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  • FIRST POST
    • Mysteek
    • By Mysteek 13th Oct 16, 12:33 PM
    • 211Posts
    • 480Thanks
    Mysteek
    Been through the tunnel and Seen the Light, But Need to Keep it Burning Bright!
    • #1
    • 13th Oct 16, 12:33 PM
    Been through the tunnel and Seen the Light, But Need to Keep it Burning Bright! 13th Oct 16 at 12:33 PM
    If it’s one thing I’ve learned since becoming debt free (and there have been many both during and after), is that that is not the end of the journey it’s just one step along the road to get where I need/want to be and achieve. I think that this was the mistake I made, it was such a relief to pay off all the debt that I just lost focus and need to get back into the swing again.

    Encouraged by Seasidegal58 (thank you x) I have started a new diary to keep me on track for the next step in my financial life. Although not strictly a debt free diary, I want to apply the same principles as if I was paying off debt.

    With retirement looming in the next few years I sometimes feel I am running out of time, but initially these are the things I need to start putting my money into:

    • Retirement fund
    • House stuff – this had been neglected when in debt (new shower room, new bathroom, new boiler, new carpets, decorating etc. etc. the list goes on)
    • Emergency Fund (£1,000) – did have one but it got spent L
    There are other things we need to save for but to start with I need to apportion my spare money to the above 3, as I consider these are my priorities at the moment. I will probably put the largest amount into the house fund so we can get the things done quicker, maybe £250 into the RF and £100 into the EF, but will probably move things around as I go along. OH too will be adding his spare cash when he can, but he has to save up for his insurance end of December (its high due to his job) and possibly will need a new car next year L

    One other is overpayments to the mortgage. I have already paid the maximum 10% OP’s allowed this year and the new allowance is due to come into effect in February so I shan’t worry about that for now. I lent DD2 nearly £500 to get a new washer and dryer which will get repaid in January so intend to use that to kick start the mortgage OP fund.

    I joined a few challenges, I just love the £1 a day for Xmas! My OH gets paid a lot in cash and so it’s easy for him to pop a £1 in a jar each day, plus any other change he has. Then every so often the money is paid into the back in a specific savings account I have set up. This has been brilliant as I have had the money there to take advantage of any offers. I have already got the majority of my Christmas presents without spending any of my own money and 3 months savings still to come. It’s definitely one challenge I will be continuing next year! Also we haven’t used any of our Nectar points all year, so £78 to go towards Xmas food so far, plus a £10 gift card I converted from points I had earned on a purchase I made through a company reward scheme. So hoping for around £100 to go towards food for Christmas. I feel so good that this is under control and I won’t have to spend the whole of next year paying for it.

    I think we’ve been spending too much on food, or rather food plus any other distracting nice things we see as we shop in the supermarkets. I need to start and get this under control again and try and set a budget again. More stews coming up I think!

    Situation at work is still a bit fragile, more talk of rationalisation/reorganisation next year, but can’t let this distract me.

    A bit of good news, my DD2 is expecting grandchild no. 2 - 5 days to due date! So excited!

    For anyone who is interested my DF diary is entitled "I Wanna See The Light"
    MFIT #73 - Pay all mortgage off in 3 years £46,400£34,295 PAID £12,105
Page 1
    • Seasidegal58
    • By Seasidegal58 13th Oct 16, 9:22 PM
    • 495 Posts
    • 2,478 Thanks
    Seasidegal58
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 9:22 PM
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 9:22 PM
    Lovely shiny new diary! . And wonderful news about the new little Mysteek! You must all be on tenterhooks!

    And you have intimated in the past that you aren't very well organised! I think your Xmas preparations are wonderfully organised and so very MSE! I've only bought a couple of pressies so far!

    I know you'll get the food budgeting under control as well once you have put your mind to it. Budgeting I think is the key to everything. Once you know where everything is to be allocated it makes the whole process so much easier.

    Great goals too and well thought out. My next goal after the emergency fund is a new kitchen as I will probably move nearer to DD after retirement and want to get the flat up to scratch before selling.

    Re emergency fund - I can't tell you how much the the relief is of having this cushion. After years of emergency credit card purchases its wonderful!

    Hope work sorts itself out x

    Keep posting! (Said in the style of Tess and Claudia at end of Strictly!)
    Finally Debt Free! - July 2016
    Scrimpy Goal - Emergency Fund - £10,000
    Currently: £6027.22 (25/11/2016)

    My debt free diary - " Paid off the £31,000 - BUT still scrimping!"

