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  • FIRST POST
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 14th Oct 16, 5:24 PM
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    esuhl
    Being prescribed an overdose (again)
    • #1
    • 14th Oct 16, 5:24 PM
    Being prescribed an overdose (again) 14th Oct 16 at 5:24 PM
    I was just wondering how "normal" it is for doctors to prescribe overdoses of drugs?

    Last year I was prescribed a month-long course of steroids along with antibiotics to treat an infection. The drug information leaflet, however, said several times in bold print that the drugs should never be used for more than 10 days.

    I queried this with my GP, who said that it was perfectly safe to ignore any warnings given by drug manufacturers as they're just trying to cover themselves against legal action. Baffled by my hesitancy, he said that it wasn't really necessary to take the steroids at all if I didn't want to, and he'd only prescribed them to speed up my recovery by a day or two.

    It seems odd to prescribe an overdose when it isn't even necessary... :-/

    Anyway, I've just been prescribed a month's course of nasal-drops. Again, I've read the leaflet, which says three times in bold print that the drops should never be used for more than seven days.

    There is absolutely no qualification (e.g. "unless directed by your doctor").

    These drugs are for minor ailments. It's not as if I'm in a bad way and don't care about the risks.

    Is this normal?! It seems incredibly dangerous for patients to be told to ignore the official dosage limits.
    Last edited by esuhl; 14-10-2016 at 5:29 PM.
Page 2
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 15th Oct 16, 12:29 PM
    • 4,483 Posts
    • 5,641 Thanks
    theoretica
    Have you spoken to a pharmacist about your concerns? They are the experts on drugs.
    Originally posted by Bogalot

    This!

    What I am wondering is about pack size - if the drug company really wanted nasal drops to be taken for only a week they would surely put them in tiny bottles with only about a week's supply.
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 15th Oct 16, 1:10 PM
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    • 4,770 Thanks
    esuhl
    This!

    What I am wondering is about pack size - if the drug company really wanted nasal drops to be taken for only a week they would surely put them in tiny bottles with only about a week's supply.
    Originally posted by theoretica
    I'll check with a chemist -- definitely a good idea.

    I was given a couple of bottles of the nasal drops, so... possibly the manufacturer's really don't intend anyone to take them for more than seven days.

    I can understand why you do not trust the NHS, going by what you say about your parents, but millions of people are actually saved by it every year. It might just help, even at this late stage, and if you can bear it, discussing the events surrounding your parents with the appropriate doctor, so that you can get some factual answers, and it may help you put to rest your fears or maybe not.
    Originally posted by Riverbird
    I already have the facts. The NHS decided against a scan as their MRI machine was broken. They considered transporting my father to another nearby hospital for a scan, decided not to bother, and then took a guess at a diagnosis. He was treated for a condition he did not have. The condition that he did have meant that the treatment he was given was fatal. I wanted to pursue legal action (mostly to ensure that changes were made to prevent anyone else dying this way), but my mother was too distraught and insisted against it.

    My mother had (what I now know to be) very obvious signs of bowel cancer, yet she was treated for a stomach ulcer for well over a year, when the medication made no difference. Having been unable to eat for three weeks and collapsing, she was told to take laxatives and heartburn medicine. I admitted her to hospital about four times in the next fortnight. Each time she was given a saline drip and discharged, with no attempt to find out why she was unable to eat.

    Having been discharged from hospital and collapsing within the hour, I tried to call for an ambulance. The 999 operator's phone was faulty so he couldn't hear me. I tried hanging up and redialling, but the operator had kept the line open blocking my ability to redial, so I had to hunt for a mobile as my mother lay on the bathroom floor. There was a click on the first phone and suddenly the operator could hear me. I asked for an ambulance, but was told that I was wasting their time and would be put through to the police. The police answered and I said that it was an emergency and I'd asked for an ambulance. The police shouted at the operator, who muttered under his breath and connected me to the ambulance centre.

