Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • WelshWanderer
    • By WelshWanderer 15th Oct 16, 8:10 PM
    • 9Posts
    • 79Thanks
    WelshWanderer
    Budgeting/food advice please :)
    • #1
    • 15th Oct 16, 8:10 PM
    Budgeting/food advice please :) 15th Oct 16 at 8:10 PM
    Hello lovely OldStylers,

    I'm in a bit of a quandary at the moment. I've recently moved into my own place after escaping a very abusive and controlling relationship. To the point that managing on my own is a complete revelation! I'd had no say in financial matters so even getting my name on the bills has been a huge achievement. I'm enjoying being at peace but I seriously need to learn how to budget! There have been a lot of outgoings this month and I've unexpectedly been left with £40 in my bank account. I get paid in two weeks so I'm hoping it'll be enough to last until then. I still need to be very sensible as it's been too easy to overspend recently!

    I did spend quite a bit on staples at Lidl so I have:

    Beans
    Cheese
    Potatoes
    Carrots
    Peppers
    Stock cubes
    Spaghetti
    Pasta
    Tomato pur!e
    Tea/coffee
    Bread
    Wraps
    Fajita seasoning mix (25p a pack from Lidl, seems better than buying too many spices at this point. Ok I admit it - I'm a lazy git )
    Bananas
    Biscuits
    Cereal

    I'm vegetarian so I won't need to buy meat. I'm also allergic to fish and eggs so there's some more saving there! oh and I'm teetotal.. that should help, right? If anyone can suggest meal ideas (preferable super easy as I struggle with PTSD, depression and anxiety and every task is horribly difficult) I'd be so very grateful.

    I'm on a water, leccy and gas meter. I'm finding it all so confusing. I need the heating on a couple of hours a day or my joints flare up. I don't know where to start saving. I'm trying not to feel too overwhelmed with everything so please lend me your words of support.

    Thank you in advance.
Page 1
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 15th Oct 16, 8:56 PM
    • 55,986 Posts
    • 321,723 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    • #2
    • 15th Oct 16, 8:56 PM
    • #2
    • 15th Oct 16, 8:56 PM
    Your shopping list is very similar to the stuff I shuffle in and randomly grab

    I also gravitate towards their 15 eggs for £1

    Lots of options there.

    Beans on toast. Cheese/beans on toast. Cheese on toast.
    Baked potato (microwave is quickest/easiest) topped with beans, or cheese, or cheese & beans.
    Cheese & potato pie: cook/mash the spuds, mix in a fistful of cheese (cut small/grated) - serve as cheesy mash with beans, or stick it in a dish and shove in the oven/under the grill to brown for 15 minutes or so before serving with beans.

    There's not a lot really to say about the rest of what you've got - you can just lob random items into a pot and call it dinner.....

    Not much there to stick in the wraps though .... so those and the spaghetti will sit, untouched, in the cupboard as you stare at them and think "that wasn't a good choice really, but they're handy to have in the cupboard".

    You probably could do with building up some "wrap filling ideas that keep for ages in the cupboard, are cheap and are tasty". What you stick in them will depend on what you like to eat though, they can be funny things to try to fill at times.
    • pinkypig
    • By pinkypig 15th Oct 16, 9:10 PM
    • 431 Posts
    • 4,875 Thanks
    pinkypig
    • #3
    • 15th Oct 16, 9:10 PM
    • #3
    • 15th Oct 16, 9:10 PM
    You could try tortilla pizzas using your wraps. Spread with tomato pur!e and grated cheese ( and any other bits you like as toppings) and grill. Be careful though, they cook quick and are easy to burn
    Congratulations on your new found independence and the very best of luck for the future.
    PP x
    Oct GC. £136.25/ £140
    Nov GC. £202.02/£160
    Dec.GC. £29.92/£200
    • Larumbelle
    • By Larumbelle 15th Oct 16, 10:24 PM
    • 2,085 Posts
    • 10,273 Thanks
    Larumbelle
    • #4
    • 15th Oct 16, 10:24 PM
    • #4
    • 15th Oct 16, 10:24 PM
    Hello WelshWanderer

    As someone who has been in a similar situation, I just wanted to give you a big virtual hug and well done! I was 17 when my own abusive relationship started, and in my early 30s when I finally got out. The only way I could really describe it was like living one of those movies where the character goes to bed a teenager and wakes up an adult with a job and home and life but a big gap where all of the 'adulting' skills should be. Unless you have been in that situation it is hard to understand how scary it is, or what an achievement it feels like to have all the bills in your own name and control over your finances (even if there is no finances to speak of and everything that comes in goes straight back out again LOL). The good news is that you pick up most of those 'adulting' skills quite quickly!

