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    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 15th Oct 16, 9:42 AM
    • 1,963Posts
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    JustAnotherSaver
    House insurance: Unsure how to answer
    • #1
    • 15th Oct 16, 9:42 AM
    House insurance: Unsure how to answer 15th Oct 16 at 9:42 AM


    "Good state of repair" - should be no signs of damp.

    For anyone who's been on any of my threads you'll know we had quite a bit of work carried out due to damp. The whole living room was replaced & tanked, sump pump put in place.

    Which has dealt with the damp - so there's no visible signs as you walk in. It's contained & should it do its job as advertised it'll be like that for some time (fingers crossed).

    BUT the work has been carried out so obviously we had a damp issue.

    So how would you answer the question?

Page 1
    • dacouch
    • By dacouch 15th Oct 16, 2:04 PM
    • 19,730 Posts
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    dacouch
    • #2
    • 15th Oct 16, 2:04 PM
    • #2
    • 15th Oct 16, 2:04 PM
    The question asks if there is any evidence of damp.

    Providing their is no evidence of damp then you can answet that there is no evidence of damp
    • JustAnotherSaver
    • By JustAnotherSaver 15th Oct 16, 3:43 PM
    • 1,963 Posts
    • 289 Thanks
    JustAnotherSaver
    • #3
    • 15th Oct 16, 3:43 PM
    • #3
    • 15th Oct 16, 3:43 PM
    Thanks.

    I wasn't sure if it meant walking into a room & seeing any evidence on the walls etc or whether you know of there being a damp issue like what we had.

    • dacouch
    • By dacouch 15th Oct 16, 3:54 PM
    • 19,730 Posts
    • 12,094 Thanks
    dacouch
    • #4
    • 15th Oct 16, 3:54 PM
    • #4
    • 15th Oct 16, 3:54 PM
    You had an issue, it was dealt with and now (Presumably) there are no signs of damp.

    For obvoius reasons, Insurers want to avoid providing cover for the type of properties owned by people who do not actually maintain their properties.
    • Clifford_Pope
    • By Clifford_Pope 15th Oct 16, 5:37 PM
    • 2,952 Posts
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    Clifford_Pope
    • #5
    • 15th Oct 16, 5:37 PM
    • #5
    • 15th Oct 16, 5:37 PM
    The question asks if there is any evidence of damp.
    Originally posted by dacouch

    Why don't they just ask "Is there any damp?" which is what they mean?
    There might be no evidence of damp because it has been hidden, eg by inappropriate treatment which will cause trouble later.

    If they asked "Is there any evidence of flooding?" they presumably don't mean is it flooded now - and they might regard an old newsreel clip showing the town under water as very real evidence of flooding.

    If they want straightforward answers they should ask straightforward questions.
    • dacouch
    • By dacouch 15th Oct 16, 6:19 PM
    • 19,730 Posts
    • 12,094 Thanks
    dacouch
    • #6
    • 15th Oct 16, 6:19 PM
    • #6
    • 15th Oct 16, 6:19 PM
    Why don't they just ask "Is there any damp?" which is what they mean?
    There might be no evidence of damp because it has been hidden, eg by inappropriate treatment which will cause trouble later.

    If they asked "Is there any evidence of flooding?" they presumably don't mean is it flooded now - and they might regard an old newsreel clip showing the town under water as very real evidence of flooding.

    If they want straightforward answers they should ask straightforward questions.
    Originally posted by Clifford_Pope
    Because if they ask "Is there any damp" it would make it make it difficult to answer and possibly unfair.

    Is there any evidence of damp? The homeowner can then answer the question if there are signs of damp. There may well be damp but with no evidence.

    It could be seen as being unfair to penalise a (Possibly ignorant about DIY) at a later eg a claim because the home had damp but there were no signs a normal consumer could have spotted.

    The is there any damp question could potentially mean a consumer has a claim declined when the Insurer finds that the home does have damp problems when there were no signs a normal home owner would reasonably spot.

    By asking if there is any evidence of damp, it's fairer on the consumer and is likely to be an acceptable question should the matter ever be referred to the Ombudsman.
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