    NST: December 2016- NSDs: 1/15
    • Seasidegal58
    • By Seasidegal58 13th Oct 16, 9:24 PM
    • 495 Posts
    • 2,478 Thanks
    Seasidegal58
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 9:24 PM
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 9:24 PM
    ..... and love your diary's title!
    Finally Debt Free! - July 2016
    Scrimpy Goal - Emergency Fund - £10,000
    Currently: £6027.22 (25/11/2016)

    My debt free diary - " Paid off the £31,000 - BUT still scrimping!"

    NST: December 2016- NSDs: 1/15
    • Mysteek
    • By Mysteek 18th Oct 16, 1:16 PM
    • 211 Posts
    • 480 Thanks
    Mysteek
    • #4
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:16 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:16 PM
    Hi Seasidegal, thanks so much for popping in, I need to try and post a bit more often but time flies these days! Hope everything is ok with you.


    Can't remember saying I wasn't very organized, perhaps I was having a down day at the time. Its one of the things I'm known for at work, if they want something organized they give it to me lol. Hmm perhaps I am when I get paid for it ha ha.


    Just added up the spends at the supermarket this month, nearly £300! This has definitely got to stop, OH is bad with this as he can pop in and get milk or bread during the day but always seems to end up buying other stuff that we don't need. Slapped wrists for him!


    We've had Sky for last year but now the 50% offer is due to expire next month we have given notice to cancel it and got fibre optic at half price for a further year, so all in all saving around £50 a month.


    Also, my phone contract finishes in December, its gone up from £33.99 (I know!!) to £34.79 due to increases, so am thinking of changing to SIM only deal. Phone is ok, just got a new battery and SD card so I have more memory so hoping it will last me another couple of years. Fingers crossed!


    I think I have to do more on the day to day budgeting, I'm ok on the big stuff but the little things tends to just float on by. I tried YNAB but sort of drifted back to my tried and tested spreadsheets. I somehow don't fancy paying monthly for ever for something that is supposed to help in saving me money.


    Still waiting on baby, thought it would happen this weekend but he is obviously too comfy where he is.


    Oh well I suppose I had better get back to work as I'm doing this update in my lunch break.
    MFIT #73 - Pay all mortgage off in 3 years £46,400£34,295 PAID £12,105
    • Mysteek
    • By Mysteek 18th Oct 16, 1:20 PM
    • 211 Posts
    • 480 Thanks
    Mysteek
    • #5
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:20 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Oct 16, 1:20 PM
    Thanks for liking my title Seasidegal, it took me ages to think of it lol. There are so many clever and witty diary titles
    MFIT #73 - Pay all mortgage off in 3 years £46,400£34,295 PAID £12,105
    • Seasidegal58
    • By Seasidegal58 18th Oct 16, 9:27 PM
    • 495 Posts
    • 2,478 Thanks
    Seasidegal58
    • #6
    • 18th Oct 16, 9:27 PM
    • #6
    • 18th Oct 16, 9:27 PM
    Hi Mysteek

    I thought you may have had a baby announcement to make but I love the idea of the comfy infant

    The food spends can creep up so easily, but excellent news on Sky

    Re phone - there are some good deals about. I was PAYG for ages but it wasn't giving me enough minutes or downloads. I was with O2 and they let me keep my number and I now have a rolling one month contract with lots more minutes and data. it is £17 but I have a one year discount so £14.65 at moment.

    I think keeping your own spreadsheets for budgeting is fine. You do what suits you best. I first got YNAB very cheaply when it was sold on a one off payment. Ive got so used to it I can't let it go!

    Hope you have some exciting news soon!
    Finally Debt Free! - July 2016
    Scrimpy Goal - Emergency Fund - £10,000
    Currently: £6027.22 (25/11/2016)

    My debt free diary - " Paid off the £31,000 - BUT still scrimping!"

    NST: December 2016- NSDs: 1/15
    • Seasidegal58
    • By Seasidegal58 20th Oct 16, 12:56 PM
    • 495 Posts
    • 2,478 Thanks
    Seasidegal58
    • #7
    • 20th Oct 16, 12:56 PM
    • #7
    • 20th Oct 16, 12:56 PM
    Hi Mysteek


    Any news yet!


    x
    Finally Debt Free! - July 2016
    Scrimpy Goal - Emergency Fund - £10,000
    Currently: £6027.22 (25/11/2016)

    My debt free diary - " Paid off the £31,000 - BUT still scrimping!"

