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  • FIRST POST
    • msg2004
    • By msg2004 17th Oct 16, 6:01 PM
    • 13Posts
    • 1Thanks
    msg2004
    Changing my work days permanently
    • #1
    • 17th Oct 16, 6:01 PM
    Changing my work days permanently 17th Oct 16 at 6:01 PM
    Hi

    Just had a shell shock today. I work 44hrs Mon to Friday and have done so for 20 yrs.
    I was told today that in order to save overtime money paid to other staff that work Saturdays. I have to work Tuesdays to Saturdays permanently as opposed to my current pattern of Mon to Friday.

    I'm a supervisor and not done Saturday working for more than several years ie overtime.

    I have grown up kids that work and off the weekend just like my husband.

    Up until Christmas, I have to travel to Leeds from Brum every Saturday to see my husbands grandmother as she is elserly, very frail and ill, we support my husbands mum to help around the home, help with gran and give them moral support.

    Not sure what my contract says but not worth the paper written on

    Would it be unreasonable for me to ask for a notice period of at least until after Chirstmas as we have a couple of weddings before then as well

    I will work most Saturdays after Christmas as we need the money cant afford to lose my job.

    The firm employs about 600 people at my place and another 600 around the uk

    I was shocked when it was pt to me and there were 4 others in the meeting so all I said was that I'd talk to my family as i was caught off guard.

    Thanks

    Thanks
Page 1
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 17th Oct 16, 8:00 PM
    • 4,855 Posts
    • 6,370 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    • #2
    • 17th Oct 16, 8:00 PM
    • #2
    • 17th Oct 16, 8:00 PM
    Are you a member of a union?
    What does your contract say about your days/hours of work?
    Are you the only one being asked to hcange your hours, or are others being told the same? If it is only you, did you employers give any explanation for that?

    You may find the ACAS leaflet about changes to contracts helpful.

    http://www.acas.org.uk/media/pdf/q/k/Varying-a-contract-of-employment-Acas-leaflet.pdf
    • Sanne
    • By Sanne 17th Oct 16, 8:28 PM
    • 308 Posts
    • 291 Thanks
    Sanne
    • #3
    • 17th Oct 16, 8:28 PM
    • #3
    • 17th Oct 16, 8:28 PM
    I agree, it depends on the contract... I work Monday - Friday but my contract says "37.5 hours Monday - Saturday" so, in my case, a change in working pattern such as yours would be fine.

    Is there maybe a colleague who could help out in the next few weeks by swapping shifts (assuming there are more people in you're position with different work patterns?)
    • msg2004
    • By msg2004 17th Oct 16, 8:36 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    msg2004
    • #4
    • 17th Oct 16, 8:36 PM
    • #4
    • 17th Oct 16, 8:36 PM
    Thanks to both of you.

    It's a permanent thing. I think the contract covers everything ie not worth the written paper.
    The other supervisors told to do the same

    If I refuse as I have been there 20 yrs, will the company have to give me 12 weeks notice ie a week for every yr I have worked there and max weeks allowed is 12 weeks?
    Thanks again, off to bed as feleling sick
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 17th Oct 16, 10:02 PM
    • 2,735 Posts
    • 4,277 Thanks
    sangie595
    • #5
    • 17th Oct 16, 10:02 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Oct 16, 10:02 PM
    Thanks to both of you.

    It's a permanent thing. I think the contract covers everything ie not worth the written paper.
    The other supervisors told to do the same

    If I refuse as I have been there 20 yrs, will the company have to give me 12 weeks notice ie a week for every yr I have worked there and max weeks allowed is 12 weeks?
    Thanks again, off to bed as feleling sick
    Originally posted by msg2004
    Theoretically, yes. But please note the word "notice". Because that is exactly what it is - notice to terminate your employment. Now, the likelihood is that they won't dismiss you. For this. But if you "stand on ceremony" over this, don't expect a single "favour" ever again from your employer. That isn't an enviable position to be in.

    I know these things matter to you. Quite rightly. So don't get me wrong. But your employer doesn't care about your husbands grandmother or his mums need for moral support. Or weddings. And you don't have any legal rights to these things.

