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  • FIRST POST
    • Any
    • By Any 14th Oct 16, 10:22 AM
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    Any
    Repetetively failing silicon around shower base
    • #1
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:22 AM
    Repetetively failing silicon around shower base 14th Oct 16 at 10:22 AM
    Hi,


    I am not sure anyone actually has any solution or ideas how to deal with the problem we are having.. But here is a try.


    Basically, we had rather large bathroom failure, where the silicon around our shower corner base (our only shower, no other shower or bath) failed and it had leaked probably for some time.
    We took the ceiling down and discovered damage to joists too. This explains why the gap in between the top of the tiles and the base was getting bigger, now it stands at about maybe 4-5mm.


    We are having builders in in 6 months to rip it all out, and redesign the whole space (new joists, floors, walls - the works), but we need to last until then!!


    It seems that despite putting loads of silicon in, the seal is still not water tight and there is an escape of water. We have redone this number of times. I think the gap is now too big and so the silicone keeps failing. I can feel from below that the floor is still slightly damp (as we still have no ceiling).


    Is there any product, doesn't matter what it looks like, that I can paint over the silicon and tiles to create more of a waterproofing, or something I can place over the gap with silicon? Some sort of tape, glue, anything.


    The only other option I see is for someone to come in, take the shower out, bottom layer of tiles and redo the whole thing. Obviously this will be expensive if I could even find someone to do job like that (we always struggle get people in for smaller jobs. Unless it is to replace the whole bathroom). Given that it will be ripped out in 6 months time, I just want to see first whether there is anything we can try to just tie us over for the 6 months to save the expense (and the fact we will be shower less for period of time!!).
Page 1
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 14th Oct 16, 10:28 AM
    • 1,942 Posts
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    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #2
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:28 AM
    • #2
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:28 AM
    There is no real fix for this besides having the shower fitted properly and not using it until it's fixed.
    • Any
    • By Any 14th Oct 16, 11:05 AM
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    Any
    • #3
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:05 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:05 AM
    I was afraid of that... how long would that take do you think? (before you can use it again)
    Also, we are concerned that taking the base out might make it unusable... it is a big heavy stone one and we think that manipulating it out will damage it..
    have people just taken it out and reused it before?
    • sysadmin
    • By sysadmin 14th Oct 16, 11:09 AM
    • 114 Posts
    • 55 Thanks
    sysadmin
    • #4
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:09 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:09 AM
    remove the tiles and use shower paneling - this is what we had done when we had a similar issue

    Something like this http://www.showerwall.co.uk/

    Not what we used but similar i think. Was about £70 per 2 meter wide panel
    • Any
    • By Any 14th Oct 16, 11:18 AM
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    Any
    • #5
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:18 AM
    • #5
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:18 AM
    remove the tiles and use shower paneling - this is what we had done when we had a similar issue

    Something like this http://www.showerwall.co.uk/

    Not what we used but similar i think. Was about £70 per 2 meter wide panel
    Originally posted by sysadmin

    Is it easy to use?
    Did you hire a professional for the job or did it yourself?
    • phill99
    • By phill99 14th Oct 16, 1:05 PM
    • 7,606 Posts
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    phill99
    • #6
    • 14th Oct 16, 1:05 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Oct 16, 1:05 PM
    Is it easy to use?
    Did you hire a professional for the job or did it yourself?
    Originally posted by Any
    This is your problem. You are trying to do it on the cheap.


    Get a professional mastic applicator in and they may well be able to resolve the problem. It may also be grout failure which will require more intensive work to sort out.
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 14th Oct 16, 1:20 PM
    • 3,056 Posts
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    Hoploz
    • #7
    • 14th Oct 16, 1:20 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Oct 16, 1:20 PM
    By the sounds of it you ought to be more concerned with whether the floor is about to fall down into the room below
    • Any
    • By Any 14th Oct 16, 1:26 PM
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    Any
    • #8
    • 14th Oct 16, 1:26 PM
    • #8
    • 14th Oct 16, 1:26 PM
    We had the joiners in and they said the floor is not going anywhere.
    It is a little patch where this is occurring, sitting on a wall too.


    Obviously if this is going to be kept damp for the next 6 months, then we might have bigger problems.


    Yes, we are trying to do it on the cheap, because I would like to avoid spending hundreds of pound on something that will only be there for 6 months you see. That whole part of the house will be gutted out completely.


    If I will have no other option, I will have to pay it.
    Last edited by Any; 14-10-2016 at 1:34 PM.
    • sysadmin
    • By sysadmin 14th Oct 16, 2:36 PM
    • 114 Posts
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    sysadmin
    • #9
    • 14th Oct 16, 2:36 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Oct 16, 2:36 PM
    We had the floor re-done and the shower panelling fitted and it cost about £1200 all in
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 14th Oct 16, 2:49 PM
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    shaun from Africa
    One mistake that a lot of people make when filling large gaps with silicone is to simply fill the gap in one go.
    This generally doesn't work as the silicon needs moisture from the air to cure and with thick beads it takes a very long time for it to totally cure and until this time it can move and the break the seal between the shower tray and the floor.