    NST: December 2016- NSDs: 1/15
    • webitha
    • By webitha 20th Oct 16, 9:00 PM
    • 4,642 Posts
    • 9,572 Thanks
    webitha
    • #8
    • 20th Oct 16, 9:00 PM
    • #8
    • 20th Oct 16, 9:00 PM
    I'm the same as you hun, why pay when I can get my pet teenage geek set me up a simple spreadsheet, I keep looking at it even when i have nothing to add lol... I'ts addictive, and that the reason my debt is now £3950.00 instead of the £15k it was 3 years ago

    p.s any news????
    If we can put a man on the moon...how come we cant put them all there?

    • Mysteek
    • By Mysteek 20th Oct 16, 10:09 PM
    • 211 Posts
    • 480 Thanks
    Mysteek
    • #9
    • 20th Oct 16, 10:09 PM
    • #9
    • 20th Oct 16, 10:09 PM
    Thanks for asking Seasidegal and webitha, but no news as yet, all signs looking good but not kick started into full labour yet. So I met DD2 and GD after work and we popped to local shopping centre for a look round as we thought walking might help. Little one was hungry so we called into M&S cafe and I treated them to a snack. Then I sort of accidentally bought the baby and GD something from the clothes section at M&S (with the 20% off voucher) and then GD a half price toy from Sainsburys. Ahem so not a very MSE day today, not even budgeted for so been very bad in one respect but have cheered 2 of the most important people in my life up a bit today. Will just have to put a bit less in the house fund this month.

    Hope you're feeling better now Seasidegal x

    Webitha I'm the spreadsheet geek in our family lol. I keep changing my mind as to how I'm going to achieve what I want just so that I can create a new spreadsheet I think. I did buy the full version of YNAB after the free trial but I just started to drift back to my own spreadsheets. I think its because I like to check my bank account every morning when I get to work and update my spreadsheet. I can't download YNAB onto my work laptop and I don't really like the phone app. I agree they are very addictive lol. Well done BTW on getting your debt down, that's an excellent result and it won't be too long now before its all gone!
    Last edited by Mysteek; 20-10-2016 at 10:12 PM.
    MFIT #73 - Pay all mortgage off in 3 years £46,400£34,295 PAID £12,105
    • Seasidegal58
    • By Seasidegal58 23rd Oct 16, 9:37 PM
    • 495 Posts
    • 2,478 Thanks
    Seasidegal58
    Any news?!
    Finally Debt Free! - July 2016
    Scrimpy Goal - Emergency Fund - £10,000
    Currently: £6027.22 (25/11/2016)

    My debt free diary - " Paid off the £31,000 - BUT still scrimping!"

    NST: December 2016- NSDs: 1/15
    • Mysteek
    • By Mysteek 24th Oct 16, 9:20 AM
    • 211 Posts
    • 480 Thanks
    Mysteek
    Yessssssssss!!!!!


    Little boy delivered yesterday evening, both doing well. Seen photos and he looks gorgeous! Looked after little GD overnight so really tired today lol


    Thank you for asking x
    MFIT #73 - Pay all mortgage off in 3 years £46,400£34,295 PAID £12,105
    • try harder
    • By try harder 24th Oct 16, 11:15 PM
    • 180 Posts
    • 457 Thanks
    try harder
    Wow ,wonderful news,you must be feeling so happy.
    • Seasidegal58
    • By Seasidegal58 25th Oct 16, 2:24 PM
    • 495 Posts
    • 2,478 Thanks
    Seasidegal58
    That's fantastic! Many congratulations to your DD and OH - and especially the MSE grandma!


    You'll be really busy now for a bit I should think, but looking forward to hearing all the news soon!
    Finally Debt Free! - July 2016
    Scrimpy Goal - Emergency Fund - £10,000
    Currently: £6027.22 (25/11/2016)

    My debt free diary - " Paid off the £31,000 - BUT still scrimping!"

    NST: December 2016- NSDs: 1/15
    • Mysteek
    • By Mysteek 27th Oct 16, 12:49 PM
    • 211 Posts
    • 480 Thanks
    Mysteek
    Just a quick update as I'm struggling to find time to post to my diary as work is very busy at the moment. There are only 2 of us that do the same job and my colleague is away this week and we just happen to have hit a busy patch. So some late leavings this week.


    Anyway, DS is gorgeous and lovely to cuddle, I think I've fallen in love again!!


