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  • FIRST POST
    • h_and_p_uk
    • By h_and_p_uk 16th Oct 16, 7:11 PM
    • 7Posts
    • 6Thanks
    h_and_p_uk
    Fellow Worker Issue
    • #1
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:11 PM
    Fellow Worker Issue 16th Oct 16 at 7:11 PM
    Hello

    Apologies as I am new to this forum, so hope I am posting in the correct part.

    I have been working for a company for just over a year, and have recently been moved to a new role, which is basically call centre work. It's going a lot better than I thought, and my so-called "stats" are higher than most of the other workers, many of whom have been there for years. However, I am having problems with a fellow team member.

    He has an annoying habit of scaring me by shouting into my ear as he walks by. Last week he also started jabbing me in the ribs with his fingers as I answered a call, which I found both annoying and upsetting.

    My team leader, and many of my fellow workers, think that this person is hilarious, and seem to hang on his every word. I personally feel upset and aggrieved that they find it amusing that I am jumping out of my skin while I am trying to concentrate on my work.

    I don't feel comfortable in the role, and was wondering if there are any employment laws which can help an individual in this situation.

    Sorry for rambling, but hope all this makes sense.
Page 1
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 16th Oct 16, 7:20 PM
    • 5,724 Posts
    • 4,258 Thanks
    ohreally
    • #2
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:20 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:20 PM
    However, I am having problems with a fellow team member.

    He has an annoying habit of scaring me by shouting into my ear as he walks by. Last week he also started jabbing me in the ribs with his fingers as I answered a call, which I found both annoying and upsetting
    Originally posted by h_and_p_uk
    Next time it happens, ensure you jump in alarm at his antics while accidently ramming his nuts/ jaw with your fist.
    Imagination is a mental faculty that serves as a coping mechanism for those who can't or won't accept reality - unicorns and dragons and wives who don't nag, are all figments of the "imagination".

    Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank and he can rob the world.
    • Takeaway_Addict
    • By Takeaway_Addict 16th Oct 16, 7:23 PM
    • 5,389 Posts
    • 6,084 Thanks
    Takeaway_Addict
    • #3
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:23 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:23 PM
    Hello

    Apologies as I am new to this forum, so hope I am posting in the correct part.

    I have been working for a company for just over a year, and have recently been moved to a new role, which is basically call centre work. It's going a lot better than I thought, and my so-called "stats" are higher than most of the other workers, many of whom have been there for years. However, I am having problems with a fellow team member.

    He has an annoying habit of scaring me by shouting into my ear as he walks by. Last week he also started jabbing me in the ribs with his fingers as I answered a call, which I found both annoying and upsetting.

    My team leader, and many of my fellow workers, think that this person is hilarious, and seem to hang on his every word. I personally feel upset and aggrieved that they find it amusing that I am jumping out of my skin while I am trying to concentrate on my work.

    I don't feel comfortable in the role, and was wondering if there are any employment laws which can help an individual in this situation.

    Sorry for rambling, but hope all this makes sense.
    Originally posted by h_and_p_uk
    You need to just tell him to stop doing it in a decisive manner.

    Ultimately after that you may have to decide raising a grievance against this person
    Don't trust a forum for advice. Get proper paid advice. Any advice given should always be checked
    • h_and_p_uk
    • By h_and_p_uk 16th Oct 16, 7:32 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    h_and_p_uk
    • #4
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:32 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:32 PM
    I've tried to tell him that I don't find it funny, and asked him to stop. He retaliated by saying I was being miserable. I'm finding it a strain as I'm actually very good at the job, but this is really bringing me down.

    While I understand that there would be grievance procedures, I'm interested to know if there are any employment laws concerning workplace intimidation, as I really need to know where I stand.
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 16th Oct 16, 7:33 PM
    • 874 Posts
    • 1,023 Thanks
    Mr.Generous
    • #5
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:33 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:33 PM
    tell him you don't find it funny and if he continues you will formally complain. He sounds like a right laugh - in the sense that he is a moron.
    • h_and_p_uk
    • By h_and_p_uk 16th Oct 16, 7:36 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    h_and_p_uk
    • #6
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:36 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:36 PM
    Strangely my closest friend in work uses that very same word to describe him