    Are you getting any practical support? I struggled along without any for a long time convincing myself that I didn't need it, but now I have some I realise that I should have sought some out, it has made a huge difference to me.

    Congratulations on getting your freedom, I am so pleased for you! It does get easier, remember to be kind to yourself and please PM me if you ever want to chat xxxx


    • pollyanna 26
    • By pollyanna 26 15th Oct 16, 11:00 PM
    • 919 Posts
    • 7,510 Thanks
    pollyanna 26
    • #5
    • 15th Oct 16, 11:00 PM
    • #5
    • 15th Oct 16, 11:00 PM
    Welcome to WW . Well done on escaping a toxic relationship , I escaped a violent and mentally abusive marriage years ago and can tell you the only way is up now !
    You might like to consider some pulses and beans in your shopping , lentils are cheap and excellent for veggie diet . You don't have much in the way of protein there and as you don't eat eggs you need to make sure your diet contains balanced ingredients .
    I am sure tomorrow you will be given more advice . As you struggle healthwise you may like to also join us over on the os and poor health thread . I still haven't mastered posting links - still shocked I managed to start a thread ! I see Larumbelle has replied to you and she's over there with us and has yummy ideas for food and a lot of positive ways of coping .
    polly x
    • Ladyluck1
    • By Ladyluck1 16th Oct 16, 8:57 AM
    • 747 Posts
    • 7,236 Thanks
    Ladyluck1
    • #6
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:57 AM
    • #6
    • 16th Oct 16, 8:57 AM
    Id buy some kidney beans and make bean fajitas with the peppers, tom pur!e, beans and some fajita seasoning.
    You could make a big batch of the fajita bean mix up and freeze some or have leftovers for lunch.

    Cheese and potato bake with beans.

    Would buy onions/leeks and broccoli and make a big batch of veggie soup.
    I'm C, Mummy to DS 29/11/2010 and DD 02/11/2013

    Overdraft PAID OFF
    CC PAID OFF
    GC Sept £141.17/200
    • newgirly
    • By newgirly 16th Oct 16, 9:40 AM
    • 5,217 Posts
    • 35,918 Thanks
    newgirly
    • #7
    • 16th Oct 16, 9:40 AM
    • #7
    • 16th Oct 16, 9:40 AM
    Do you have a slow cooker? It saves standing over the hob and you can prepare stuff when is easiest for you and switch it on later or even the next day. I bought one recently in Asda for £7, it might be something to think about for the future, it uses a lot less energy and is time saving. I do bean curries/chillis as I'm veggie too, I love it. Anyway best of luck fo he future
    MFW 21
    Target for 2016 £30,000 \ £72,350.11 paid so far

    Mortgage £63,080 5 yrs 8 months left. Total owed £92,893.96.

    Weight loss 2016 - 18.25 lb lost 40lb target
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 16th Oct 16, 9:41 AM
    • 9,509 Posts
    • 21,163 Thanks
    suki1964
    • #8
    • 16th Oct 16, 9:41 AM
    • #8
    • 16th Oct 16, 9:41 AM
    First off, well done for getting yourself in a safe place.

    Take some time to heal, don't be too hard on yourself. Budgeting is a skill that needs to be learned and that takes time and experience

    Keeping a roof over your head is priority. Food then heating. Then everything else.

    I too get painful joints when I get cold but I live in a huge house which I really can't justify heating all day with just me indoors so I layer up with the clothes and use lap blankets. I've even put on fingerless gloves if I'm sat just reading. I have the heating on for an hour in the morning so the bathrooms and kitchen are warm, then a couple of hours in the evening, going off around 9pm No need to heat during the night when snuggled in bed

    Food is fuel and will help you keep warm. I'm hopeless with veggi suggestions, my go to are curries and dhalls - cheap and cheerful and making a big pot in one go, it's easy reheated

    I'm also a fan of HM soup.

