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  • FIRST POST
    • Sweet3434
    • By Sweet3434 13th Oct 16, 4:49 PM
    • 4Posts
    • 1Thanks
    Sweet3434
    Is landlord right?? Disrepair
    • #1
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:49 PM
    Is landlord right?? Disrepair 13th Oct 16 at 4:49 PM
    Hi ive had mould problems in my rented house for 11 months. Finally a damp proofer came and when i asked the landlord for a copy of the actual report they refused to send me it, only a summary which they wrote out to my email
    Rising damp in hallway
    All chimney breasts (in every room) have hygroslopic salts and the plaster needs coming off and plastering with waterproof plaster
    I have mould on walls too in these rooms (with book lice) and my furniture is all green on the backs or bottoms of drawers in bedrooms and he said apparently the 2 above issues are not causing this, this is down to poor ventilation/heating and low level wall insulation.
    The damp proofer told me when he came he could see it wasnt my fault but landlord is saying hes taking no responsibilty or liability for my furniture
    Who is right please. The house has a concrete floor and damp proofer said because its a old house there is no damp proof course. Im confused as to why mould would be in the bedrooms though unless it has come from the chimneys? My humidity is always 60% never lower even with a dehumidifier on and windows open. Whats happening lol
Page 1
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 13th Oct 16, 4:50 PM
    • 15,147 Posts
    • 14,752 Thanks
    Guest101
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:50 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:50 PM
    Hi ive had mould problems in my rented house for 11 months. Finally a damp proofer came and when i asked the landlord for a copy of the actual report they refused to send me it, only a summary which they wrote out to my email
    Rising damp in hallway
    All chimney breasts (in every room) have hygroslopic salts and the plaster needs coming off and plastering with waterproof plaster
    I have mould on walls too in these rooms (with book lice) and my furniture is all green on the backs or bottoms of drawers in bedrooms and he said apparently the 2 above issues are not causing this, this is down to poor ventilation/heating and low level wall insulation.
    The damp proofer told me when he came he could see it wasnt my fault but landlord is saying hes taking no responsibilty or liability for my furniture
    Who is right please. The house has a concrete floor and damp proofer said because its a old house there is no damp proof course. Im confused as to why mould would be in the bedrooms though unless it has come from the chimneys? My humidity is always 60% never lower even with a dehumidifier on and windows open. Whats happening lol
    Originally posted by Sweet3434


    If you want a report which explains this, pay for one.


    The LL doesn't have to share it with you.
    • theartfullodger
    • By theartfullodger 13th Oct 16, 5:19 PM
    • 8,894 Posts
    • 11,743 Thanks
    theartfullodger
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:19 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:19 PM
    It's an old,damp, cold, expensive to heat place: It always will be, even if the landlord improves it.

    Move.
    • fishpond
    • By fishpond 13th Oct 16, 5:25 PM
    • 927 Posts
    • 502 Thanks
    fishpond
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:25 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:25 PM
    "My humidity is always 60% never lower even with a dehumidifier on and windows open"
    I thought it was getting dry around here.
    I am a LandLord, so there!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Oct 16, 12:21 AM
    • 23,114 Posts
    • 88,454 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #5
    • 14th Oct 16, 12:21 AM
    • #5
    • 14th Oct 16, 12:21 AM
    Damp and humid air is common in older property, but it can be exacerbated by some people's lifestyles. We also can't know know whether alterations have been made which compromise the way the house 'breathes.' e.g. upvc double glazing, lack of coal fires etc. For those reasons, apportioning blame is impossible, and not much use anyway.

    As artful says, it's not likely that damp remediation alone will change the situation as much as you'd like. The answer is to move to a more modern property, where you'll pay less for heating and maybe never need a dehumidifier.
    'A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they'll never sit in.'
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