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  • FIRST POST
    • AdventureRocks
    • By AdventureRocks 14th Oct 16, 1:37 PM
    • 115Posts
    • 10Thanks
    AdventureRocks
    First Car Buying Private How to Test Drive no insurance?
    • #1
    • 14th Oct 16, 1:37 PM
    First Car Buying Private How to Test Drive no insurance? 14th Oct 16 at 1:37 PM
    Hello,

    So i am going to test drive a car being sold private tomorrow.

    This is my first car so i currently have no insurance so am not insured to drive any other vehicles for a fact .

    The person selling said i would be covered on their insurance, although i am really not convinced.

    If i buy the annual insurance for the car now , can i just cancel it if the car turns out to be a dud ? Or is there a better way?
Page 2
    • Aretnap
    • By Aretnap 15th Oct 16, 11:52 AM
    • 2,428 Posts
    • 1,901 Thanks
    Aretnap
    Under the continuous Insurance Enforcement rules, the car must be related to an insurance policy IF it's driven on a public road and the responsibility lies with the RK. However providing the OP takes out temporary cover to drive the car and that the cover specifically covers the car, then that would satisfy the OP's responsibility as far as the the RTA is concerned even if the RK has no insurance cover in place.
    Originally posted by Tilt
    It would satisfy the RK's responsibility as well. The continuous enforcement law simply requires that the car be covered by a policy that specifically identifies it. There's no requirement that the policy is taken out by or in the name of the RK - it just has to exist in some form. If the OP takes out a policy on the car then the RK is also fine from the point of view of continuous insurance (on the days the OP's policy is in force, at least).

    In any event the OP says that the seller does have insurance of his own, so the question isn't especially relevant.

    AdventureRocks - it is theoretically possible that the seller does have a policy which allows any driver to drive his car, but it is unlikely - any driver policies are expensive and you have to go out of your way to find them. If he has a standard car insurance policy then it will NOT cover you to drive, unless he specifically asks his insurer to add you as a named driver for the day (and in most cases pays them an extra fee). Certainly you should not rely on his insurance unless you've seen the documents and checked for yourself that it covers you.

    Failing that your options are as suggested a one day policy of your own, or take someone you trust who does have driving other cars cover who can test drive it for you.
    • Tilt
    • By Tilt 15th Oct 16, 12:39 PM
    • 3,369 Posts
    • 1,579 Thanks
    Tilt
    The OP would be OK provided he could produce the cover note within 7 days. The police might seize the car in the meantime, but that's not the OP's problem.
    Originally posted by Car 54
    True. But the OP would be far better off carrying the cover note with him/her while driving the car. Then there should be no issue in the first place.
    PLEASE NOTE
    My advice should be used as guidance only. You should always obtain face to face professional advice before taking any action.
    • Tilt
    • By Tilt 15th Oct 16, 12:48 PM
    • 3,369 Posts
    • 1,579 Thanks
    Tilt
    It would satisfy the RK's responsibility as well. The continuous enforcement law simply requires that the car be covered by a policy that specifically identifies it. There's no requirement that the policy is taken out by or in the name of the RK - it just has to exist in some form. If the OP takes out a policy on the car then the RK is also fine from the point of view of continuous insurance (on the days the OP's policy is in force, at least).
    Originally posted by Aretnap
    Absolutely, I think I said that in post #2.

    In any event the OP says that the seller does have insurance of his own, so the question isn't especially relevant.
    Originally posted by Aretnap
    It probably would be relevant if the seller was 'mistaken'.

    AdventureRocks - it is theoretically possible that the seller does have a policy which allows any driver to drive his car, but it is unlikely - any driver policies are expensive and you have to go out of your way to find them. If he has a standard car insurance policy then it will NOT cover you to drive, unless he specifically asks his insurer to add you as a named driver for the day (and in most cases pays them an extra fee). Certainly you should not rely on his insurance unless you've seen the documents and checked for yourself that it covers you.
    Originally posted by Aretnap
    Which is why I mention the seller could be 'mistaken' and ultimately it's the driver's responsibility to ensure he/she has adequate insurance cover while on the road.
    PLEASE NOTE
    My advice should be used as guidance only. You should always obtain face to face professional advice before taking any action.
    • Threewheeler
    • By Threewheeler 15th Oct 16, 12:59 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 14 Thanks
    Threewheeler
    If the seller does not have insurance, does he have RFT or is the vehicle SORN?
    Threewheeler
    • Nodding Donkey
    • By Nodding Donkey 15th Oct 16, 2:19 PM
    • 2,248 Posts
    • 1,833 Thanks
    Nodding Donkey
    If the seller does not have insurance,
    Originally posted by Threewheeler
    You haven't read the thread have you?
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