    Going back to your budget. Get a wee notebook, write down your income per month then under that deduct your rent, rates, gas, elec, water. Whatever is left is what you have to play around with, fares, food, phone, tv, entertainment, toiletries, clothes, holidays, gifts, haircuts, insurances and savings.

    As long as you don't spend more then what's coming in you are doing ok. Keeping to that is the hard part,,that's where time and experience comes in

    So this month you have had a shock at finding you only have £40 to get to the end of the month, we have all been there, but already you have realised you can't spend so much next month, already you are budgeting

    Good luck , keep posting, ask for all the help you need xx
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • t14cy t
    • By t14cy t 16th Oct 16, 10:10 AM
    • 819 Posts
    • 4,908 Thanks
    t14cy t
    • #9
    • 16th Oct 16, 10:10 AM
    • #9
    • 16th Oct 16, 10:10 AM
    well done ww!! i had similar relationship, but have come out of the fog, so to speak!!! agree with all the other posters here. you have come to the right help for both practical and emotional support. onward and upward. look forward to your postings. xxx
    • pollyanna 26
    • By pollyanna 26 16th Oct 16, 11:01 AM
    • 919 Posts
    • 7,510 Thanks
    pollyanna 26
    WW Lots of good advise already . One thing I noticed is you don't have any tinned tomatoes on that list . They are so useful in veggie soups , stews etc .
    It would help if you could describe what cooking and food storage facilities you have . As already mentioned batch cooking is one of the best ways to reduce energy use both financially and physical . Having access to some freezer space helps have something to hand when you are in pain . The slow cooker is the os answer to the world , the universe and everything !!!
    I am another who keeps track of the bills the paper and pen way . I use a spiral A4 pad with a page for each month . Once you have done it for a while it becomes second nature . As said already the money you owe is priority and then the rest can be worked with .
    Across os there are many threads on eating well on very little money .
    There used to be a sticky at the top of the os board - Squeaky's os index and I've just realised it isn't there now . Maybe ZIPPY or someone can point us in the right direction . I was thinking of Ginghams long running vegetarian thread .
    Anyway lots online and student recipes can be good as they tend to be very frugal and speedy .
    polly
    • Mohawk
    • By Mohawk 16th Oct 16, 12:14 PM
    • 66 Posts
    • 124 Thanks
    Mohawk
    Well done, Welshwanderer. You've done the hard bit.

    If I understand you correctly, there are two parts to your query. One is general budget advice, and the other is a request for tips to help you through the next fortnight on £40 plus what you've already bought from Lidl. When you say you are on the gas, water and leccy meters, does that mean the gas and electricity are pre-paid? If so, you need to put some money aside to make sure you don't run out of that before pay day.

    Assuming no other big costs, you've got enough to see you through a fortnight, even if you might have to eat a little bit like a student until pay day.

    My tip would be to buy some red lentils and make a big batch of lentil soup. It doesn't take that long to cook, so doesn't use much fuel, and you can store that for a few days in the fridge, and reheat what you need to have with bread, and you've got one substantial, cheap, veggie meal that is perfect for this time of year and also a decent source of protein for a veggie. You'll find recipes for it on here, and you already have most of the ingredients!

    As you are starting from scratch, your big challenge might be having the right container to store it in, but maybe a friend, neighbour or colleague can donate an old ice-cream tub?

    In the longer-term, you are right that being a veggie will reduce your meat costs, but please make sure you don't stint too much on protein. You can fill yourself up with starchy foods in the short-term, but protein gives longer lasting energy, which may be particularly vital if you have other health problems.

    I second the suggestion of investing in a slow cooker once your finances allow. It will allow you to do the cooking at a time that suits you, with meals becoming ready when you need them. They aren't just for stews, but great for lentil and pulses.

