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  • FIRST POST
    • SoupedNinja
    • By SoupedNinja 13th Oct 16, 2:18 PM
    • 4Posts
    • 0Thanks
    SoupedNinja
    Buying a house - Coal mines within 20M
    • #1
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:18 PM
    Buying a house - Coal mines within 20M 13th Oct 16 at 2:18 PM
    Hi All,

    I've been looking to buy for a short while - have viewed quite a few houses so far in the West Midlands area - and have found a couple that meet the criteria. I've also discovered that the area is rife with past coal mining activity.

    One property which meets all our requirements is unfortunately situated within 20M of several mine shafts. One is outside the boundary of the property, in the area of the footpath/road, 6M from the building. The others are 20M or more from the building. These were last worked in the early 1900's at a depth of 65m - 120m, and the house was built in the late 1930's or early 1940's. The report also said that there was in a surface area possibly affected by mining of ironstone from the 1850's at 150m depth.

    Looking round the house there was no cracking or distortion visible to any interior walls, doors all closed properly, no cracking or new brickwork etc on the outside of the building. No claims reported in the area by the Coal Authority.

    I've had opinions from others stretching from an immediate "don't even bother" to "it's not moved in 80 odd years and half this place is built on/near mines". The one nearest the house has a main road running right next to it... Research online shows the same swinging opinion.

    Obviously the offer price would have to reflect the work that the property needs doing internally, and also the (hopefully low) risk of any subsidence in the future. Is there any more advice/opinion that you guys can offer to me? Would a mine entry interpretive report bring anything more to light as there appear to be no records of any treatment at all?
    Last edited by SoupedNinja; 13-10-2016 at 2:21 PM.
Page 1
    • Stevie Palimo
    • By Stevie Palimo 13th Oct 16, 2:22 PM
    • 2,860 Posts
    • 4,086 Thanks
    Stevie Palimo
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:22 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:22 PM
    Think I would pass on it if it were me looking at these, Sinkholes and so on happening more often nowadays would make me be on edge in this house wondering if one morning I woke up 50 foot down.
    " I refuse to censor myself because it may offend someone. If you don't like me that's ok, I don't need your approval. "
    • ap1985
    • By ap1985 13th Oct 16, 2:25 PM
    • 260 Posts
    • 102 Thanks
    ap1985
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:25 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:25 PM
    Hi All,

    I've been looking to buy for a short while - have viewed quite a few houses so far in the West Midlands area - and have found a couple that meet the criteria. I've also discovered that the area is rife with past coal mining activity.

    One property which meets all our requirements is unfortunately situated within 20M of several mine shafts. One is outside the boundary of the property, in the area of the footpath/road, 6M from the building. The others are 20M or more from the building. These were last worked in the early 1900's at a depth of 65m - 120m, and the house was built in the late 1930's or early 1940's. The report also said that there was in a surface area possibly affected by mining of ironstone from the 1850's at 150m depth.

    Looking round the house there was no cracking or distortion visible to any interior walls, doors all closed properly, no cracking or new brickwork etc on the outside of the building. No claims reported in the area by the Coal Authority.

    I've had opinions from others stretching from an immediate "don't even bother" to "it's not moved in 80 odd years and half this place is built on/near mines". The one nearest the house has a main road running right next to it... Research online shows the same swinging opinion.

    Obviously the offer price would have to reflect the work that the property needs doing internally, and also the (hopefully low) risk of any subsidence in the future. Is there any more advice/opinion that you guys can offer to me? Would a mine entry interpretive report bring anything more to light as there appear to be no records of any treatment at all?
    Originally posted by SoupedNinja

    This sounds like Corby
    • ERICS MUM
    • By ERICS MUM 13th Oct 16, 2:32 PM
    • 3,161 Posts
    • 5,934 Thanks
    ERICS MUM
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:32 PM
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:32 PM
    Would you be able to get a mortgage on this property ? Would anyone insure you for subsidence ?

    Personally I wouldn't buy it because I'd be worried and forever looking for signs of subsidence !
    • lee111s
    • By lee111s 13th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    • 2,464 Posts
    • 1,750 Thanks
    lee111s
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/north-east-news/houses-west-allotment-cordoned-families-11567821
    • SoupedNinja
    • By SoupedNinja 13th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    SoupedNinja
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    It would be a cash purchase. The two insurers i've read the policy documents of don't specifically mention past mining/coal mining in the subsidence section (they exclude "settling" of new land), and a dummy quote done for the exact address did not at any point ask about mining, and the assumptions also make no mention of it. Unless i'm looking in the wrong place that is.

    As far as I understood it, if it was a coal mine/shaft that caused subsidence, the Coal Authority would pay for rectification.
    Last edited by SoupedNinja; 13-10-2016 at 2:40 PM.
    • SoupedNinja
    • By SoupedNinja 13th Oct 16, 4:51 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    SoupedNinja
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:51 PM
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 16, 4:51 PM
    chroniclelivenews/north-east-news/houses-west-allotment-cordoned-families-11567821
    Originally posted by lee111s
    Interestingly where the damage occurred, there are no mine entries on the mining data map. Which i've come to the realisation that anywhere I buy a house in this area there could be undisclosed mine shafts or other history - whereas if you know where they are, whats the likelyhood of there being other undisclosed shafts?
    • bubbs
    • By bubbs 13th Oct 16, 5:02 PM
    • 41,595 Posts
    • 504,692 Thanks
    bubbs
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:02 PM
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:02 PM
    This sounds like Corby
    Originally posted by ap1985
    Corby coal mines?
    Sealed pot challenge number 242 £350 for 2015, 2016 £400 Actual£345, £400 for 2017
    Stopped Smoking 22/01/15
    FOR ALL YOU MOANERS , LOOSE GRAPES, MUSHROOM DOES NOT COUNT ON APG DO NOT BUY AS FILLER
    Happy now?
    • SoupedNinja
    • By SoupedNinja 13th Oct 16, 5:04 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    SoupedNinja
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:04 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 16, 5:04 PM
    Corby coal mines?
    Originally posted by bubbs
    More black country way.
    • bubbs
    • By bubbs 13th Oct 16, 5:11 PM
    • 41,595 Posts
    • 504,692 Thanks
    bubbs
    Its not Corby , Corby was steelworks
    Sealed pot challenge number 242 £350 for 2015, 2016 £400 Actual£345, £400 for 2017
    Stopped Smoking 22/01/15
    FOR ALL YOU MOANERS , LOOSE GRAPES, MUSHROOM DOES NOT COUNT ON APG DO NOT BUY AS FILLER
    Happy now?
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