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    • Skleppy
    • By Skleppy 17th Oct 16, 10:04 PM
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    Skleppy
    CCJs after 6 years. Need help.
    • #1
    • 17th Oct 16, 10:04 PM
    CCJs after 6 years. Need help. 17th Oct 16 at 10:04 PM
    Hi,

    I have 2 CCJs from almost 6 years ago. The debt has been repaid but not the legal fees. Because it was so long ago, I don't know which solicitors hold the accounts now to be able to pay them. I know that debt gets sold on and that has happened several times with these 2 accounts. I have spoken to the County Court and they were able to give me the names of the original solicitors but on speaking to them, they don't seem to have a record of the debts any more and who they sold it on to. How can I pay these legal fees? Also, what happens to the CCJ and remaining debt (i.e. the legal fees) after 6 years? Thanks for any help!
Page 1
    • Marktheshark
    • By Marktheshark 17th Oct 16, 10:09 PM
    • 5,317 Posts
    • 6,667 Thanks
    Marktheshark
    • #2
    • 17th Oct 16, 10:09 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Oct 16, 10:09 PM
    A ccj is between two parties only.
    Brexit will become whatever they invent it to be.
    • sourcrates
    • By sourcrates 17th Oct 16, 10:37 PM
    • 8,306 Posts
    • 8,133 Thanks
    sourcrates
    • #3
    • 17th Oct 16, 10:37 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Oct 16, 10:37 PM
    You would only be liable for the judgement balance via the original CCJ.

    After 6 years they would have to take you to court again for the legal fees.

    Are you been actively chased for these debts ?
    Last edited by sourcrates; 17-10-2016 at 11:13 PM.

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  • National Debtline
    • #4
    • 18th Oct 16, 10:16 AM
    • #4
    • 18th Oct 16, 10:16 AM
    Hi Skleppy,


    The legal fees realistically form part of the judgement, so you would be better to simply think of it as money outstanding on a CCJ. The creditor doesn't have to sue you again for these fees, but I think sourcrates is trying to say that if the judgement is more than 6 years old and no enforcement has taken place in the 6 years since then the creditor will need special permission from the court to enforce the outstanding balance.


    The judgement will come off your file 6 years from the date of judgement whether it is paid or not. I would suggest a letter to the original claimant (sometimes you can get a more positive response to a letter), asking formally for details of who the debt was sold to from them. Then follow the trail until you get to the correct collector.


    Laura
    @natdebtline
    We work as money advisers for National Debtline and have specific permission from MSE to post to try to help those in debt. Read more information on National Debtline in MSE's Debt Problems: What to do and where to get help guide. If you find you're struggling with debt and need further help try our online advice tool My Money Steps
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