    The ambulance took nearly two hours to arrive as the sat-nav stopped working, so the driver sat in a layby 500 metres from our house just waiting for the GPS to receive a signal. Unbelievable.

    After over a month of not eating, she was so weak that when they eventually realised she had stage-III cancer, they could not treat her as she was too weak. So she died.

    I haven't even begun to list all the incompetencies we faced, but needless to say, if my parents had any kind of adequate care, they would very likely be alive today.

    The one thing I will say about the NHS, is that the actual medical procedures (when they have properly diagnosed you) are excellent. Triage, GP services and nursing are absolutely disgraceful. I don't really blame the staff too much -- it's the lack of time and money. And now the f***ing Tories are trying to kill the NHS (and half the population).

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/oct/14/no-extra-money-for-nhs-theresa-may-tells-health-chief

    Sorry if this turned into a bit of a rant. Every area of NHS care provided to my parents (except surgical procedures) was an absolute farce. Losing my parents was devastating. Knowing that I could have fought harder, shouted louder, and battled more aggressively to get suitable treatment plays on my mind. You really need someone determined to fight your corner if you want to survive NHS treatment.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 15th Oct 16, 1:20 PM
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    esuhl
    Not to continue my rant, but I was also furious with the oncologist who openly lied to us about my mother's condition. By then, it had been confirmed that the cancer had spread to her ovaries and lungs. But the oncologist repeatedly contradicted this and suggested my mother and I were "confused".

    I had to insist that the two contradicting doctors meet face-to-face with us and argue amongst themselves as to my mother's condition. Eventually the oncologist agreed that she had misled us as she didn't want us to "worry unnecessarily".

    Just to be clear, at this point, it was agreed by all staff that her condition was terminal. So what f***ing difference does it make?! Why would an oncologist so cruelly and deliberately lie to us?! Argh!
    • ERICS MUM
    • By ERICS MUM 15th Oct 16, 1:59 PM
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    ERICS MUM
    I was prescribed a dose of something for months which was 50% over the max dose in the leaflet. When I challenged my GP he said he'd written to the drugs company seeking advice on the risks of doing so, but that it was his belief that it would be beneficial. They confirmed It was ok, subject to the GP checking extra-carefully for any contra-indications.
    • DomRavioli
    • By DomRavioli 15th Oct 16, 6:47 PM
    • 2,853 Posts
    • 4,760 Thanks
    DomRavioli
    It just seems strange that the leaflet explicitly contradicts the doctor's advice. Most drug info leaflets say something like, "Do not exceed the stated dose unless advised by your doctor". Doctors are experts in health conditions. Pharmacists are experts in medicines. Please, speak to your pharmacist.



    Don't steroids cause problems with the immune system? Is it possible that the LD50 of steroids might be huge, but the complications that can occur indirectly due to overdose might be significant...? Not in a normally healthy individual. You seem to be clutching at straws.

    I really don't know much about medicine, so maybe I'm worrying about nothing. But it makes it hard to know who to trust when the people making the drugs are giving different advice to doctors. There should be some kind of campaign to stop people being given contradictory messages over something so important.
    Originally posted by esuhl
    There won't be a campaign; the information leaflet is for INFORMATION, and only that - you need to differentiate that the general information leaflet is general information for all patients, and specific medical advice about your specific personal medical history and situation are two completely different things.
    Observe, Adapt, Overcome.
    SPC 2015 #497
    • DomRavioli
    • By DomRavioli 15th Oct 16, 6:50 PM
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    DomRavioli
    I'll check with a chemist -- definitely a good idea.

    I was given a couple of bottles of the nasal drops, so... possibly the manufacturer's really don't intend anyone to take them for more than seven days.



    I already have the facts. The NHS decided against a scan as their MRI machine was broken. They considered transporting my father to another nearby hospital for a scan, decided not to bother, and then took a guess at a diagnosis. He was treated for a condition he did not have. The condition that he did have meant that the treatment he was given was fatal. I wanted to pursue legal action (mostly to ensure that changes were made to prevent anyone else dying this way), but my mother was too distraught and insisted against it.