    It's much better to build up the silicon over the course of a few days by putting a small bead down well under the tray and gradually adding more beads on top of this.
    • phil24_7
    • By phil24_7 14th Oct 16, 2:52 PM
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    phil24_7
    You could hire some acros and jack the floor back up, cut some thick plywood into strips as wide as the joist and nail and glue them to the sides of the sagging joists. Remove the acros, allow the floor to settle for a day or two then reseal. A few hundred quid and a days work.
    Last edited by phil24_7; 14-10-2016 at 3:08 PM.
    • Any
    • By Any 14th Oct 16, 3:11 PM
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    Any
    Hi,


    Thank you Sysadmin. I think we would need a professional to come in and give us a quote.


    I am actually looking at putting this www.kinedo.co.uk into the new bathroom.. I always had problems with bathrooms and this seems to me as a good bet. Also this is an old house with uneven floors and walls, which is not making any tradesman's job easier..
    Anyone could recommend this or any other make?


    We did it in 2 goes Shaun, but you might be right, it is still not enough time lapsed.
    • Any
    • By Any 14th Oct 16, 3:21 PM
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    • 7,852 Thanks
    Any
    You could hire some acros and jack the floor back up, cut some thick plywood into strips as wide as the joist and nail and glue them to the sides of the sagging joists. Remove the acros, allow the floor to settle for a day or two then reseal. A few hundred quid and a days work.
    Originally posted by phil24_7

    That sounds like a quite job and definitely not something we could do ourselves.
    Jacking floor up could also cause tiles on the floor to crack etc.
    Would have thought it would be safer to do it from above - remove the base and work from there..
    • WestonDave
    • By WestonDave 14th Oct 16, 3:34 PM
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    WestonDave
    Just a thought - is the floor actually dry at any point before you try testing it. If you've got a inch thick floor board soaked with water, its not going to dry out very quickly - you might dry the surface but its going to take a bit of time for the all the water to come out. You need to be sure water is coming through again as opposed to old water still coming out.


    In terms of possible solutions I don't know if its still around but you used to be able to get a stick on L shaped strip that was designed for covering the join between the wall and a bath. Depending on the gap it might help. https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bath-Sealing-Strip-3-35m-SupaDec/dp/B00Y3PIHA8 is what I was thinking of - but you need to be sure there is enough of it gripping on both sides so it depends how big a gap you are trying to bridge. I'd still fill the gap down the side/back of the tray with silicon but the idea behind this strip is that it diverts most of the water away and into the tray so there is less to even try to find its way down the gap. Its not a long term solution or going to be that attractive and may need replacing periodically if it starts to lift but I guess it could buy you a bit of time until your refurb.
    Adventure before Dementia!
    • phil24_7
    • By phil24_7 14th Oct 16, 3:40 PM
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    phil24_7
    If jacked up slowly (maybe over the space of a few days) it will cause no more problems than the dropping over a period of time has/will.

    If all of the joist are already exposed below then it isn't beyond the realms of DIY, depending on your skill level.
    • WestonDave
    • By WestonDave 14th Oct 16, 3:45 PM
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    WestonDave
    Another thought is that the boating industry must have some form of waterproof "tape" that will stick to things that are going to get wet - as a short term solution maybe something like that would help if you have a chandlery store anywhere nearby - or can find something online. As I said above if you can get most of the water which is currently running down the wall and then down the gap to divert into the tray you may cut it down to little enough to dry out organically between showers.
    Adventure before Dementia!
    • andyhop
    • By andyhop 14th Oct 16, 7:38 PM
    • 1,749 Posts
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    andyhop
    Silicone won't stick to silicone . If the gap is too deep use foam strips to fill them silicone

    If you have a gap at the bottom of the tile to tray then your floor has sunk or the tray hasn't been correctly fitted

    Tray should be sat on a bed of tile adhesive or atleast a bag of mortar. Floor under the tray should be sound and solid, ideally replaced with 18/22/25mm plywood

    Sticking laminate boards over the top is a bodge, it still won't fix the movement
    Last edited by andyhop; 14-10-2016 at 7:41 PM.
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    • Chanes
    • By Chanes 14th Oct 16, 9:51 PM
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    Chanes
    Expanding foam? Maybe?
    • Bettie
    • By Bettie 14th Oct 16, 11:19 PM
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    Bettie
    could you not put a shower curtain or two on a wire and velcro/stick it to the sides at the bottom or with weights on it would hang straight so the water runs down the curtain into the tray?
    • Any
    • By Any 15th Oct 16, 8:31 AM
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    Any
    Another thought is that the boating industry must have some form of waterproof "tape" that will stick to things that are going to get wet - as a short term solution maybe something like that would help if you have a chandlery store anywhere nearby - or can find something online. As I said above if you can get most of the water which is currently running down the wall and then down the gap to divert into the tray you may cut it down to little enough to dry out organically between showers.
    Originally posted by WestonDave
    Something like that I was hoping for, but cannot find anything online!
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