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  • FIRST POST
    • cogito
    • By cogito 13th Oct 16, 1:01 PM
    • 1,809Posts
    • 2,904Thanks
    cogito
    Bob Dylan
    • #1
    • 13th Oct 16, 1:01 PM
    Bob Dylan 13th Oct 16 at 1:01 PM
    Awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

    Fantastic!
Page 2
    • redux
    • By redux 13th Oct 16, 4:28 PM
    • 15,558 Posts
    • 18,362 Thanks
    redux
    Sundown, yellow moon
    I replay the past
    I know every scene by heart
    They all went by so fast
    • Tipsntreats
    • By Tipsntreats 13th Oct 16, 4:47 PM
    • 1,887 Posts
    • 3,264 Thanks
    Tipsntreats


    We do have his autograph from outside the Royal Bath hotel in Bournemouth.
    Money, money, money
    Must be funny
    • koexelek
    • By koexelek 13th Oct 16, 4:49 PM
    • 7,480 Posts
    • 15,758 Thanks
    koexelek
    When you ain't got nothing, you got nothing to lose

    One of my favourite lines from any song
    I am a Mortgage adviser
    You should note that this site doesn't check my status as a Mortgage Adviser, so you need to take my word for it. This signature is here as I follow MSE's Mortgage Adviser Code of Conduct. Any posts on here are for information and discussion purposes only and shouldn't be seen as financial advice.
    • codger
    • By codger 13th Oct 16, 5:22 PM
    • 1,348 Posts
    • 1,973 Thanks
    codger
    He wrote the soundscape of an entire generation.

    He used words in a way that poets use 'em to voice the inarticulate passions and desires and concerns and confusions of those who could barely explain such even to themselves.

    He was 'my' Dylan in much the same way that a slightly earlier generation to mine had 'their' Kerouac and 'their' Salinger. But he did better than both, teamed feelings to words and words to music such as to ignite the soul, not merely feed the brain.

    He wrote all there was ever to write and sang all there was ever to sing about Kent State, about Vietnam, about the Chicago Democratic convention, about Haight-Ashbury, about parents and politicos and growing up and growing free and sex and love and peace and war and he did it not as a documentarist but a balladeer with the unlikeliest voice and the unlikeliest melodies and if you didn't actually know what the hell he was on about then, you certainly grew to understand more as the years went by.

    He contributed to Literature in as unique and as lasting way as the other great writers of other eras with language as eloquent as it was so seemingly casual and meaning that found visceral resonance if not always instant understanding.

    He was, it's true, of his times and looking back now as I do from my ageing senior citizen's bath chair (or, well, almost) I can no more imagine those times without Dylan than I can conceive of them without Lennon, McCartney, Jagger, Richards, Davies, Hendrix, Parsons, Wilson, Joplin.

    I can't conceive of that because I can't conceive of going through adolescence into adulthood to the accompaniment of a boy band or TV talent show audience winner as plastic as the vinyl that used to spin in 'my' jukebox.

    Yet though of his times, Dylan was not, nor ever could be, for those times alone. I have grandkids who have Maggie's Farm hammering through their MP3 earphones the same way I have a particular individual playing his tambourine for me on a long day's drive into night. And I have fellow septuagenarians who know exactly -- exactly -- what it means to experience Tom Thumb's Blues because though the pain has eased with the passing of the years, the wistfulness still remains.

    I acknowledge that for those of us who were there, who were so ridiculously unexpectedly astonishingly undeservingly lucky to be alive and living those lives of ours in all their wildest, craziest and most beautiful fullness, how easy, how natural, it is for us to today applaud -- nah: to jump up and down and dance around, the way Mrs C has just been doing -- at news of the prize which Dylan has now been awarded.

    For others of a more recent generation though, it isn't going to be so easy. In some cases -- such as Conrad's, here on this thread -- misapprehensions of Robert Allen Zimmerman may well be so great as to result in verdicts which some might consider notable only for a shameful shallowness.

    But not those of my generation. For us, well . . .

    Don't think twice, it's all right.
    • Intoodeep
    • By Intoodeep 13th Oct 16, 5:25 PM
    • 669 Posts
    • 856 Thanks
    Intoodeep
    Alright, no need to be Tom Petty about it, still sounds like Dylan to me, and Gerry Rafferty was in the Travelling Willburys...the fact that none of the other members of TB knew about it is a different matter entirely.
    Originally posted by makingplans4nigel

    Ermmmm don't think he was




    Roy Orbison


    Jeff Lynne


    Tom Petty


    Bob Dylan


    George Harrison
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 13th Oct 16, 6:48 PM
    • 21,276 Posts
    • 81,828 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    You've still got him as your avatar though?

    So what books has he written and they any good?
    Originally posted by makingplans4nigel

    Nope. I've got a guitar playing rabbit as my avatar.

    Mainly because I couldn't find a small enough image of Cacophonix.

    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • colinw
    • By colinw 13th Oct 16, 6:53 PM
    • 46,405 Posts
    • 127,070 Thanks
    colinw
    He wrote the soundscape of an entire generation.