    My mother had (what I now know to be) very obvious signs of bowel cancer, yet she was treated for a stomach ulcer for well over a year, when the medication made no difference. Having been unable to eat for three weeks and collapsing, she was told to take laxatives and heartburn medicine. I admitted her to hospital about four times in the next fortnight. Each time she was given a saline drip and discharged, with no attempt to find out why she was unable to eat.

    Having been discharged from hospital and collapsing within the hour, I tried to call for an ambulance. The 999 operator's phone was faulty so he couldn't hear me. I tried hanging up and redialling, but the operator had kept the line open blocking my ability to redial, so I had to hunt for a mobile as my mother lay on the bathroom floor. There was a click on the first phone and suddenly the operator could hear me. I asked for an ambulance, but was told that I was wasting their time and would be put through to the police. The police answered and I said that it was an emergency and I'd asked for an ambulance. The police shouted at the operator, who muttered under his breath and connected me to the ambulance centre.

    The ambulance took nearly two hours to arrive as the sat-nav stopped working, so the driver sat in a layby 500 metres from our house just waiting for the GPS to receive a signal. Unbelievable.

    After over a month of not eating, she was so weak that when they eventually realised she had stage-III cancer, they could not treat her as she was too weak. So she died.

    I haven't even begun to list all the incompetencies we faced, but needless to say, if my parents had any kind of adequate care, they would very likely be alive today.

    The one thing I will say about the NHS, is that the actual medical procedures (when they have properly diagnosed you) are excellent. Triage, GP services and nursing are absolutely disgraceful. I don't really blame the staff too much -- it's the lack of time and money. And now the f***ing Tories are trying to kill the NHS (and half the population).

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/oct/14/no-extra-money-for-nhs-theresa-may-tells-health-chief

    Sorry if this turned into a bit of a rant. Every area of NHS care provided to my parents (except surgical procedures) was an absolute farce. Losing my parents was devastating. Knowing that I could have fought harder, shouted louder, and battled more aggressively to get suitable treatment plays on my mind. You really need someone determined to fight your corner if you want to survive NHS treatment.
    Originally posted by esuhl
    I think you need to speak to someone about this - for your own sanity. Perhaps a work with a therapist would enable you to continue on with your life in a positive way.

    And if you're unhappy with the treatment your parents received, a complaint should be lodged - if that has been done and you are still unhappy, start legal proceedings.
    Observe, Adapt, Overcome.
    SPC 2015 #497
    • DomRavioli
    • By DomRavioli 15th Oct 16, 6:53 PM
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    DomRavioli
    Sure. At a lower dosage, the steroids I was prescribed could be taken for longer.



    You don't think that taking more than the safe dose as advised by the manufacturer constitutes an overdose? What does "overdose" mean, if not that?
    Originally posted by esuhl
    Just a heads up - an overdose is a large amount of the drug over a short period of time, and both of those criteria would need to be filled (and in your cases they were not). Related to the LD50.

    Maybe google Neuroticism?
    Observe, Adapt, Overcome.
    SPC 2015 #497
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 16th Oct 16, 12:46 AM
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    • 4,770 Thanks
    esuhl
    Maybe google Neuroticism?
    Originally posted by DomRavioli
    Maybe google "passive aggressive disorder"?
    • DomRavioli
    • By DomRavioli 16th Oct 16, 1:10 AM
    • 2,853 Posts
    • 4,760 Thanks
    DomRavioli
    Maybe google "passive aggressive disorder"?
    Originally posted by esuhl
    You're literally the person who thinks 4 weeks of nasal drops is an overdose. You're a healthcare professional's nightmare, and its people like you who waste NHS money on minor ailments with a GP appointment.

