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  • FIRST POST
    • BettyBoof
    • By BettyBoof 13th Oct 16, 3:41 PM
    • 209Posts
    • 1,344Thanks
    BettyBoof
    Would you work away from home for double your salary?
    • #1
    • 13th Oct 16, 3:41 PM
    Would you work away from home for double your salary? 13th Oct 16 at 3:41 PM
    My DH has the opportunity of a job with interesting work, great benefits and double his current salary - the downside is that he'd be working away from home four to five days a week. There would be some occasions where he wasn't away and would be working from home instead, but it looks like the four to five days away is the norm (hence the salary). He wouldn't be working in one place so we don't have the option of relocating.

    Our first reaction was "no way" as we have young kids but having talked some more we are wondering if we see it as a short-term thing (one to two years max) in order to get us to a point of financial stability if it's something we could cope with. We are currently doing okay financially - but just okay - and still have some debts and almost no savings. Our pensions are a bit iffy too so although that's a while off yet, it is something we'd like to save for now.

    No decision has been made (and we are still leaning towards the no side) but I'd love to hear some opinions/experiences please to help us consider all the options.
    £1000 Emergency fund #120 = £650 (65%)
Page 1
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 13th Oct 16, 3:50 PM
    • 2,640 Posts
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    TELLIT01
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 3:50 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 3:50 PM
    Would he be able to find another job fairly easily if being away so much didn't work out for you? If so, I think I'd probably be inclined to give it a go, even if he viewed it as a short term thing (1 year or so), to help sort your finances.
    Although he would be doubling his basic salary, does he have to take his accommodation, meals and any other costs out of that new figure. If so, it might not look so great once the sums are done.
    • Jackieboy
    • By Jackieboy 13th Oct 16, 4:09 PM
    • 251 Posts
    • 397 Thanks
    Jackieboy
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:09 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:09 PM
    If it's such a wonderful opportunity, wouldn't you think of relocating the whole family?
    • BettyBoof
    • By BettyBoof 13th Oct 16, 4:12 PM
    • 209 Posts
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    BettyBoof
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:12 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:12 PM
    His travel, accommodation and reasonable expenses would be covered by the company so we wouldn't be out of pocket for that.

    I think he would be able to find a short-term contract role relatively easily if it didn't work out, a permanent role would be harder. Most likely what would happen is that he'd contract for a bit and then go back to a permanent role on a salary similar to his current one. So we'd have to make sure we saved hard during the new job and didn't increase our expenditure too much so that dropping back would be easy - would hate for him to feel he was in 'golden handcuffs' and couldn't leave if he didn't like it.
    £1000 Emergency fund #120 = £650 (65%)
    • BettyBoof
    • By BettyBoof 13th Oct 16, 4:13 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 1,344 Thanks
    BettyBoof
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:13 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:13 PM
    If it's such a wonderful opportunity, wouldn't you think of relocating the whole family?
    Originally posted by Jackieboy
    As I mentioned he wouldn't be working in the same place (so maybe London Mon to Wed, Aberdeen Thurs and Fri one week and then Leeds all the next week) so relocation isn't an option.
    £1000 Emergency fund #120 = £650 (65%)
    • Jackieboy
    • By Jackieboy 13th Oct 16, 4:15 PM
    • 251 Posts
    • 397 Thanks
    Jackieboy
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:15 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:15 PM
    As I mentioned he wouldn't be working in the same place (so maybe London Mon to Wed, Aberdeen Thurs and Fri one week and then Leeds all the next week) so relocation isn't an option.
    Originally posted by BettyBoof
    I'm sorry, I missed that.
    • plasticcheese
    • By plasticcheese 13th Oct 16, 4:21 PM
    • 16 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    plasticcheese
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:21 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:21 PM
    My friend was offered a 9 month contract in Afghanistan, they have 2 small kids. He took and and now their mortgage is paid off, leaving them in a great place. Kids are resilient provided they have a stable home, my friend was only able to do it as his wife didn't work and had grandparents etc around.
    • DomRavioli
    • By DomRavioli 13th Oct 16, 4:22 PM
    • 2,853 Posts
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    DomRavioli
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:22 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:22 PM
    I'd snap their hand off. My ex did this, except he would be away for 6 months at a time (without coming home). Took a bit of getting used to, but it worked for us.

