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  • FIRST POST
    • Markashia
    • By Markashia 14th Oct 16, 9:41 AM
    • 5Posts
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    Markashia
    Solid Conservatory Roof No Building Regs
    • #1
    • 14th Oct 16, 9:41 AM
    Solid Conservatory Roof No Building Regs 14th Oct 16 at 9:41 AM
    Resolved, thank you for all your replies! Much appreciated.
    Last edited by Markashia; 14-10-2016 at 10:34 PM.
Page 1
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 14th Oct 16, 10:14 AM
    • 3,878 Posts
    • 3,450 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #2
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:14 AM
    • #2
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:14 AM
    20 years is about the limit where people (ought to) stop caring about a lack of paperwork. If the foundations were rubbish, why would they wait 20 years before starting to sink?
    • Markashia
    • By Markashia 14th Oct 16, 10:17 AM
    • 5 Posts
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    Markashia
    • #3
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:17 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:17 AM
    Thanks for the response! If it was as it was built i wouldn't - i'm just worried about any additional load added by the roof within the last 10. We've had no paperwork on it so i have no idea.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 14th Oct 16, 10:34 AM
    • 3,878 Posts
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    davidmcn
    • #4
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:34 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:34 AM
    Ah, missed the point about the new roof. But I don't think that in itself needs building regulations. Really more a point for you to satisfy yourself via your surveyor(s) that it's structurally sound. What has your surveyor said about it?
    • Markashia
    • By Markashia 14th Oct 16, 10:37 AM
    • 5 Posts
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    Markashia
    • #5
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:37 AM
    • #5
    • 14th Oct 16, 10:37 AM
    The surveyor just said that it may need building regs but didn't notice any immediate problems.
    Last edited by Markashia; 14-10-2016 at 10:34 PM.
    • Pete9501
    • By Pete9501 14th Oct 16, 11:04 AM
    • 414 Posts
    • 389 Thanks
    Pete9501
    • #6
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:04 AM
    • #6
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:04 AM
    Having looked at this because I am considering a solid roof (although plastic slates), have fitted internal french doors and have a radiator in the conservatory, it does need building regs. I have no intention of going through that palaver.

    Sounds like your vendor has made an big effort to make the room far more usable throughout the year by keeping it cooler in the summer with a solid roof and heating for the winter plus new windows.

    Suggest you go for the indemnity.
    • Markashia
    • By Markashia 14th Oct 16, 11:08 AM
    • 5 Posts
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    Markashia
    • #7
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:08 AM
    • #7
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:08 AM
    Thanks Pete - Do you mind me asking why you don't want to get the building regs? Is it that much of a palaver if its done at the time?
    Last edited by Markashia; 14-10-2016 at 10:35 PM.
    • Pete9501
    • By Pete9501 14th Oct 16, 11:24 AM
    • 414 Posts
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    Pete9501
    • #8
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:24 AM
    • #8
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:24 AM
    Bit of a guess, but the original conservatory in this house of yours didn't need building regs at the time it was fitted because they don't if any heating in the conservatory isn't connected to the house CH or at least have a valve to isolate it. That the majority of the conservatory is glass or plastic etc and there is something about internal doors to the rest of the house needing to be external door quality.

    We have radiators in the conservatory down on frost setting but can't turn them off from the main house central heating. The french doors between the house and conservatory are very nice mat varnished teak but only internal quality so don't comply. However, they look perfect and fit really well for something that I bought off e bay second hand. Finally we will change the roof to reflect heat during the summer because plastic roofs are dreadfully hot even with a roof window open and I am not convinced glass is much better. The cost of changing all this to comply with building regs is more than I am willing to pay and for what? who benefits? so I will take the risk that the council are not interested in our 1991 conservatory. In 25 years when we move into a sheltered flat our buyers can worry about it, because we won't be.
    Last edited by Pete9501; 14-10-2016 at 11:29 AM.
    • Markashia
    • By Markashia 14th Oct 16, 11:34 AM
    • 5 Posts
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    Markashia
    • #9
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:34 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:34 AM
    That seems fair enough to be honest. Obviously the regulations depend on area but we called our building regs office and they said that they would just need to ensure that the roof contained enough insulation and that the foundations are deep enough to hold the roof. Then the radiator and internal doors would be signed off.

    I understand that building regs are only really required when selling but I dont want to face the same problems when selling, seeing as I can obviously give fewer assurances as I wasn't the owner when the changes were made.
    Last edited by Markashia; 14-10-2016 at 10:35 PM.
    • Pete9501
    • By Pete9501 14th Oct 16, 11:46 AM
    • 414 Posts
    • 389 Thanks
    Pete9501
    You can try asking the vendor for any paper work for the roof, but builders could be anything from a one man band to a large company who did the design first and then followed this through without alteration. You are unlikely to be able to tell the difference even if the builder is still in business from a receipt. By chance our extension which our conservatory is built on to has drawn plans which I hold a copy of but this is rare because paperwork gets lost. Just wish they had done the same for the conservatory.

    If you have time or are willing to wait you could take a gamble and ask the vendor to sort out building regs. However, they could equally say no. Do you play poker well? its that sort of game and depends on who blinks first, or worse a third party comes in and says we will buy it.

    Do not give the council the address as that will stop any chance of an indemnity policy being taken out. You are on a sticky wicket just talking to them about it.

    Pete
    Last edited by Pete9501; 14-10-2016 at 11:50 AM.
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 14th Oct 16, 12:20 PM
    • 4,862 Posts
    • 6,373 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    I'd also suggest you ask specifcally when each of the pieces of work were done 'some time in the last 10 years' is very vague.

    If it was a year ago then there might still be compliance issues. If it was 9 years ago then not only is that unlikely to be a issue, but it is alos much more likely that any potential problems would already have developed.

    The sellers must know when they did the work.
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 14th Oct 16, 12:26 PM
    • 955 Posts
    • 1,142 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    If you are not happy with this extension on the house why are you still interested in buying the house? This is not going to be the only house on the market so if you look around you may find one that doesn't have this problem?
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 14th Oct 16, 2:51 PM
    • 8,466 Posts
    • 6,099 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    Indemnity insurance will not compensate you for failure of the conservatory (or any part thereof). If you have contacted the council and they know the address of the property, you cannot take out indemnity insurance
    • eddddy
    • By eddddy 14th Oct 16, 5:35 PM
    • 3,850 Posts
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    eddddy
    But as this doesn't protect us if the conservatory starts sinking because it lacks the correct foundations i'm not sure if this is even an option?
    Originally posted by Markashia
    The only real ways to reassure yourself that the conservatory is not going to sink are:

    - A surveyor (or somebody else knowledgeable) looks for signs of movement. e.g. cracks, deflections, lines which aren't horizontal/vertical, evidence of crack repairs.

    - A structural engineer has holes dug around the conservatory to inspect the foundations and tests the soil.

    - A structural engineer checks the original plans for the conservatory - and 'hopes' that the builder stuck to the plans.

    - A surveyor/structural engineer can make an 'educated guess', by assuming it has 'typical' conservatory foundations, and assessing the additional weight of the new roof.


    Although I suspect an excessively heavy roof would be more likely to push the conservatory walls outwards, than cause it to sink.

    So I think it's more likely that the walls would fall over rather than sink - if that's any consolation!
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