    And you still need to sort out that little issue of you being absolutely ridiculous over your parents deaths. Either do something about it, or do something about you. Whinging won't help.
    Observe, Adapt, Overcome.
    SPC 2015 #497
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 16th Oct 16, 1:27 AM
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    esuhl
    You're literally the person who thinks 4 weeks of nasal drops is an overdose. You're a healthcare professional's nightmare, and its people like you who waste NHS money on minor ailments with a GP appointment.

    And you still need to sort out that little issue of you being absolutely ridiculous over your parents deaths. Either do something about it, or do something about you. Whinging won't help.
    Originally posted by DomRavioli
    Oh dear... you're losing focus. I take you have nothing constructive to add to the thread?
    • mel48rose
    • By mel48rose 16th Oct 16, 8:28 AM
    • 511 Posts
    • 467 Thanks
    mel48rose
    Drama queen springs to mind
    If you change nothing, nothing will change!!
    • warby68
    • By warby68 16th Oct 16, 8:58 AM
    • 606 Posts
    • 7,941 Thanks
    warby68
    Oh dear... you're losing focus. I take you have nothing constructive to add to the thread?
    Originally posted by esuhl
    This is meant kindly OP, back away from the thread and decide what to do about what's really tormenting you.

    You lost parents in a dreadful way with many doubts about whether they could have been saved or had easier passage and need to come to terms with that. I have had similar although in my case I mainly doubt my own decisions along the way. Adopting a keyboard warrior style won't help on a forum like this, some people forget its real life people with real life troubles posting.

    There is no great agreement about the prescribing issue you raised so perhaps let it go before the thread upsets you even more on the other stuff.

    Wishing you well
    • barbiedoll
    • By barbiedoll 16th Oct 16, 10:43 AM
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    • 12,368 Thanks
    barbiedoll
    Going back to the original thread question: Yes, GP's do sometimes prescribe incorrect doses, that's why pharmacists check the prescriptions. They will often call a GP to determine whether or not the dose is correct. And of course, GP's do make mistakes, I have seen a script for paracetamol for a very young child, the dosage written was for an adult.

    Steroids aren't going to cure any infections, they are given to reduce inflammation.

    Eye/ear/nose drops usually have a shelf-life of 7 days after opening. That may be why the leaflet says they shouldn't be used after 7 days?
    "I may be many things but not being indiscreet isn't one of them"
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 16th Oct 16, 11:34 AM
    • 14,314 Posts
    • 36,442 Thanks
    FBaby
    Well, I know enough from experience that you're a fool to think you can trust the medical profession to get it right every time.
    This is true, but on the balance of probability, you are much safer trusting your doctor/pharmacist than yourself so you are still better doing as your doctor says. You are of course welcome to ask questions.

    When my allergies became unmanageable, my GP suggested long term nasal steroids spray. I was horrified as I had read about the risks of long term steroids, but he then explains that nasal spray don't pass the blood barrier and intensive research has shown to be safe. He gave me online links to look into and indeed, I was totally reassured. My life has been so much better since I started taking them.
    • jack_pott
    • By jack_pott 16th Oct 16, 12:21 PM
    • 3,311 Posts
    • 4,087 Thanks
    jack_pott
    I think you need to speak to someone about this - for your own sanity. Perhaps a work with a therapist would enable you to continue on with your life in a positive way.
    Originally posted by DomRavioli
    That's just what the NHS does isn't it, smear anyone who criticises them.

    And if you're unhappy with the treatment your parents received, a complaint should be lodged - if that has been done and you are still unhappy, start legal proceedings.
    Are you taking the p!ss or what? 99% of complaints against the NHS are rejected, 98% of those without any investigation. Here are a few comments from the Patient's Association report on the NHS complaint system:

    "not fit for purpose"
    "Complaints distressing, difficult and frequently produce little result,"
    "dishonest replies"
    "poorly handled"


    And here's a quote from the MPs who set up the Health Ombudsman:

    “The Bill was always drafted to be a swiz, and now it is spelt into the Bill…………Anyone who contemplates an office of this kind is faced with the dilemma of making it either a Frankenstein or a nonentity—a Frankenstein if it has effective powers and a nonentity if it has not. The Government, quite rightly, has opted for its being a nonentity, and in that sense it is a fraud……… I congratulate the Government on its being a nonentity. A Frankenstein would, I think, have undermined the power of Ministers......”

