick drive. Braking without using the clutch down is VERY weird.
    Changing gear while braking... I found that very difficult, in terms of multitasking. It was like learning to drive again...
    Think I'll stick to my normal way of driving, although I'll try using the clutch less when braking gently.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 18th Oct 16, 3:07 PM
    • 12,041 Posts
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    AdrianC
    Braking without using the clutch down is VERY weird.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    Umm, no, it's normal - well, for everybody else, anyway.

    It was like learning to drive again...
    I think your last work is redundant. Or, maybe, we should just change it to "properly".

    Frankly, I'm very surprised that you passed your test if you drove during it as you describe now. How long ago was it? Did you go for a long period without driving, soon after passing?

    Changing gear while braking... I found that very difficult, in terms of multitasking.
    So don't. Do one thing at a time.

    You have MUCH more control of the car when the clutch is engaged, and you're in the right gear.
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 18th Oct 16, 3:18 PM
    • 75 Posts
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    kmb500
    Umm, no, it's normal - well, for everybody else, anyway.



    I think your last work is redundant. Or, maybe, we should just change it to "properly".

    Frankly, I'm very surprised that you passed your test if you drove during it as you describe now. How long ago was it? Did you go for a long period without driving, soon after passing?

    So don't. Do one thing at a time.

    You have MUCH more control of the car when the clutch is engaged, and you're in the right gear.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Passed 3 years ago, have driven pretty much every day since then. Had three different cars (Kia Rio, Fiat Panda, Mazda MX-5) and I have driven like this in all of them fine.
    I'm still in control of the car and I drive fine - I don't think it would have any effect on my test. Didn't get minors for it. My instructor never mentioned it to me, and my examiner didn't either.
    • AdventureRocks
    • By AdventureRocks 18th Oct 16, 3:29 PM
    • 115 Posts
    • 10 Thanks
    AdventureRocks
    I am learning so much on this thread very interesting, thanks everyone.

    Can anyone explain simply what riding the clutch means?
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 18th Oct 16, 3:32 PM
    • 12,041 Posts
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    AdrianC
    Can anyone explain simply what riding the clutch means?
    Originally posted by AdventureRocks
    Sitting with your foot on the pedal, but only lightly, so that it doesn't disconnect drive.

    The release bearing (thrust bearing) is then held in contact with the pressure plate, causing wear. If there's enough pressure on the pedal, then the clutch may actually slip.
    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 18th Oct 16, 3:37 PM
    • 5,435 Posts
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    GwylimT
    Passed 3 years ago, have driven pretty much every day since then. Had three different cars (Kia Rio, Fiat Panda, Mazda MX-5) and I have driven like this in all of them fine.
    I'm still in control of the car and I drive fine - I don't think it would have any effect on my test. Didn't get minors for it. My instructor never mentioned it to me, and my examiner didn't either.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    When you keep the clutch down when using the brake you aren't in as much control as you would be if you were braking properly by also going down gears, what you are doing also increases your stopping distance. Braking with the clutch down is coasting.
    • loskie
    • By loskie 18th Oct 16, 3:41 PM
    • 926 Posts
    • 528 Thanks
    loskie
    not sureof the cost of the course. My employer paid for it as part of their health and safety drive. All employees doing 10000m per annum plus for work had to do the half day course.
    Would be similar to this:
    https://www.iamroadsmart.com/courses/drive-check-plus

    focussed on economy and safer driving. My instructor was ex Traffic Police. Easy to get on with, encouraged the driver tomake progress as well as hone their observation skills.
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 18th Oct 16, 3:47 PM
    • 75 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    kmb500
    When you keep the clutch down when using the brake you aren't in as much control as you would be if you were braking properly by also going down gears, what you are doing also increases your stopping distance. Braking with the clutch down is coasting.
    Originally posted by GwylimT
    How does that slow the brakes / increase stopping distance?


    I move the gearstick into the appropriate gear when I am braking, so that if I have to take my foot off then the car will be in the right gear. I just don't actually do a full change, just keep the clutch down all the time.
    • arcon5
    • By arcon5 18th Oct 16, 3:55 PM
    • 12,698 Posts
    • 7,990 Thanks
    arcon5
    Doesn't sound like your driving any differently to most drivers out there tbh. I wouldn't worry too much about what your doing i.e. Traffic lights with clutch down and coasting. It won't kill it in days
    • chrisw
    • By chrisw 18th Oct 16, 3:55 PM
    • 1,447 Posts
    • 760 Thanks
    chrisw
    Passed 3 years ago, have driven pretty much every day since then. Had three different cars (Kia Rio, Fiat Panda, Mazda MX-5) and I have driven like this in all of them fine.
    I'm still in control of the car and I drive fine - I don't think it would have any effect on my test. Didn't get minors for it. My instructor never mentioned it to me, and my examiner didn't either.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    I'm not sure if this post is serious or not but coasting is dangerous, will cause excessive wear on the car and used excessively, will fail the driving test.