    He used words in a way that poets use 'em to voice the inarticulate passions and desires and concerns and confusions of those who could barely explain such even to themselves.

    He was 'my' Dylan in much the same way that a slightly earlier generation to mine had 'their' Kerouac and 'their' Salinger. But he did better than both, teamed feelings to words and words to music such as to ignite the soul, not merely feed the brain.

    He wrote all there was ever to write and sang all there was ever to sing about Kent State, about Vietnam, about the Chicago Democratic convention, about Haight-Ashbury, about parents and politicos and growing up and growing free and sex and love and peace and war and he did it not as a documentarist but a balladeer with the unlikeliest voice and the unlikeliest melodies and if you didn't actually know what the hell he was on about then, you certainly grew to understand more as the years went by.

    He contributed to Literature in as unique and as lasting way as the other great writers of other eras with language as eloquent as it was so seemingly casual and meaning that found visceral resonance if not always instant understanding.

    He was, it's true, of his times and looking back now as I do from my ageing senior citizen's bath chair (or, well, almost) I can no more imagine those times without Dylan than I can conceive of them without Lennon, McCartney, Jagger, Richards, Davies, Hendrix, Parsons, Wilson, Joplin.

    I can't conceive of that because I can't conceive of going through adolescence into adulthood to the accompaniment of a boy band or TV talent show audience winner as plastic as the vinyl that used to spin in 'my' jukebox.

    Yet though of his times, Dylan was not, nor ever could be, for those times alone. I have grandkids who have Maggie's Farm hammering through their MP3 earphones the same way I have a particular individual playing his tambourine for me on a long day's drive into night. And I have fellow septuagenarians who know exactly -- exactly -- what it means to experience Tom Thumb's Blues because though the pain has eased with the passing of the years, the wistfulness still remains.

    I acknowledge that for those of us who were there, who were so ridiculously unexpectedly astonishingly undeservingly lucky to be alive and living those lives of ours in all their wildest, craziest and most beautiful fullness, how easy, how natural, it is for us to today applaud -- nah: to jump up and down and dance around, the way Mrs C has just been doing -- at news of the prize which Dylan has now been awarded.

    For others of a more recent generation though, it isn't going to be so easy. In some cases -- such as Conrad's, here on this thread -- misapprehensions of Robert Allen Zimmerman may well be so great as to result in verdicts which some might consider notable only for a shameful shallowness.

    But not those of my generation. For us, well . . .

    Don't think twice, it's all right.
    Originally posted by codger
    You summed it all up very well there. At the same time the Beatles were writing pop songs about Wanting to hold your hand, a 22 year old Bob Dylan was writing A Hard rains a-gonna fall. He was the voice of his generation and transcends that to be part of the history itself.
    • colinw
    • By colinw 13th Oct 16, 6:54 PM
    • 46,405 Posts
    • 127,070 Thanks
    colinw
    Nope. I've got a guitar playing rabbit as my avatar.

    Mainly because I couldn't find a small enough image of Cacophonix.

    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    Jojo that is Dylan off the Magic Roundabout I think...must have been based on Bob Dylan.
    • Dill
    • By Dill 13th Oct 16, 7:11 PM
    • 1,664 Posts
    • 3,113 Thanks
    Dill
    But he doesn't write literature. At best he writes some poetic song lyrics, though IMO Paul Simon and Tanita Tikaram write more high-brow stuff than he does.

    The Nobel Prize for Literature should go to a serious author.
    • tommix
    • By tommix 13th Oct 16, 7:19 PM
    • 32,919 Posts
    • 135,192 Thanks
    tommix
    He wrote the soundscape of an entire generation





    He was, it's true, of his times and looking back now as I do from my ageing senior citizen's bath chair (or, well, almost) I can no more imagine those times without Dylan than I can conceive of them without Lennon, McCartney, Jagger, Richards, Davies, Hendrix, Parsons, Wilson, Joplin.





    Originally posted by codger
    I agree with everything you've written apart from Nicholas Parsons..Although he was very good as a presenter of 'Sale of the Century', Imo he wasn't in the same league as Hendrix, Jagger, Joplin etc.

    No doubt about it though, Dylan captured the zeitgeist of a generation..
    Last edited by tommix; 13-10-2016 at 7:21 PM.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 13th Oct 16, 7:19 PM
    • 21,276 Posts
    • 81,828 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Jojo that is Dylan off the Magic Roundabout I think...must have been based on Bob Dylan.
    Originally posted by colinw
    I know. But from my point of view, coming in from Infant School, he was just a rabbit with a guitar. And whilst the English version may have named him Dylan, his original character was a Spanish rabbit called Flappy.

    I know more about this than is seemly, don't I?
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • mattytun
    • By mattytun 13th Oct 16, 7:36 PM
    • 12,430 Posts
    • 223,997 Thanks
    mattytun
    When I was a small lad, the girl that stayed next door to us used to play him all the time on her record player.
    Can't sleep, quit counting sheep and talk directly to the shepherd
    • codger
    • By codger 13th Oct 16, 7:50 PM
    • 1,348 Posts
    • 1,973 Thanks
    codger


    I agree with everything you've written apart from Nicholas Parsons..Although he was very good as a presenter of 'Sale of the Century', Imo he wasn't in the same league as Hendrix, Jagger, Joplin etc.