    Hansard, 24th January 1967

    A fraudulent complaint system, because an honest one would have undermined the power of Ministers. Scotland Yard are currently investigating the PHSO on 30 counts of Misconduct in Public Office for failing to investigate complaints properly.

    Maybe google Neuroticism?
    Originally posted by DomRavioli
    Were Stephen Lawrence's parents neurotic, or the Hillsborough families? When they were smeared by the Police it was a national scandal, but when the NHS systematically smear their critics they get lauded at the Olympics.
    • jack_pott
    • By jack_pott 16th Oct 16, 1:23 PM
    • 3,311 Posts
    • 4,087 Thanks
    jack_pott
    Not to continue my rant, but I was also furious with the oncologist who openly lied to us about my mother's condition. By then, it had been confirmed that the cancer had spread to her ovaries and lungs. But the oncologist repeatedly contradicted this and suggested my mother and I were "confused".

    I had to insist that the two contradicting doctors meet face-to-face with us and argue amongst themselves as to my mother's condition. Eventually the oncologist agreed that she had misled us as she didn't want us to "worry unnecessarily".

    Just to be clear, at this point, it was agreed by all staff that her condition was terminal. So what f***ing difference does it make?! Why would an oncologist so cruelly and deliberately lie to us?! Argh!
    Originally posted by esuhl
    In August 2012 I was taken to A&E by ambulance and diagnosed with heart arrhythmia. I had been complaining that something was wrong but was told to ignore my symptoms and get more exercise. I quickly discovered that chronic endurance training increases the risk of developing arrhythmia. Soon afterwards my GP wrote to cardiology, but I’ve not been allowed to see the letter.

    When I saw cardiology in October they denied that they had ever seen any arrhythmia, and wrote as much to my GP. That letter went unchallenged.

    In Feb 2013 I saw another cardiologist, and he also denied that they had seen any arrhythmia, and then denied that I had ever been taken to A&E at all before discharging me. My GP also ignored his letter even though she had the letter from A&E confirming my diagnosis (I know because it was me who delivered it by hand).

    A few days later I gave cardiology a copy of an ECG that the paramedics gave me, and a copy of the letter from A&E. They were ignored.

    There are ten pages of ECGs in my records, some of them marked with the diagnosis and signed by the consultant in resus.

    By April 2013 I was back on an ambulance again, and after hearing this story the consultant in A&E decided to transfer me onto the observation ward. When my heart kicked off again the following morning a nurse rushed in, printed an ECG, and took it to find a doctor, but ten minutes later the day shift came on duty and denied that I had arrhythmia, blaming my heart rate on a faulty bedside monitor. That ECG is present in my records, and the notes show that they knew I had arrhythmia at the time they were denying it. Later in the morning a doctor confirmed I had arrhythmia and put me on meds, but an hour later another doctor was denying it again, and telling me that they had never seen any evidence of anything wrong. My discharge letter shows that they knew of the August admission that they were denying, but my consultant was still denying that they had seen any arrhythmia prior to April when he referred me for a heart operation in July.

    On subsequent visits to hospital, cardiology were placing new copies of the denial letters in my records even after they knew them to be wrong.

    In June 2014 I was told I had no arrhythmia and sent home from A&E even though I was taking regular medication for it and on the waiting list for a heart operation at the time.