    If you have a freezer, I suggest getting some frozen spinach, which is a convenient, and economical way to add flavour and nutrition to a tomato sauce or soup. The fresh stuff is nice in salads, but a waste of money and effort the rest of the time.
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 16th Oct 16, 12:58 PM
    • 2,857 Posts
    • 5,203 Thanks
    jackyann
    Adding my congratulations to taking control of your life.
    I'd add: even if you don't have access to freezer, space, you can do "roll over" dishes - a small amount of left-over lentil bake can be mashed up into a jacket potato and topped with cheese, for example.
    Try to have a very simple standby - a bake in the freezer (if you have one) or a couple of cans. That way, if the day has panned out badly, or the pennies have run out,you have the makings of a quick, cheering meal.
    If you do have a freezer, stash a few slices of bread so you can always do toast.
    This is one of my favourite standbys, a version ofcorn chowder, usually made with a few bacon bits (mis-shapes or the very end of a gammon joint) but can be great without meat:
    In oil or butter, brown some potatoes (it's a good use for left over potatoes of any kind, or use a small can). Add a can of sweet corn. Extra liquid can be vege stock, milk, a bit of a mix, or for real luxury you can swirl in a bit of cream / creme fraiche. Season with paprika, salt & pepper. If you have a bit of cheese, cut into small cubes & drop in (smoked cheese is especially good)
    This is also comfort food, and when you are feeling fragile, something comforting to eat, especially something as inexpensive as this can make you feel lots better!
    • thriftwizard
    • By thriftwizard 16th Oct 16, 2:32 PM
    • 2,185 Posts
    • 26,974 Thanks
    thriftwizard
    Well done you for escaping, and coping. And that's probably a better store-cupboard stash than my student son will have bought himself to last the next two weeks! However he's not veggie, but one of my daughters is. Thinking about what she likes to eat, I think I'd add chickpeas, dried (cheaper) if you can be organised enough to soak them in advance, tinned if not, eggs, & onions; it takes minutes to chop an onion, mash some chick peas, add some spice (why not fajita spice?) & bind with an egg to make falafels, which will last several days in the fridge once cooked. She also roasts chick-peas & eats them in salads, and adds them to stir-fries along with green leaves (a cabbage doesn't cost a lot & keeps well in a cool place if wrapped in its own outer leaves) peppers & onions, which she'd have with noodles, rice or bulgur wheat, all inexpensive. We have been organised enough to grow our own sprouting beans on the windowsill to add to stir-fries & salads for optimum nutrition, but not very often! But sometimes "score" some at the local greengrocers reduced to 50p just before 5pm.

    She has in the past suffered with low iron levels, which can contribute hugely to depression and anxiety. Hence the emphasis on leafy green veg, which, along with lentils & other pulses, contribute a fair bit of iron to the diet. And she uses an old cast-iron pan, acquired for pennies at a car boot sale, which also adds traces of usable iron to her diet, and has satisfied the doc that she can keep her iron levels up without supplements, which has also helped her moods to stabilise. You are what you eat, but it doesn't have to cost a fortune!
    Angie

    GC 09/16 - £519.18/£520 GC 10/16 - £548.92/£500 GC Nov 16 - £536.73/£520
    GC 12/16 - £238.50/£550- now feeding 4 adults, 2 cats, 2 cockatiels and 11 chickens


    Money's just a substitute for time & talent...
    • joedenise
    • By joedenise 16th Oct 16, 3:16 PM
    • 4,447 Posts
    • 29,298 Thanks
    joedenise
    Have a look at the cooking on a bootstrap website written by Jack Monroe. There are loads of cheap veggie & vegan meals on there. I'm not veggie but use several of her recipes.

    Agree with others that it would be good for you to buy some beans, chickpeas & lentils as you have little protein in what you've bought so far. I'd also add tomatoes to the list of tinned foods, they are useful in so many dishes.

    Denise
    • WelshWanderer
    • By WelshWanderer 17th Oct 16, 3:58 AM
    • 9 Posts
    • 79 Thanks
    WelshWanderer
    Wow - thank you so much for your replies and wonderful suggestions. I'm feeling quite overwhelmed with your kindness.

    I'll try to reply to everyone, I'm sorry if I miss anyone out.

    PasturesNew - There are some great (easy!) ideas there, I appreciate them very much. Thank you.

    PinkyPig - aw thank you lovely being independent is both terrifying and exhilarating! Tortilla pizzas sound fab. Guess what's on the menu today? :P

    Larumbelle Thank you for the hugs, they've been very gratefully received. I'm sorry you went through this awful situation but feeling so so glad you've come out of it a fighter. I'll PM you once I've got my head together - could be a while.

