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  • FIRST POST
    • millymollie
    • By millymollie 13th Oct 16, 5:11 PM
    • 87Posts
    • 13Thanks
    millymollie
    Homebuyers report help needed please
    • #1
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:11 PM
    Homebuyers report help needed please 13th Oct 16 at 5:11 PM
    Hi,
    Currently buying a 1920s semi, love the house but just had the RICS homebuyers report back.
    Few 3s which we expected ie electric, gas etc.
    The surveyor has valued it at the purchase price, however what has scared us is this comment regarding the structure..

    The front bay has signs of movement with evidence representing it has dropped on the left hand side. This appears significantly noticeable and I believe it requires further investigation to identify if it is progressive. I recommend you instruct a structural engineer to investigate further. Condition Rating 3.

    There is also a comment re the upstairs that the floors are sloping from right to left, although they are just within acceptable limits. This was rated 2.

    Does anyone have any advice? Also if it does need fixing will it be expensive as the house will pretty much wipe us out. The report doesn't mention subsidence so why would it drop?? I'm pretty clueless so any help would be great!!!!

    Many thanks in advance x
Page 1
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 13th Oct 16, 5:19 PM
    • 3,054 Posts
    • 2,704 Thanks
    Hoploz
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:19 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:19 PM
    Sounds like you should be asking the structural engineer his thoughts. If work is required, ie he determines it is progressive and not historic, then you may be able to renegotiate the buying price to go some way towards paying for it.
    • millymollie
    • By millymollie 13th Oct 16, 5:50 PM
    • 87 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    millymollie
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:50 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:50 PM
    Thanks.
    So do you think it would warrant getting a structural engineer out?
    Sorry to sound dense but if its historic does that mean it's not likely to get worse? And if it's progressive then it may worsen? Would there be any other cause than subsidence?
    Having a nightmare atm!!!!!!

    Thanks again
    • Chanes
    • By Chanes 13th Oct 16, 6:06 PM
    • 604 Posts
    • 345 Thanks
    Chanes
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 6:06 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 6:06 PM
    Thanks.
    So do you think it would warrant getting a structural engineer out?
    Sorry to sound dense but if its historic does that mean it's not likely to get worse? And if it's progressive then it may worsen? Would there be any other cause than subsidence?
    Having a nightmare atm!!!!!!

    Thanks again
    Originally posted by millymollie
    The surveyor has recommended the engineer because it may get worse and he doesn't have the knowledge to ascertain if it will or won't. It would be worth the cost methinks.
    • stator
    • By stator 13th Oct 16, 6:12 PM
    • 5,050 Posts
    • 3,211 Thanks
    stator
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 16, 6:12 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 16, 6:12 PM
    IF the house is worth the effort then yes get a structural engineer, but bear in mind they might not be able to give you definitive answers either.
    Ask the vendor if they have any evidence of the progression of the cracks, eg old photos that can show the size of them at specific dates. Or any previous surveys they had done that show evidence of it's condition.
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 13th Oct 16, 6:35 PM
    • 3,054 Posts
    • 2,704 Thanks
    Hoploz
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 16, 6:35 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 16, 6:35 PM
    Thanks.
    So do you think it would warrant getting a structural engineer out?
    Sorry to sound dense but if its historic does that mean it's not likely to get worse? And if it's progressive then it may worsen? Would there be any other cause than subsidence?
    Having a nightmare atm!!!!!!

    Thanks again
    Originally posted by millymollie
    Yes, historic means it happened a while ago and is probably stable (for example, some houses suffered from bomb damage disturbance in ww2)

    Progressive means it is current and could well be ongoing
    • georgehere
    • By georgehere 14th Oct 16, 1:34 AM
    • 55 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    georgehere
    • #7
    • 14th Oct 16, 1:34 AM
    • #7
    • 14th Oct 16, 1:34 AM
    mm

    Buying a house can be both exciting and stressful - especially once you find one you want!

    In reality, none of us online can give you the reassurance you need on this issue from a distance ...

    Ask the mortgage company is they are still going to lend you all the money and take some comfort if they say yes. Take some comfort from the valuation. Then get a second opinion - a local builder would be a good option, or an independent surveyor.

    Hope all goes well.
    • ultimatedingbat
    • By ultimatedingbat 14th Oct 16, 6:42 AM
    • 737 Posts
    • 202 Thanks
    ultimatedingbat
    • #8
    • 14th Oct 16, 6:42 AM
    • #8
    • 14th Oct 16, 6:42 AM
    My next door neighbours bay window started to drop but it wasnt susidence. IT was due to the weight of the bay window. It needed to be resupported.
    • Tewdric
    • By Tewdric 14th Oct 16, 11:29 AM
    • 7 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Tewdric
    • #9
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:29 AM
    • #9
    • 14th Oct 16, 11:29 AM
    Hi,
    Currently buying a 1920s semi, love the house but just had the RICS homebuyers report back.
    Few 3s which we expected ie electric, gas etc.
    The surveyor has valued it at the purchase price, however what has scared us is this comment regarding the structure..

    The front bay has signs of movement with evidence representing it has dropped on the left hand side. This appears significantly noticeable and I believe it requires further investigation to identify if it is progressive. I recommend you instruct a structural engineer to investigate further. Condition Rating 3.

    There is also a comment re the upstairs that the floors are sloping from right to left, although they are just within acceptable limits. This was rated 2.

    Does anyone have any advice? Also if it does need fixing will it be expensive as the house will pretty much wipe us out. The report doesn't mention subsidence so why would it drop?? I'm pretty clueless so any help would be great!!!!

    Many thanks in advance x
    Originally posted by millymollie
    We had something similar come back on the mortgage report bit for a 1920s semi we really liked. Our mortgage survey report refused to value the house until we'd had a full survey.

    We had a full survey - it was the best money we spent. They found problems with both the front and back bays and recommended that at least £10,000 was dropped from the house asking price and that further survey drilling investigation and repair work was carried out.

    The vendors and estate agents denied there was any issue with the house and that the cracks were 'historical' and posed no threat.

    We sent them, for the second time, the highlighted bits in our survey and asked them if they were prepared to carry out the work/drop the asking price of the house. We waited a week, heard nothing back and eventually managed to get hold of the estate agent who said the vendor's response to the survey and our requests was..... "well, what do you want us to do about it?"

    We pulled out of the purchase. Shame, as the house had appeared to be everything we wanted in a location we really wanted at that time.

    My advice would be have the survey and then decide if you want to/are able to deal with whatever it throws up.
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