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  • FIRST POST
    • rebeccak
    • By rebeccak 16th Oct 16, 7:40 PM
    • 115Posts
    • 28Thanks
    rebeccak
    Installing a stopcock
    • #1
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:40 PM
    Installing a stopcock 16th Oct 16 at 7:40 PM
    I live in (and own) a flat on the top floor of a small block of flats. The only stopcock for my flat is outside the building (and in an emergency would involve negotiating a few flights of stairs and 4 locked doors/gates/cupboards!) The pipes do divide into separate pipes for each flat at that initial entry point so I do have my own stopcock.

    How much would it cost to have an additional stopcock within my flat? How can I find out where the water supply first enters the flat? The kitchen is a bit nearer to where the stopcocks/pipes first enter the building on the ground floor - but the boiler is in the bathroom so does that mean that the water supply first enters through the bathroom and into the boiler?
Page 1
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 16th Oct 16, 7:46 PM
    • 912 Posts
    • 1,116 Thanks
    Mr.Generous
    • #2
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:46 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:46 PM
    the only people who would know are either the architect or the plumber who did the job, it could come in anywhere. Consider fitting lever turn ball valves to each tap / connection as and when you work on them. If water pressure is not really good use full bore valves.

    choose from here:

    http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Plumbing/d20/Valves/sd2696

    I like lever turn for an emergency shut off, but we fit isolation valves to every component, its good practice.
    • tacpot12
    • By tacpot12 16th Oct 16, 7:47 PM
    • 373 Posts
    • 302 Thanks
    tacpot12
    • #3
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:47 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:47 PM
    You won't be able to use logic to determine where the supply enters your flat! I'd suggest you map out where all the pipe are (you never know when this might be handy for another reason, so keep a copy) and see if you can see where the cold pipe might be entering the flat. Once you have some candidate routes, you might be able to ask the owner of the flat beneath yours if you could look to see if any of the routes have or haven't got pipes running to them. You might need to drill some holes into the walls of your flat and use and endoscope to look into them, but look to see if there are any access hatches anywhere in your flat you might even find a stoptap!

    Installing a new stopcock should be a simple job for a plumber and cost less than £150.
    Last edited by tacpot12; 16-10-2016 at 7:52 PM.
    • Chanes
    • By Chanes 16th Oct 16, 8:03 PM
    • 604 Posts
    • 345 Thanks
    Chanes
    • #4
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:03 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:03 PM
    To do this wouldn't the supply need to be turned off from the outside valve and if true, wouldn't the neighbours of the block need to be given notice of when and how long? They might like the idea too (I would) and take advantage to have their own stop-tap fitting.
    • Marktheshark
    • By Marktheshark 16th Oct 16, 8:06 PM
    • 5,335 Posts
    • 6,679 Thanks
    Marktheshark
    • #5
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:06 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:06 PM
    Depends what the supply pipe is made from, plastic can be clamped and copper can be frozen whilst it is fitted.
    Brexit will become whatever they invent it to be.
    • Chanes
    • By Chanes 16th Oct 16, 8:10 PM
    • 604 Posts
    • 345 Thanks
    Chanes
    • #6
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:10 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:10 PM
    Depends what the supply pipe is made from, plastic can be clamped and copper can be frozen whilst it is fitted.
    Originally posted by Marktheshark
    Ah, I didn't know that! Just as well I ain't a plumber.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 17th Oct 16, 10:10 AM
    • 5,280 Posts
    • 4,055 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    • #7
    • 17th Oct 16, 10:10 AM
    • #7
    • 17th Oct 16, 10:10 AM
    To do this wouldn't the supply need to be turned off from the outside valve and if true, wouldn't the neighbours of the block need to be given notice of when and how long? They might like the idea too (I would) and take advantage to have their own stop-tap fitting.
    Originally posted by Chanes
    From the OP. " The pipes do divide into separate pipes for each flat at that initial entry point so I do have my own stopcock."

    My stoptap was replaced a few years ago which involved turning off the water to other flats. It took about 10 minutes to replace the tap. If the pipes need cutting it should take no more than 20? minutes. To fit stoptaps in neigboring flats should be cheaper if all are done at the same time. Suggest it to your neighbours.
    Too cool for school. Also too old for school.
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