    Pollyanna 26 - I bought some split red lentils and split yellow peas so hopefully that'll help me with the protein intake. It wouldn't do to neglect my health at this stage. I'll be along to join you on the other thread, it sounds like something I need. Thank you.

    I'll reply to everyone else later, this is about as much as my energy allows right now. Thank you all so much! I'm feeling quite positive and ready to face a new week.
    • Katzen
    • By Katzen 17th Oct 16, 7:29 AM
    • 499 Posts
    • 1,604 Thanks
    Katzen
    How about 'Italian soup'? Carrots and peppers simmered off a bit (onions and celery next time too), solider of Tom pur!e fried off, top up with stock then break some spaghetti in. In wealthier times, a tin of butter beans, sprinkle of dried time in there then fresh basil in top and Parmesan cheese at the end. But for now, a way to use that spaghetti up and the veggies of you have any looking sad by the end of the week.
    Second the Cooking On A Bootstrap website, great for balanced and healthy meals.
    Good luck
    • Poppy3008
    • By Poppy3008 17th Oct 16, 12:06 PM
    • 54 Posts
    • 326 Thanks
    Poppy3008
    Would you eat Quorn? If so you have a lot of choice with meals and its great protein though it is pricey. I think all the advice here has been great with regards keeping your protein levels up. Tins of tomatoes are a must as said earlier - I cannot live without them! Budgeting is hard - I still struggle and I have been independently shopping for a very long time and still get things wrong. Veg stock cubes are useful. And don't forget - the cheap cheap budget stuff is often as nice as branded. I bought the basics baked beans in Mr T the other day - delicious! If you have a freezer you will def make your life easier. I often make a cake (and using a packet mix is fine if its easier!) and when cool cut it up and freeze the potions so I have a tasty sweet cheap treat when wanted/needed. (The good news is that you can replicate the same spongy texture without the use of eggs. Eggs can be replaced with mashed bananas, applesauce, vinegar with baking soda, yogurt and silken tofu, depending on the recipe. Eggless cakes can be tricky, but they don't always have to be fussy or complicated) - taken from internet as I know you are allergic to eggs but don't let that stop you having cake!! I have cooked with yoghurt/sour cream/applesauce and bananas alot - its all good!
    Don't forget charity shops and car boot sales sell cake tins and baking/cooking equipment all the time when your budget allows. And check out the charity shops for quilts or blankets (the home made kind if prefered) as often these are donated and very warm for when sitting on the sofa. Or on the bed. Maybe even look out for a hot water bottle.
    On a final note - well done on your new found independence. Onwards and upwards!!!
    • WelshWanderer
    • By WelshWanderer 17th Oct 16, 12:18 PM
    • 9 Posts
    • 79 Thanks
    WelshWanderer
    Have a look at the cooking on a bootstrap website written by Jack Monroe. There are loads of cheap veggie & vegan meals on there. I'm not veggie but use several of her recipes.

    Agree with others that it would be good for you to buy some beans, chickpeas & lentils as you have little protein in what you've bought so far. I'd also add tomatoes to the list of tinned foods, they are useful in so many dishes.

    Denise
    Originally posted by joedenise
    I've been browsing the site you mentioned and it's fantastic! I've bookmarked it and will read more later. Thank you. I also bought chickpeas today.

    How about 'Italian soup'? Carrots and peppers simmered off a bit (onions and celery next time too), solider of Tom pur!e fried off, top up with stock then break some spaghetti in. In wealthier times, a tin of butter beans, sprinkle of dried time in there then fresh basil in top and Parmesan cheese at the end. But for now, a way to use that spaghetti up and the veggies of you have any looking sad by the end of the week.
    Second the Cooking On A Bootstrap website, great for balanced and healthy meals.
    Good luck
    Originally posted by Katzen
    This sounds delicious, I can't wait to try it. Thank you for writing out the whole recipe for me.

