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  • FIRST POST
    • dazza-mac
    • By dazza-mac 15th Oct 16, 3:30 PM
    • 260Posts
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    dazza-mac
    Dads home care
    • #1
    • 15th Oct 16, 3:30 PM
    Dads home care 15th Oct 16 at 3:30 PM
    Hi everyone,


    I don't know if I've posted in the right place but...


    Dad lives in an 'extra care sheltered accommodation flat'. It's an Anchor property that has carers who work on site from Age UK.


    The problem is that dad is meant to have 3 showers a week. He's an amputee 85 year old in a wheelchair. His showers constantly get bumped due to a lack of staff on shift. What can I do? I keep telling them that dad needs his showers but it just keeps on happening. Half the time they don't even come along to inform him or apologize. Dad won't say anything!!


    I know it's not the girls' fault. They can't help how many are on shift so it's a difficult situation as the 'Team Leader' has finished her shift by the time dad is meant to have his shower, then just fobs me off saying it won't happen again - it does!.


    Dad got one shower last week and that was a day late. The way I see it Age UK got the contract as they said they could provide a service - but they're not.


    Is there anything I can do apart from bang my head off the wall. Are Anchor in any way responsible or is my argument purely with Age UK. Is it Anchor that gave Age UK the contract or would that have been the local council/social services


    I am going to contact the Head of Care from Age UK, but any other advice would be gratefully received. Thank you.
    Last edited by dazza-mac; 15-10-2016 at 3:40 PM.
Page 1
    • Nicki
    • By Nicki 15th Oct 16, 4:34 PM
    • 7,415 Posts
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    Nicki
    • #2
    • 15th Oct 16, 4:34 PM
    • #2
    • 15th Oct 16, 4:34 PM
    I don't completely understand the relationships here. Does your dad pay for his care and accommodation or towards it? If he does, who does he pay? That's the person you should be addressing the complaint to because that's the person who your dad has a contractual relationship with. If he doesn't pay for his care, then I think you should be taking this up with social services rather than either Anchor or Age Uk.

    In addition to all this though, it may be worth making a complaint to the CQC about the lack of care provided. Have a look at their website here http://www.cqc.org.uk

    Finally, you could write to the local councillor covering the area or the local MP and ask if they can ask some difficult questions
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 15th Oct 16, 6:12 PM
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    kingfisherblue
    • #3
    • 15th Oct 16, 6:12 PM
    • #3
    • 15th Oct 16, 6:12 PM
    Is it an Extracare flat in a village run by the charity Extracare? Anchor are presumably the local social housing. I'm not sure where Age UK come in, though, as Extracare employ their own staff. In the village where my daughter works, Social Services assess how much care is needed for each resident. I'm continuing this post on the assumption that it is an Extracare village.

    There should be a care plan in your dad's flat, stating what calls are needed each day, which days his showers are due, etc. Staff should be completing paperwork each time they access the flat - even if it is to say that your dad is not there. This paperwork can then be checked against his care plan.

    Your first contact should be with the Head of Care. You should request a reason why your dad is not being showered on the days that his care plan states. If it is lack of staff, then ask who is funding your dad's care, as you wish to take up the matter with them - this should hopefully get things moving. It would be wise to know who is providing the funding anyway. I would also ask for a copy of the Complaints Procedure - even if you don't use it, it is there for your to refer to if you want to instigate a formal complaint in the future.

    If it is an Extracare village, here is the link to their website - there are lists of their villages and schemes, so if you're not sure, you might be able to find the name of your dad's scheme here:

    www.extracare.org.uk/

    I can ask my daughter for further advice if you need me to - just let me know. She will know their policies far better than me.
    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 16th Oct 16, 11:34 AM
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    margaretclare
    • #4
    • 16th Oct 16, 11:34 AM
    • #4
    • 16th Oct 16, 11:34 AM
    Where does your Dad have his showers - in his own flat? Has he got a properly adapted bathroom with wheelchair access and a seat in the shower? What about hand-rails?