    When I complained I was told that the reason cardiology denied my arrhythmia is that the records were in A&E, and that I’m just confused if I expected that they would have gone downstairs to fetch them. At the time the cardiologist told me that I had never been taken to A&E he showed me a blank screen on the computer as ‘proof’, but what he knew and I didn’t is that A&E have a separate computer system to cardiology. The doctor on the observation ward told me that they had already checked in A&E at the time he was denying my arrhythmia.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 16th Oct 16, 1:33 PM
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    • 4,770 Thanks
    esuhl
    Eye/ear/nose drops usually have a shelf-life of 7 days after opening. That may be why the leaflet says they shouldn't be used after 7 days?
    Originally posted by barbiedoll
    I was given two bottles, so that's 14-days each... :-/

    This is true, but on the balance of probability, you are much safer trusting your doctor/pharmacist than yourself so you are still better doing as your doctor says. You are of course welcome to ask questions.
    Originally posted by FBaby
    I had no intention of trusting myself and completely ignoring professional opinion. This is why I'm not happy about ignoring the professional medical advice provided by the drugs manufacturer. I imagine it's much more likely for a doctor to make a one-off mistake than for thousands of incorrect information leaflets to be distributed with no one noticing the error.

    Rather than take it entirely upon myself to decide how long to take the drops, I want the experts to advise me. Unfortunately they seem to disagree. Hence my dilemma.

    When my allergies became unmanageable, my GP suggested long term nasal steroids spray. I was horrified as I had read about the risks of long term steroids, but he then explains that nasal spray don't pass the blood barrier and intensive research has shown to be safe. He gave me online links to look into and indeed, I was totally reassured. My life has been so much better since I started taking them.
    Originally posted by FBaby
    I'm glad you got the information you wanted and were able to make the decision to use the spray. I think the NHS could save a lot of time and reduce the number of errors made if patients were given more information about the drugs they are taking.

    Routinely telling patients to ignore drug dosage information is going to lead to someone dying, if it hasn't already. Someone is wrong, and I just think that it's really dangerous to tell people to ignore professional advice. Of course you HAVE TO ignore professional advice if two professionals contradict each other.

    As much as I value doctors' opinions (even if I have learnt from experience to never place absolute trust in them), it's my body and it's up to me to decide whether to accept any drugs or medical procedures that are offered.

    Anyway, judging from some of the comments on this thread, it's fairly normal for patients to be given contradicting information, so I'll just have to go back to the chemist/GP/hospital and get them to explain why the contradiction exists. And then I can decide whether or not to ignore the advice printed on the leaflet or to ignore my doctor's original prescription.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 16th Oct 16, 6:39 PM
    • 6,801 Posts
    • 4,770 Thanks
    esuhl
    Oh my goodness -- I've just seen your post, jack_pott. That must've been awful.

    I really wonder why the administration of the NHS is such a shambles. The staff must know how bad it is, so I can't begin to imagine why they knowingly rely on dubious information. It seems to be such a common theme.

    --------------------

    I can't remember if I mentioned it, but I'm allergic to penicillin. One day I was prescribed antibiotics, and only when I got the drugs home did I find out that's what I'd been given.

    It was a Friday night, so I knew I wouldn't get another appointment over the weekend. Fortunately the infection started to get better so I didn't go back.

    A year or so later I needed antibiotics again, and my GP swore blind that I must be mistaken about my allergy. He even laughed that my last prescription was for penecilin. When I told him that I didn't actually take the drug, he "assured" me that I certainly would have done (what?!).

    He argued over it for several minutes, until I simply said that I wasn't going to leave unless he corrected my medical records.

    -------------------

    Another time, I requested a repeat prescription of two drugs. I came to collect them, but there had been some confusion and there was only a prescription for one drug. No big deal, I'll come back in a few days.

    I return, only to be told that they don't have any record of me having the drug on repeat prescription, so I'll need to make an appointment with the doctor. I asked them to double-check, as I'd have to take even more time off work to visit the surgery, but alas no joy.

    I arrive for the appointment, and ask for the repeat prescription to be added to my notes. The doctor replied that the prescription is already waiting for me at reception, and that I'm wasting NHS time and money by making an appointment that I didn't even need! He called the receptionist in, who also rebuked me for wasting their time. I was f***ing furious! I'd left work early on THREE occasions due to their sheer incompetence.