    Would you eat Quorn? If so you have a lot of choice with meals and its great protein though it is pricey. I think all the advice here has been great with regards keeping your protein levels up. Tins of tomatoes are a must as said earlier - I cannot live without them! Budgeting is hard - I still struggle and I have been independently shopping for a very long time and still get things wrong. Veg stock cubes are useful. And don't forget - the cheap cheap budget stuff is often as nice as branded. I bought the basics baked beans in Mr T the other day - delicious! If you have a freezer you will def make your life easier. I often make a cake (and using a packet mix is fine if its easier!) and when cool cut it up and freeze the potions so I have a tasty sweet cheap treat when wanted/needed. (The good news is that you can replicate the same spongy texture without the use of eggs. Eggs can be replaced with mashed bananas, applesauce, vinegar with baking soda, yogurt and silken tofu, depending on the recipe. Eggless cakes can be tricky, but they don't always have to be fussy or complicated) - taken from internet as I know you are allergic to eggs but don't let that stop you having cake!! I have cooked with yoghurt/sour cream/applesauce and bananas alot - its all good!
    Don't forget charity shops and car boot sales sell cake tins and baking/cooking equipment all the time when your budget allows. And check out the charity shops for quilts or blankets (the home made kind if prefered) as often these are donated and very warm for when sitting on the sofa. Or on the bed. Maybe even look out for a hot water bottle.
    On a final note - well done on your new found independence. Onwards and upwards!!!
    Originally posted by Poppy3008
    Ooh yes I do like quorn.

    Unfortunately my freezer is a tiny box crammed into the under-counter fridge! I plan to scour freecycle and selling sites for a bigger one as soon as my budget allows. I know it'll save so much money. There's only so many times I can eat the same meal lol and cooking a small amount seems a waste of energy!
    I'm pleased to announce that strangely, I'm not allergic to disguised eggs. be they in biscuits or cakes! Things like quiche and omelette are out of the question though. It's weird.
    • Katzen
    • By Katzen 17th Oct 16, 3:40 PM
    • 499 Posts
    • 1,604 Thanks
    Katzen
    You're very welcome, hope it's tasty enough. If you only have a tiny freezer then don't bother with dried chickpeas as they take an hour+ of boiling, fine if you can do in bulk but energy costly if only doing a portion or two. Look out for tins on 3 for £1 offers and always go down the 'ethnic' aisle in big supermarkets as they are often far cheaper than own brand ones sold in the tinned veg aisle.
    I would suggest dried red lentils though, add a handful to most soups for for added thickness and protein.
    • Nomoonatall
    • By Nomoonatall 17th Oct 16, 3:49 PM
    • 1,132 Posts
    • 2,883 Thanks
    Nomoonatall
    Hello lovely OldStylers,

    I'm in a bit of a quandary at the moment. I've recently moved into my own place after escaping a very abusive and controlling relationship. To the point that managing on my own is a complete revelation! I'd had no say in financial matters so even getting my name on the bills has been a huge achievement. I'm enjoying being at peace but I seriously need to learn how to budget! There have been a lot of outgoings this month and I've unexpectedly been left with £40 in my bank account. I get paid in two weeks so I'm hoping it'll be enough to last until then. I still need to be very sensible as it's been too easy to overspend recently!

    I did spend quite a bit on staples at Lidl so I have:

    Beans
    Cheese
    Potatoes
    Carrots
    Peppers
    Stock cubes
    Spaghetti
    Pasta
    Tomato pur!e
    Tea/coffee
    Bread
    Wraps
    Fajita seasoning mix (25p a pack from Lidl, seems better than buying too many spices at this point. Ok I admit it - I'm a lazy git )
    Bananas
    Biscuits
    Cereal

    I'm vegetarian so I won't need to buy meat. I'm also allergic to fish and eggs so there's some more saving there! oh and I'm teetotal.. that should help, right? If anyone can suggest meal ideas (preferable super easy as I struggle with PTSD, depression and anxiety and every task is horribly difficult) I'd be so very grateful.

    I'm on a water, leccy and gas meter. I'm finding it all so confusing. I need the heating on a couple of hours a day or my joints flare up. I don't know where to start saving. I'm trying not to feel too overwhelmed with everything so please lend me your words of support.

    Thank you in advance.
    Originally posted by WelshWanderer
    Good luck, Welsh Wanderer!

    Your list is looking good..personally I'd add onions and tinned tomatoes. Flour is very useful too! If you have freezer space...stickered bread or even breadcrumbs. Soya mince is a blessing! Don't forget veg oil or marg!

    I wish you well x
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

731Posts Today

5,708Users online

Martin's Twitter