    I'm only reluctant to go down the complaint route due to this individual's popularity with my fellow workers.
    • Takeaway_Addict
    • By Takeaway_Addict 16th Oct 16, 7:58 PM
    • 5,389 Posts
    • 6,084 Thanks
    Takeaway_Addict
    • #7
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:58 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:58 PM
    Then be more forceful next time he does it and if you do raise a grievance don't immediately start quoting law...it will rile HR up when not required
    Don't trust a forum for advice. Get proper paid advice. Any advice given should always be checked
    • McKneff
    • By McKneff 16th Oct 16, 8:02 PM
    • 34,737 Posts
    • 44,730 Thanks
    McKneff
    • #8
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:02 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:02 PM
    He is probably a lot less popular than you think, they are probably just grateful that he is not picking on them while he has got you in his sites.

    He is a bully, that's it
    No one can make you feel inferior without your consent
    • ERICS MUM
    • By ERICS MUM 16th Oct 16, 8:08 PM
    • 3,161 Posts
    • 5,934 Thanks
    ERICS MUM
    • #9
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:08 PM
    • #9
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:08 PM
    Are you male or female ?
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 16th Oct 16, 8:16 PM
    • 2,735 Posts
    • 4,276 Thanks
    sangie595
    I've tried to tell him that I don't find it funny, and asked him to stop. He retaliated by saying I was being miserable. I'm finding it a strain as I'm actually very good at the job, but this is really bringing me down.

    While I understand that there would be grievance procedures, I'm interested to know if there are any employment laws concerning workplace intimidation, as I really need to know where I stand.
    Originally posted by h_and_p_uk
    Even if there are laws, and actually, the law on this is hazy, you would first have to go down a grievance route.

    I would suggest that a bright big smile and telling him that you don't give a flying f**k what his opinion of you is, but he tries it again and he will be explaining assault to HR and the police. If he thought you were a serious threat to him then he'd have stopped. He didn't, so he doesn't. Until you are, you are going to continue being his target.
    • h_and_p_uk
    • By h_and_p_uk 16th Oct 16, 8:19 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    h_and_p_uk
    Are you male or female ?
    Originally posted by ERICS MUM
    I'm actually male, which probably makes me sound a bit ridiculous. However I'm just someone who wants to just get on with my job in a professional and mature manner.
    • h_and_p_uk
    • By h_and_p_uk 16th Oct 16, 8:21 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    h_and_p_uk
    Even if there are laws, and actually, the law on this is hazy, you would first have to go down a grievance route.

    I would suggest that a bright big smile and telling him that you don't give a flying f**k what his opinion of you is, but he tries it again and he will be explaining assault to HR and the police. If he thought you were a serious threat to him then he'd have stopped. He didn't, so he doesn't. Until you are, you are going to continue being his target.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    Thanks. The thought of using that phrase cheers me up no end
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 16th Oct 16, 8:29 PM
    • 2,735 Posts
    • 4,276 Thanks
    sangie595
    Thanks. The thought of using that phrase cheers me up no end
    Originally posted by h_and_p_uk
    Copyright sangie595! But go for it. You don't need to shout. You don't need to be aggressive. The best threats are issued coldly. And meant! Bullies know their targets. Seriously. They never pick on "the wrong person". You need took make yourself that wrong person.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 16th Oct 16, 9:19 PM
    • 2,635 Posts
    • 2,539 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    Slam your chair backwards at him. Apologise by saying it's an automatic reaction to shock.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 16th Oct 16, 9:21 PM
    • 13,655 Posts
    • 33,141 Thanks
    elsien
    Strangely my closest friend in work uses that very same word to describe him

    I'm only reluctant to go down the complaint route due to this individual's popularity with my fellow workers.
    Originally posted by h_and_p_uk
    Then if they find it so hilarious, suggest that he does it to them instead. Then they can enjoy the joke together and leave you well out of it.