    So you need to approach this as a negotiation. What can you give if they give something back? Truth to tell, you are better offering solutions to problems rather than problems. They already have a problem, so giving them more problems won't endear you to them. Find them a solution and its more likely to get you somewhere.
    • msg2004
    • By msg2004 18th Oct 16, 7:05 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    msg2004
    • #6
    • 18th Oct 16, 7:05 PM
    • #6
    • 18th Oct 16, 7:05 PM
    Many thanks Sangie

    I am aware that it will mean the boot, but to work saturdays, every Saturday after so many years of not doing this is not cricket.

    Thank you again
    • Andypandyboy
    • By Andypandyboy 18th Oct 16, 7:19 PM
    • 2,297 Posts
    • 5,860 Thanks
    Andypandyboy
    • #7
    • 18th Oct 16, 7:19 PM
    • #7
    • 18th Oct 16, 7:19 PM
    Theoretically, yes. But please note the word "notice". Because that is exactly what it is - notice to terminate your employment. Now, the likelihood is that they won't dismiss you. For this. But if you "stand on ceremony" over this, don't expect a single "favour" ever again from your employer. That isn't an enviable position to be in.

    I know these things matter to you. Quite rightly. So don't get me wrong. But your employer doesn't care about your husbands grandmother or his mums need for moral support. Or weddings. And you don't have any legal rights to these things.

    So you need to approach this as a negotiation. What can you give if they give something back? Truth to tell, you are better offering solutions to problems rather than problems. They already have a problem, so giving them more problems won't endear you to them. Find them a solution and its more likely to get you somewhere.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    Actually, if the OP provides care to a relative with a disability they can as for flexible working under the "associative disability" criteria. The employer is not bound to agree ( or make reasonable adjustments) but if they don't they have to say why and they have to be sure they have not allowed another employee doing the same job or similar job to so for other reasons eg childcare etc. If they have the OP would have a case for discrimination.
    • msg2004
    • By msg2004 18th Oct 16, 8:35 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    msg2004
    • #8
    • 18th Oct 16, 8:35 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Oct 16, 8:35 PM
    Thanks

    For clarification, if I refuse to work Tue to Sat, week in, week out as opposed to my regular days Mon to Sat for 20 yrs, are they obliged to give me 12 weeks notice to quit as i have worked there and worked damn hard for 12 years?
    • Nicki
    • By Nicki 18th Oct 16, 8:54 PM
    • 7,415 Posts
    • 26,032 Thanks
    Nicki
    • #9
    • 18th Oct 16, 8:54 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Oct 16, 8:54 PM
    I'm possibly missing something here but why can't you get together with your children on Sundays and go see the elderly relative on Monday? I doubt she's working on weekdays. I get you'd rather have Saturday and Sunday rather than Sunday and Monday off but you're still getting 2 consecutive days one a weekend day so would you really rather be unemployed than have this?
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 18th Oct 16, 9:21 PM
    • 2,735 Posts
    • 4,277 Thanks
    sangie595
    Actually, if the OP provides care to a relative with a disability they can as for flexible working under the "associative disability" criteria. The employer is not bound to agree ( or make reasonable adjustments) but if they don't they have to say why and they have to be sure they have not allowed another employee doing the same job or similar job to so for other reasons eg childcare etc. If they have the OP would have a case for discrimination.
    Originally posted by Andypandyboy
    True. But they don't. The husbands mother does! That is very clear in the OP. They choose to travel to see an elderly granny who is cared for by mum in Manchester. A bit of helping out for a few hours and moral support is not a caring role.

    OP, I appreciate it isn't cricket. But cricket is a game and this is employment. The employer has put forward a business case in relation to costs. That is almost inevitably a winning argument. You can refuse. Nobody can force you to work. But if you do, the employers response is likely to be that you are resignin. Now toy could attempt a tribunal claim. And if you are brave, then go for it. But your husband works so there will be nice fee remission. That's £1250 in fees straight away. There's no legal aid. So unless in you are a union that will fight this, or have legal insurance to back you up, you'll have to go it alone. Then you will have to depend upon fortune - either the employer settles, or you win your case. Either way toy will do this from being unemployed.

    That isn't a reason to capitulate. It's a reason to be fully informed about the risk you take. Then you decide.
    • msg2004
    • By msg2004 19th Oct 16, 5:36 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    msg2004
    Cheers Sangie

    I will stick to our no Saturday working - if it was the odd Saturday, then may have done it. Going to write the the CEO and thank the fool for treating us like this after 20 years of dedicated employment . i will keep it polite as he may actually help, but my mind is made up.Thanks again
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