    No doubt about it though, Dylan captured the zeitgeist of a generation..
    Originally posted by tommix
    Thanks, tommix. Loved it.

    PS: though Nicholas is considerably older than I am, and doubtless feels a wistfulness that will only be appeased when Glen Miller returns safely to Bedford, I'm led to believe he does have quite a fine singing voice. I guess the other consideration is that Nicholas, if and when he does ask St Peter to speak without pause or repetition for just a minute, is unlikely to have his reputation burnished further by departing this life from a Californian national park.
    • fierystormcloud
    • By fierystormcloud 13th Oct 16, 7:51 PM
    • 1,206 Posts
    • 3,658 Thanks
    fierystormcloud
    To me, this is a 'wait, WHAT?' award. I just don't get the fuss about him or the music, as it's not particularly remarkable in composition, even when he actually wrote something himself from scratch. But he's still alive, unlike other artists whose lyrics and compositions resonate more with me, so I guess that, combined with the adulation he gets from certain demographics, helps.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    Same here. It may not go down well saying this, but I am not a fan of Dylan, and find him highly over-rated.
    Only 3 and a bit weeks til Christmas! :
    • melbury
    • By melbury 13th Oct 16, 7:52 PM
    • 8,945 Posts
    • 12,529 Thanks
    melbury
    Brilliant news, he certainly deserves it for writing so many inspiring songs - he was (is) a unique talent that many of us grew up with.

    The youth of today simply could not imagine the enormous changes that took place in the 1960's and his music is so much a part of that.
    Stopped smoking 27/12/2007, but could start again at any time

    • Dill
    • By Dill 13th Oct 16, 9:49 PM
    • 1,664 Posts
    • 3,113 Thanks
    Dill
    Brilliant news, he certainly deserves it for writing so many inspiring songs - he was (is) a unique talent that many of us grew up with.

    The youth of today simply could not imagine the enormous changes that took place in the 1960's and his music is so much a part of that.
    Originally posted by melbury
    I'm not dissing his talent as a performer and songwriter, but the Nobel Prize for Literature? Come on!

    He's not a very good singer, either, he's got a terrible voice
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 14th Oct 16, 8:43 AM
    • 20,683 Posts
    • 52,637 Thanks
    pollypenny
    When the jelly-faced women all sneeze
    Hear the one with the mustache say, "Jeeze
    I can't find my knees"

    or

    They'll stone ya when you're walkin' on the floor
    They'll stone ya when you're walkin' to the door
    But I would not feel so all alone
    Everybody must get stoned.


    Seems more like a teenager's exercise in finding words that rhyme for their English homework than anything profound and deeply meaningful to me.
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted


    Absolutely!

    I do like Bob Dylan - as a singer and writer of folk-ish songs. And he chose his name as he loved Dylan Thomas.

    But Bob Dylan - you're no Dylan Thomas, you're no poet!
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • codger
    • By codger 14th Oct 16, 11:23 AM
    • 1,348 Posts
    • 1,973 Thanks
    codger
    Same here. It may not go down well saying this, but I am not a fan of Dylan, and find him highly over-rated.
    Originally posted by fierystormcloud
    It does go down well though.

    It also goes to the core of Dylan's writing: that everyone is entitled to her / his own opinion and her / his own system of belief, a message he articulated on behalf of one generation to other generations who subscribed to no such notion.

    Disagreement about Dylan without care of consequence is exactly what Dylan was, and still is, all about.
    • codger
    • By codger 14th Oct 16, 11:39 AM
    • 1,348 Posts
    • 1,973 Thanks
    codger
    Absolutely! I do like Bob Dylan - as a singer and writer of folk-ish songs. And he chose his name as he loved Dylan Thomas. But Bob Dylan - you're no Dylan Thomas, you're no poet!
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    He wasn't the town marshall in the 1950s TV series Gunsmoke, either, but that didn't prevent him from thinking that 'Matt Dillon' sounded, er, cool. Having subsequently read the works of major European and American writers, he decided that 'Dylan' was actually even more. . . cool:

    “I haven't read that much of Dylan Thomas... It wasn't that I was inspired by reading some of his poetry and going “Aha!” and changing my name to Dylan. If I thought he was that great, I would have sung his poems and could just have easily changed my name to Thomas. . .” [Playboy magazine, June 1978.]
    • redux
    • By redux 14th Oct 16, 12:35 PM
    • 15,558 Posts
    • 18,362 Thanks
    redux


    I agree with everything you've written apart from Nicholas Parsons..Although he was very good as a presenter of 'Sale of the Century', Imo he wasn't in the same league as Hendrix, Jagger, Joplin etc.
    Originally posted by tommix
    Oh. I hadn't spotted the family likeness myself.

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