    They probably don't find him hilarious at all, they're just laughing heartily so he picks on you instead of them.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Missus Hyde
    • By Missus Hyde 16th Oct 16, 9:48 PM
    • 220 Posts
    • 308 Thanks
    Missus Hyde
    I've tried to tell him that I don't find it funny, and asked him to stop. He retaliated by saying I was being miserable.
    Originally posted by h_and_p_uk
    Of course you could acquire a clown costume, wait until he leaves work, jump out on him and scare the !!!! out of him. Then when he complains, suggest that he's the one being miserable, as you found it hilarious!!
    "I'll scweam and scweam and make mythelf thick" ......Violet Elizabeth Bott
    It's soooo unfair!!......Kevin the Teenager
    Now what does that remind me of? )


    It's a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known........Sydney Carton.
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 16th Oct 16, 11:55 PM
    • 4,483 Posts
    • 5,645 Thanks
    theoretica
    I've tried to tell him that I don't find it funny, and asked him to stop. He retaliated by saying I was being miserable.
    Originally posted by h_and_p_uk
    I would have agreed with him and told him not to bother miserable boring people who want to work in work.
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • dori2o
    • By dori2o 17th Oct 16, 12:23 AM
    • 7,021 Posts
    • 11,791 Thanks
    dori2o
    If he is indeed shouting down your ear then this is a health and safety issue.

    As you work in a call centre your employer should be fully aware of 'Acoustic Shock'.

    This is where a loud or high pitched sound is heard down the telephone line and into your ears. This can cause several hearing issues ranging from tinnitus right through to deafness.

    Your employer should have a procedure which enables you to report instances of Acoustic Shock.

    Whilst this isn't strictly 'Acoustic Shock', shouting directly into your ear can have the same consequences and it can lead to various hearing issues.

    If your employer is fully aware of what this idiot is doing and seem happy for him to continue doing so then they are stupid, as it leaves them wide open to an industrial injuries claim, and it leaves him wide open also to being charged with assault should he cause damage to your ears.

    I would have a quiet word with your manager. Bring up the issue of Acoustic Shock and explain that what he is doing is very similar.

    Alternatively follow the process for reporting acoustic shock and ensure you details exactly what happens, including date, time, witnesses etc.

    Once you hand this to your manager etc they will have no choice but to investigate.

    Your employer has a duty of care to you whilst you are in work to ensure that you are provided a safe working environment (This not only includes physical safety but also protection from bullying, which this is a form of). It is my opinion that by allowing this idiot to do this they are failing this duty.

    One last question. Does he do this whilst you are actively on the phone with customers? If so it's highly unprofessional, and not only will he be shouting into your ears but the microphone on your headset will also pick up the noise.

    If this shouting is loud enough then Acoustic Shock will be a factor for the customer and you should report this to management.

    If you believe you cannot report this to your own manager as they find these antics to be funny then I suggest you bypass your manager and follow the necessary processes to take this complaint to your managers manager.
    Last edited by dori2o; 17-10-2016 at 12:27 AM.
    To equate judgement and wisdom with occupation is at best . . . insulting.
    • ERICS MUM
    • By ERICS MUM 17th Oct 16, 4:20 AM
    • 3,161 Posts
    • 5,934 Thanks
    ERICS MUM
    I'm actually male, which probably makes me sound a bit ridiculous. However I'm just someone who wants to just get on with my job in a professional and mature manner.
    Originally posted by h_and_p_uk
    Sorry, didn't mean to offend. I asked because employers should step in where sexual harassment is suspected/alleged.
    • dickydonkin
    • By dickydonkin 17th Oct 16, 4:38 AM
    • 2,786 Posts
    • 2,802 Thanks
    dickydonkin
    Are you allowed drinks at your desk?

    If so, I would suggest that as he approaches you, ensure the cup of drink is in your hand (obviously filled to the rim) - preferably hot) and I'm sure the shock of the shouting/poking in ribs could/will direct the contents of the receptacle over the idiot.

    On a more serious note, I am surprised that this clown has not been reprimanded - particularly in a call centre environment where customers could hear his stupid party piece. It is unprofessional at best.

    Personally, (although I do not condone violence), I would put his lights out.

    If he is indeed shouting down your ear then this is a health and safety issue.
    Originally posted by dori2o
    I would suggest more of a harassment issue.

    There would be no health and safety issue if the actions of this clown was addressed. As with any H&S hazard, eliminating the source of potential of harm is top of the hierarchy of controls - in this case, remove the idiot - problem solved!
    Last edited by dickydonkin; 17-10-2016 at 4:55 AM.
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