    -------------------

    And it's not just the NHS that get it wrong. My local chemist put a drugs label on the wrong packs of drugs. So my mother (who was partially-sighted) was taking an overdose of fluoxetine (four times the maximum dose), instead of the drug that she should have been taking.

    It was only by chance that I saw the pack and, since I recognised fluoxetine as an antidepressant, I asked if she was feeling okay. After some confusion, I looked at the drug label and saw a totally different drug name.

    You've got to be so careful when people's health and lives are at stake. I suppose it's only when you witness these things for yourself that you see how badly things can go wrong, and how you have to keep your wits about you and question everything.
    • DomRavioli
    • By DomRavioli 16th Oct 16, 9:51 PM
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    DomRavioli
    Oh dear... you're losing focus. I take you have nothing constructive to add to the thread?
    Originally posted by esuhl
    Plenty, you just don't want to hear it. You've been told what to do and still you continue on with your misguided rants. I wouldn't be surprised if there were patient markers on your file.
    Observe, Adapt, Overcome.
    SPC 2015 #497
    • jack_pott
    • By jack_pott 17th Oct 16, 1:15 AM
    • 3,311 Posts
    • 4,087 Thanks
    jack_pott
    He argued over it for several minutes, until I simply said that I wasn't going to leave unless he corrected my medical records.
    Originally posted by esuhl
    You like living dangerously don't you! (TextremovedbyMsEForumTeam)was taken away in handcuffs by the police for insisting that the errors in her medical records be corrected. According to the PA you have no right to have the errors corrected.

    In August 2014 I saw a note in my records saying that I had already had my heart operation even though I was still on the waiting list for it. I pointed out the error numerous times during the week I was in hospital but it just went in one ear and out of the other, each time a doctor walked in it was: "I see you've already had your operation". I challenged them about it in my complaint, but they just denied it even though I already had a copy of the document with the error on. My records now say that my heart operation has failed, even though it hasn't.

    Another time, I requested a repeat prescription of two drugs. I came to collect them, but there had been some confusion and there was only a prescription for one drug. No big deal, I'll come back in a few days.

    I return, only to be told that they don't have any record of me having the drug on repeat prescription, so I'll need to make an appointment with the doctor. I asked them to double-check, as I'd have to take even more time off work to visit the surgery, but alas no joy.

    I arrive for the appointment, and ask for the repeat prescription to be added to my notes. The doctor replied that the prescription is already waiting for me at reception, and that I'm wasting NHS time and money by making an appointment that I didn't even need! He called the receptionist in, who also rebuked me for wasting their time. I'd left work early on THREE occasions due to their sheer incompetence.
    I've had numerous prescription errors, it's an uphill struggle getting them put right. On one occasion I had the right drug at the wrong dose, then after I pointed out the error, the wrong drug at the right dose, then after I showed them the drug packets it went back to the right drug at the wrong dose again.

    And yes, they always spin their own mistakes to make it look like your fault. My records have numerous DNAs in them even though I rang to notify that I was cancelling the appointments.

    There was an occasion when the crash team came in to get my heart under control, and they disconnected the bedside monitor so that they could use a portable ECG on a trolley. When the leads are disconnected, the monitor bleeps gently and displays an annunciator on the screen: "Leads Disconnected".

    About an hour later a nurse walked in and said "why is it bleeping", so I pointed out that I was connected to the other monitor on the trolley. It didn't register, and she just stood there pressing every button on the screen muttering "why is it bleeping". After a few minutes of this whilst I repeatedly told her that it wasn't connected she triumphantly announced "Ah! I know why it's bleeping, the leads are not connected." It doesn't give you much confidence if the staff don't know how to use the tools they're provided with.
    Last edited by MSE ForumTeam3; 17-10-2016 at 2:07 PM. Reason: Personal details
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