    We had our bathroom completely re-done earlier this year and there is a possibility that my DH may end up with above-knee amputation.

    I've just had revision of total hip replacement and I think I'd die if I couldn't have my daily shower via level access shower cubicle. Bliss!
    r ic wisdom funde, r wear ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 17th Oct 16, 5:13 PM
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    deannatrois
    • #5
    • 17th Oct 16, 5:13 PM
    • #5
    • 17th Oct 16, 5:13 PM
    It may be a bit like a situation with my son, who has ASD. The National Autistic Society are an autism charity, but also provide PA/carer services. Unfortunately when they were approached by my son's social worker, we found their service to be much higher in cost than other agencies, and they were very inflexible. Their being a charity with a good reputation doesn't necessarily mean all their paid for services are the best for their client group. We ended up going elsewhere.
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 17th Oct 16, 8:55 PM
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    kingfisherblue
    • #6
    • 17th Oct 16, 8:55 PM
    • #6
    • 17th Oct 16, 8:55 PM
    Where does your Dad have his showers - in his own flat? Has he got a properly adapted bathroom with wheelchair access and a seat in the shower? What about hand-rails?
    Originally posted by margaretclare
    If it is an Extracare flat, I think all of them have wetrooms with level access showers, shower seating and handrails. The village where my daughter works was custom built and all flats and bungalows are built to the same standard.
    • Saffagal
    • By Saffagal 17th Oct 16, 9:32 PM
    • 664 Posts
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    Saffagal
    • #7
    • 17th Oct 16, 9:32 PM
    • #7
    • 17th Oct 16, 9:32 PM
    If Dad's care is self-funded (he pays for it himself or you on his behalf) then you need to speak to the manager of the care provider who you are paying to provide a service.

    If the care is funded, or part funded, by Social Services then you need to get onto the local SS and speak to a care manager to file a complaint against the agency for not adhering to the care plan.

    It will be really helpful if you have a copy of his care plan and the dates when the plan is not being followed. The reasons why don't really matter - the care plan is what is deemed as the basic level of care to meet Dad's needs and needs to be adhered to.
    • Saffagal
    • By Saffagal 17th Oct 16, 9:34 PM
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    Saffagal
    • #8
    • 17th Oct 16, 9:34 PM
    • #8
    • 17th Oct 16, 9:34 PM
    Just an additional point, how many staff does Dad need when he is showering? If it is a single carer then it is inexcusable. If it is a double care visit, then (and I may be speaking completely out of turn as don't know how Dad transfers) has he had a recent assessment by an Occupational Therapist to ensure that he has the necessary equipment that he needs which may enable his showers to be safely managed by a sole carer.
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 18th Oct 16, 11:12 AM
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    TBagpuss
    • #9
    • 18th Oct 16, 11:12 AM
    • #9
    • 18th Oct 16, 11:12 AM
    Is Dad happy for you to deal with this on his behalf? I am not sure how far you can take it if he doesn't want to pursue it.

    If he is happy for you to deal with it, get him to give you written authority stating that the care co. etc. can discuss the matter with you.

    Then write keeping a copy of the letter, to the company with whom he has the contract.

    Try to keep it as clear and factual (not emotional) as you can.

    Set out specifically
    - what the contract / care plan says about number of visits / showers
    - what has actually been happening (as this is a recurring problem, I would probably do a bulleted list of the past 4-6 weeks setting out the dates on which visits were supposed to take place, when they actually took place, and when visits were cancelled (with him being informed) or people simply failed to attend.

    Then be clear about what you want to happen now (i.e. confirmation that he will get the appropriate number of visits and that in the event a visit is not possible, that he will be informed in a timely way, and the visits rearranged for the following day and flagged as a priority.

    Ask what steps the organisation has in place to record when visits are missed and whether, when visits are missed, they are then prioritised the next day, or whether they are expected to be fitted around the existing jobs for that day (which might explain long delays), and what safeguards are in place to ensure that consecutive visits are not missed, resulting in extended periods with no vists / assistance.