    You need to both be committed to making it work if you decide to do it. It is hard, but it is really worth it.
    Observe, Adapt, Overcome.
    SPC 2015 #497
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 13th Oct 16, 4:26 PM
    • 9,503 Posts
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    suki1964
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:26 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:26 PM
    My husband done it for 9 years

    We don't have young children though

    He worked 3 weeks away, 1 week home

    The money was fantastic but it nearly broke us as a couple


    If it's a short term thing, then go for it. Just don't start living to the money so it becomes hard to give it up DH was only supposed to have done it for a year. Ok so the recession came so he had to keep at it. But seriously we are happier now he's home all the time, even if we are broke
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 13th Oct 16, 4:38 PM
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    agrinnall
    Depends on the current salary and whether doubling it results in a significant salary. If it's £10K doubling to £20K probably not, but £30K doubling to £60K definitely worth considering (after taking into account higher rate tax and any impact on benefits such as tax credits).
    • BettyBoof
    • By BettyBoof 13th Oct 16, 4:43 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 1,344 Thanks
    BettyBoof
    I'm sorry, I missed that.
    Originally posted by Jackieboy
    That's okay - it was quite a long post!

    We don't have grandparents very close so it would fall to me to manage the home and kids and life's little dramas. I only work part-time so that helps. I do worry about this as I'd struggle if I got ill for example.

    We'd definitely only want to do it short-term and totally agree re not living off the new salary.
    £1000 Emergency fund #120 = £650 (65%)
    • BettyBoof
    • By BettyBoof 13th Oct 16, 4:44 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 1,344 Thanks
    BettyBoof
    Good point agrinnall, definitely worth it.
    £1000 Emergency fund #120 = £650 (65%)
    • MataNui
    • By MataNui 13th Oct 16, 5:15 PM
    • 684 Posts
    • 304 Thanks
    MataNui
    About 18 months ago i went the other way. From working away (contracting and staying in hotels all week) to working from home. Now earn about 50% (accounting for tax benefits of running a ltd company) of what i was earning. Still a very good salary by most measures.

    Sometimes though i do find it a bit difficult being around all the time. I kind of got used to a bit of peace during the week.
    • Jazee
    • By Jazee 13th Oct 16, 5:26 PM
    • 4,154 Posts
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    Jazee
    My DH worked away in different locations for 3 years, short term for us. It worked well so I'd say give it a go. It's also very easy to keep in touch these days with skype etc.
    The "Save 12k in 2017" Thread! Jan £0



    • GwylimT
    • By GwylimT 13th Oct 16, 5:30 PM
    • 5,437 Posts
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    GwylimT
    My wife works away, she always has done apart from six weeks after the birth of each child. She is home Friday-Monday morning, as I work part time around her days it means we don't need any childcare, which works very well.
    • BettyBoof
    • By BettyBoof 13th Oct 16, 5:37 PM
    • 209 Posts
    • 1,344 Thanks
    BettyBoof
    Thanks so much for sharing your experiences, it is really helpful. I though the responses would be a resounding 'no' but I can see that is working/has worked for lots of you.
    £1000 Emergency fund #120 = £650 (65%)
    • DD265
    • By DD265 13th Oct 16, 6:11 PM
    • 1,115 Posts
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    DD265
    If it helps, my Dad worked away 3-5 days a week whilst we were growing up and I don't remember missing him. Don't get me wrong we were always excited to have him home, but we had Mom.
    Barclaycard: £1795.61/£2907.26 - 38% paid
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    • Andrew Ryan 89
    • By Andrew Ryan 89 13th Oct 16, 6:30 PM
    • 412 Posts
    • 238 Thanks
    Andrew Ryan 89
    Well, double my salary if I was on £19k then no. Doubled my salary to put me on £100k then yes.

    £100k salary would mean I could make a significant dent in my mortgage, could probably buy a second home and/or my wife would not have to work.

    How much is your husband being offered?
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 13th Oct 16, 6:31 PM
    • 2,735 Posts
    • 4,277 Thanks
    sangie595
    We were spread across two continents for years - for reasons to complicated to go into, the best schools for the children were in the USA, whilst dad and I were here in the UK. They came here every holiday. They grew up totally well adjusted, independent, young people with a great attitude towards life and very responsible and kind adults. The amount of time they see you isn't the thing. But neither is the money you earn. The quality of parenting is the only thing that matters. If you can provide that as parents, a bit of time away won't harm the family or the kind of people they grow up to be.

    So I'm voting with the "go for it" brigade. And maybe some weekends, instead of dad coming back, you could go to him. Travel broadens their minds and their horizons, even if only in the UK.
    • xapprenticex
    • By xapprenticex 13th Oct 16, 6:53 PM
    • 692 Posts
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    xapprenticex
    Family comes first, needs come before wants, etc etc
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