    http://www.drivingtesttips.biz/what-is-coasting.html
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 18th Oct 16, 3:58 PM
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    AdrianC
    How does that slow the brakes / increase stopping distance?
    Originally posted by kmb500
    It may well cause the drive wheels to lock more quickly.
    It will certainly reduce the control you have while cornering, by changing the balance of the car.
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 18th Oct 16, 4:01 PM
    • 75 Posts
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    kmb500
    It may well cause the drive wheels to lock more quickly.
    It will certainly reduce the control you have while cornering, by changing the balance of the car.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Why would I be braking round a corner?
    • kmb500
    • By kmb500 18th Oct 16, 4:02 PM
    • 75 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    kmb500
    I'm not sure if this post is serious or not but coasting is dangerous, will cause excessive wear on the car and used excessively, will fail the driving test.

    http://www.drivingtesttips.biz/what-is-coasting.html
    Originally posted by chrisw
    this evidently not true given that I passed first time and not once did I do what you guys are telling me to.
    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 18th Oct 16, 4:03 PM
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    GwylimT
    How does that slow the brakes / increase stopping distance?


    I move the gearstick into the appropriate gear when I am braking, so that if I have to take my foot off then the car will be in the right gear. I just don't actually do a full change, just keep the clutch down all the time.
    Originally posted by kmb500
    Because you aren't braking properly! You're preventing engine braking which decreases stopping distance compared to coasting.
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 18th Oct 16, 4:03 PM
    • 994 Posts
    • 908 Thanks
    DoaM
    OK, let's go back a step or three...

    The clutch connects the engine to the gearbox.
    The gearbox gives you a choice of ratios between the speed of the engine and the speed of the wheels.
    The only time you do not want the engine and gearbox connected is when you are changing gear, or you are stationary and in gear. The rest of the time, you should choose the right gear for the road speed and conditions.

    The accelerator pedal is the main way you adjust your road speed. You use it to increase your speed, you use it to decrease your speed, you use it to keep your speed steady.
    The brake pedal is a fall-back for when you need to decrease your speed more rapidly than simply easing off the accelerator will allow. If you're driving smoothly and your observation is adequate, then you will rarely need it except at low speeds.

    If you are within a range of road speeds for which a particular gear is suitable, then get off the clutch.
    If you are accelerating or slowing, then use the clutch to change gear at appropriate times. But, apart from that, get off the clutch.
    If you are decelerating to a gentle halt, then change gear as you go, and use the clutch when the speed drops below first gear's acceptable speeds - as you come to a halt, in other words. But, apart from that, get off the clutch.
    If you are braking hard to a rapid halt, then the same, but you won't have time to slow through the gears, so the speed at which you use the clutch will be higher. But, apart from that, get off the clutch.

    This is the sort of stuff your instructor would have covered in your first few driving lessons, quite probably in a nice quiet car park or industrial estate with very little traffic, and you would have mastered before you started learning how to play with other traffic.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    I'm astounded you even needed to explain that to a (supposedly) qualified driver.
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
    • bsod
    • By bsod 18th Oct 16, 4:03 PM
    • 1,057 Posts
    • 645 Thanks
    bsod
    go for a drive with your dad

    the odds of having a poor instructor and a poor tester and a dad that doesn't ask wtf are you doing must be astronomical
    Last edited by bsod; 18-10-2016 at 4:07 PM.
    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 18th Oct 16, 4:04 PM
    • 5,435 Posts
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    GwylimT
    Why would I be braking round a corner?
    Originally posted by kmb500
    Traffic, something blocking your way, a pot hole there are many reasons why braking on a bend or corner is sometimes needed.
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 18th Oct 16, 4:06 PM
    • 994 Posts
    • 908 Thanks
    DoaM
    How many people here would be comfortable driving an old car where you needed to double de-clutch to change gears?
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 18th Oct 16, 4:07 PM
    • 12,041 Posts
    • 10,438 Thanks
    AdrianC
    I'm astounded you even needed to explain that to a (supposedly) qualified driver.
    Originally posted by DoaM
    I wish I was.

    Depressed, yes. Surprised, no.
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