    Ask for a refund of fees to reflect the fact that the full service paid for was not provide and ask for a copy of their formal complaints process.

    If you already have a copy of their complaints process, or can find one, follow it, and reference it in the letter (e.g. I look forward to receiving a substantive response within 28 days in accordance with your complaints policy)
    • dazza-mac
    • By dazza-mac 21st Oct 16, 3:29 PM
    • 260 Posts
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    dazza-mac
    I don't completely understand the relationships here. Does your dad pay for his care and accommodation or towards it? If he does, who does he pay? That's the person you should be addressing the complaint to because that's the person who your dad has a contractual relationship with. If he doesn't pay for his care, then I think you should be taking this up with social services rather than either Anchor or Age Uk.

    In addition to all this though, it may be worth making a complaint to the CQC about the lack of care provided. Have a look at their website here http://www.cqc.org.uk

    Finally, you could write to the local councillor covering the area or the local MP and ask if they can ask some difficult questions
    Originally posted by Nicki


    It's quite confusing as it's hard to get anyone to verify things. Basically it's Age UK who turn up to do the care, but every month we get a bill from social services so I suspect dad pays towards his care.


    I rang social services who said they would get someone to ring me back to let me know if I need to inform them that I put in a complaint against Age UK. they haven't got back yet.


    The head of care from Age UK rang me the other day to acknowledge the complaint and will be 'investigating'.


    I will be contacting social services again to chase them up as to whether I'm complaining about the right people - but as I say, it's Age UK who physically do the work.
    • dazza-mac
    • By dazza-mac 21st Oct 16, 3:31 PM
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    dazza-mac
    Where does your Dad have his showers - in his own flat? Has he got a properly adapted bathroom with wheelchair access and a seat in the shower? What about hand-rails?

    We had our bathroom completely re-done earlier this year and there is a possibility that my DH may end up with above-knee amputation.

    I've just had revision of total hip replacement and I think I'd die if I couldn't have my daily shower via level access shower cubicle. Bliss!
    Originally posted by margaretclare
    Yes he has them in his own flat
    • dazza-mac
    • By dazza-mac 21st Oct 16, 3:35 PM
    • 260 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    dazza-mac
    If Dad's care is self-funded (he pays for it himself or you on his behalf) then you need to speak to the manager of the care provider who you are paying to provide a service.

    If the care is funded, or part funded, by Social Services then you need to get onto the local SS and speak to a care manager to file a complaint against the agency for not adhering to the care plan.

    It will be really helpful if you have a copy of his care plan and the dates when the plan is not being followed. The reasons why don't really matter - the care plan is what is deemed as the basic level of care to meet Dad's needs and needs to be adhered to.
    Originally posted by Saffagal


    yes this seems to be the most accurate description. As we get a bill from social services each month his care is part funded and it's Age UK who do the work and presumably social services top up Age UK's bill. I'm going to phone social services again this afternoon and see what's going on as they didn't get back to me.
    • dazza-mac
    • By dazza-mac 21st Oct 16, 3:36 PM
    • 260 Posts
    • 47 Thanks
    dazza-mac
    Just an additional point, how many staff does Dad need when he is showering? If it is a single carer then it is inexcusable. If it is a double care visit, then (and I may be speaking completely out of turn as don't know how Dad transfers) has he had a recent assessment by an Occupational Therapist to ensure that he has the necessary equipment that he needs which may enable his showers to be safely managed by a sole carer.
    Originally posted by Saffagal
    one carer helps
    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 21st Oct 16, 5:21 PM
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    margaretclare
    If it is an Extracare flat, I think all of them have wetrooms with level access showers, shower seating and handrails. The village where my daughter works was custom built and all flats and bungalows are built to the same standard.
    Originally posted by kingfisherblue
    In that case, why is Dad limited to 3 showers a week, and doesn't even get those? Who decided that 3 a week was plenty, and not one daily? Was Dad's opinion taken into account?

