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  • FIRST POST
    • barnstar2077
    • By barnstar2077 16th Oct 16, 2:17 PM
    • 3Posts
    • 0Thanks
    barnstar2077
    One chilly room!
    • #1
    • 16th Oct 16, 2:17 PM
    One chilly room! 16th Oct 16 at 2:17 PM
    Hi,

    I have one room in my house that feels several degrees colder than the others. It is an upstairs bedroom that shares a wall with my neighbour, as my place is semi detached. I have insulation in the loft above, both between the rafters and back over the top perpendicular to the rafters. I also have secondary glazing in that room. The radiator in their is okay at best, but even when the room is heated to toasty levels it seems to lose the heat quicker than the other rooms! The only thing I can think of is that it hasn't been decorated in over ten years. I know it sounds ridiculous, but could ceiling paint that is peeling in places really make a room lose it's heat so quickly?

    Thanks,
    Barn
Page 1
    • Nick_C
    • By Nick_C 16th Oct 16, 2:23 PM
    • 2,474 Posts
    • 3,261 Thanks
    Nick_C
    • #2
    • 16th Oct 16, 2:23 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Oct 16, 2:23 PM
    Most likely explanation is that your neighbour doesn't heat the adjoining room.

    You could look at internal insulation on the party wall.
    • somethingcorporate
    • By somethingcorporate 16th Oct 16, 2:58 PM
    • 8,698 Posts
    • 8,422 Thanks
    somethingcorporate
    • #3
    • 16th Oct 16, 2:58 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Oct 16, 2:58 PM
    Paint won't make any difference. I agree with the above poster, you could insulate your side of the wall for a couple of hundred quid and upgrade the rad if it's small.
    Thinking critically since 1996....
    • barnstar2077
    • By barnstar2077 16th Oct 16, 6:28 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    barnstar2077
    • #4
    • 16th Oct 16, 6:28 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Oct 16, 6:28 PM
    Thank you for your replies, which product should I use to insulate the wall?
    • DRP
    • By DRP 16th Oct 16, 7:24 PM
    • 3,895 Posts
    • 3,365 Thanks
    DRP
    • #5
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:24 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:24 PM
    I would get a new, bigger radiator.

    Would be cheaper, less disruptive, and would work - rather than guessing that interior wall insulation might fix the problem.
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 16th Oct 16, 7:30 PM
    • 874 Posts
    • 1,022 Thanks
    Mr.Generous
    • #6
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:30 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:30 PM
    look for gaps and cracks anywhere letting a draft in, just below window ledge, around skirting, poor fitting windows? These are things you rectify when decorating so could be the cause. If the adjoining wall feels really cold you can get polystyrene wall liner to go under wallpaper, it used to be called warmaline I think. B&Q do it near wallpaper section.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 16th Oct 16, 7:31 PM
    • 34,052 Posts
    • 142,351 Thanks
    silvercar
    • #7
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:31 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Oct 16, 7:31 PM
    As you are a semi-detached there most be other rooms that have more outside walls than the problem one. Even if the neighbour isn't heating their room, the fact it isn't an outside wall should provide more insulation than an outside wall. So more likely it is the radiator that is either not heating properly (sludged up, not balanced or end of the run?) or too small for the room.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 16th Oct 16, 8:12 PM
    • 682 Posts
    • 1,237 Thanks
    FreeBear
    • #8
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:12 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:12 PM
    If the adjoining wall feels really cold you can get polystyrene wall liner to go under wallpaper, it used to be called warmaline I think. B&Q do it near wallpaper section.
    Originally posted by Mr.Generous
    Toolstation do the Wallrock thermal paper - General opinion is that it is barely worthwhile as it adds little in the way of insulation to a wall.
    So many cats, so few good recipes.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.

    £2 Savers Club (No. 73) - £226 ______ £1 jar - £207
    • ComicGeek
    • By ComicGeek 16th Oct 16, 9:09 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    ComicGeek
    • #9
    • 16th Oct 16, 9:09 PM
    • #9
    • 16th Oct 16, 9:09 PM
    Depending on the age of the houses, it may be a cavity party wall between the two houses - these were traditionally left unfilled and unsealed. End result is that you then have cold air circulating in the cavity.

    Your bedroom (and your neighbour's bedroom) then essentially has an uninsulated wall which makes it so much colder.

    If you can bear losing some space in the room, best way is to be install insulation internally on this party wall - either insulation packed between timber battens with plasterboard over, or an insulated plasterboard product from Celotex, Kingspan, Gyproc etc
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