    If only one carer is needed to 'help', and presumably just for safety, this is a very minimal requirement. Poor Dad!

    If that was me, heads would roll if I didn't get my daily shower.
    r ic wisdom funde, r wear ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 21st Oct 16, 7:37 PM
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    kingfisherblue
    In that case, why is Dad limited to 3 showers a week, and doesn't even get those? Who decided that 3 a week was plenty, and not one daily? Was Dad's opinion taken into account?

    If only one carer is needed to 'help', and presumably just for safety, this is a very minimal requirement. Poor Dad!

    If that was me, heads would roll if I didn't get my daily shower.
    Originally posted by margaretclare
    Extracare don't assess their residents - Social Services do. Extracare villages provide staff, but have to follow the care plan, the same as any other carer. If the care plan allows for only one careworker, then that is what will be provided, as this is all that is paid for.

    In exceptional circumstances, the careworkers stay with their resident and call the team leaders to rearrange the calls that follow - so for example, if a resident has fallen, the careworker will stay until the ambulance arrives. During that time, they have to make sure that the resident is safe, warm and reassured that help is coming. They also have to contact the team leader (who then has to sort out the calls that the careworker should be going on to), and possibly contact family (although the team leader sometimes does this).

    If it is an Extracare village (and you haven't confirmed this yet), then the staff should shower your dad ont he days set out in his care plan. If they don't, speak to the Head of Care or the village manager. Staff have to complete paperwork to say what they have done in each flat. You can read the paperwork. In addition, if your dad has not had a scheduled visit, or has had a visit on a day that he was not due one, it will be recorded because Extracare fobs show entry to flats on the system.

    Is your dad in an Extracare village/flats?
    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 22nd Oct 16, 10:54 AM
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    margaretclare
    But who made that care plan and who decided that 3 showers a week was adequate? Some people - especially men - sweat more and need more than 3 showers a week. They get smelly, which is not nice for them or for anyone who comes into contact with them.

    Not even getting the 3 showers laid down in the 'care plan' is even worse.
    r ic wisdom funde, r wear ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
    • Ames
    • By Ames 22nd Oct 16, 1:00 PM
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    Ames
    Three showers a week is pretty good, I think the standard is two here, or it used to be.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.


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    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 22nd Oct 16, 4:23 PM
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    kingfisherblue
    But who made that care plan and who decided that 3 showers a week was adequate? Some people - especially men - sweat more and need more than 3 showers a week. They get smelly, which is not nice for them or for anyone who comes into contact with them.

    Not even getting the 3 showers laid down in the 'care plan' is even worse.
    Originally posted by margaretclare
    I agree that three showers a week is inadequate, and when he doesn't receive those it isn't acceptable. Care plans are usually the responsibility of a social worker - but I bet they have more than three showers a week.

    I know that where my daughter works, her shift is booked up from going in to going home. She has a set amount of time to spend in each flat/bungalow, and set tasks to do. She also has to fill in the paperwork, and if something extra needs doing, she has to either fit it in or report it to her team leader. She is fortunate in that everybody lives on the same site (she used to work in the community, which could mean going to different towns). however, there is little capapcity for additional work. If a care plan changes, and someone is added onto a rota or time spent with a resident is extended, it has to be fitted in. Thta's how she started work there originally - she was an agency worker employed to cover the additional work. She was lucky enough to secure permanant emplyment with the village at a later date.
    • margaretclare
    • By margaretclare 22nd Oct 16, 6:28 PM
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    margaretclare
    Three showers a week is pretty good, I think the standard is two here, or it used to be.
    Originally posted by Ames
    Two 'here'? Where is 'here'?

    Again I ask - who decides? Is the person most concerned asked for his/her opinion?
    r ic wisdom funde, r wear ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
    • Person_one
    • By Person_one 22nd Oct 16, 7:18 PM
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    Person_one
    Two 'here'? Where is 'here'?

    Again I ask - who decides? Is the person most concerned asked for his/her opinion?
    Originally posted by margaretclare
    Whoever is paying, usually.
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