    Just been having a rethink about YNAB. The spreadsheet I use is more what I would call a 'bank reconciliation statement' rather than a budgeting tool and I think I need to do more detailed budgeting. I have the 'pay once' only version and I am sure I read somewhere that they were not supporting this version after the end of the year. I would hate to be pushed into paying monthly for something I have already paid for! But I have definitely proved to myself I need to do more budgeting for the smaller things, which is exactly what YNAB is for lol


    Not as much to put away into house fund this month, as I had bought some curtains on my Next account so paid them off, and we needed a small lamp table to finish our lounge off, which I found in the sale. Oooh I think I forgot to say (admit) that we had decorated our living room and dining room, which also involved having more electrical sockets put in (we'd been wanting them for 25 years), walls skimmed, new carpet etc. so quite a bit of expense and we are now skint. But its all finished now so back to the financial drawing board.


    I'm hoping to find some time to sit over the weekend and work out a sensible budget to start next month on. Wish me luck!!!
    MFIT #73 - Pay all mortgage off in 3 years £46,400£34,295 PAID £12,105
    • Mysteek
    • By Mysteek 27th Oct 16, 12:50 PM
    • 211 Posts
    • 480 Thanks
    Mysteek
    Thank you Seasidegal and try harder for your good wishes, yes we are all happy and OH and myself are very proud parents and grandparents.
    MFIT #73 - Pay all mortgage off in 3 years £46,400£34,295 PAID £12,105
    • Seasidegal58
    • By Seasidegal58 27th Oct 16, 11:26 PM
    • 495 Posts
    • 2,478 Thanks
    Seasidegal58
    It's lovely to hear you're having lots of cuddles!

    Why don't you give your old YNAB another go to the New Year - you'll have a good idea by then whether or not it's worth paying out for the new version and carrying on with it. You get a lifetime 10% discount for being an existing user.

    I'm all for sprucing up the home as long as the cost is manageable. I've got my eye on a new kitchen once the emergency fund is finished. Well it is 16 years old and will add value to the flat when the time comes to sell!
    Finally Debt Free! - July 2016
    Scrimpy Goal - Emergency Fund - £10,000
    Currently: £6027.22 (25/11/2016)

    My debt free diary - " Paid off the £31,000 - BUT still scrimping!"

    NST: December 2016- NSDs: 1/15
    • Mysteek
    • By Mysteek 3rd Nov 16, 1:52 PM
    • 211 Posts
    • 480 Thanks
    Mysteek
    Well I’ve done it, I’ve resurrected YN@B and set it all up again! Was a bit of a faff though as I’d bought it through Steam so had to install that software again, forgot the password and had to go through hoops to access my account with them. Then Steam froze my computer and I had to restart aaarrgggg! But finally got it all sorted. I’m sure I can use a copy of YN@B that doesn’t involved installing Steam first as it tries to update/validate the Steam software each and every time I want to open YN@B, which is a bit frustrating.
    So from this month I will be working to the budgets I have created, with a little tweaking here and there as required to make it work for us. Just got to get hubby to stop buying bits and bobs with cash as I want all food items to come through the bank account so I can control what’s being spent, and also getting him to stick to the shopping list!! He doesn’t seem to have the same commitment as when we were paying the debt off, but I’ve tried to get him to think of the ‘savings’ pots we are trying to build up as sort of ‘debts. Not sure if it will work but I’ll keep trying.
    I was due an uprade on my phone so changed to SIM only instead, saving about half what I was spending on contract. Just hope my phone doesn’t decide to conk out on me now.
    Sk@ due to disappear in a couple of weeks so this month will see a big reduction in subscription charges as I only have phone line and Sk@ Fibre remaining (which I’ve negotiated again for half price for 12 months), which will help enormously.
    Actually I do feel better at sorting out the budgets as we had just gotten into the habit of paying out what was needed that month and anything left over transferring into the savings accounts.
    Paid last couple of months’ “£1 a day for Xmas” money into the bank, was just over £101 with the £1 a day plus all the change. I’ve spent £29.99 of it on pressies so far and there will be this month’s to add early in December. Only a few bits left to get so should have plenty. From 1 December I will start again for next year. If I have any left from this year, what should I do with it I wonder, hmm.
    Having your own property is a bit like painting the Forth Bridge Seasidegal, its never ending lol. Our boiler is 26 years old so I think that must be a priority as our boiler service man says he wouldn't be able to get parts for it if it broke down. We don't intend moving from this house so we would like to try and get things done while I am still working, will have to hurry then lol.
    MFIT #73 - Pay all mortgage off in 3 years £46,400£34,295 PAID £12,105
    • Seasidegal58
    • By Seasidegal58 4th Nov 16, 7:51 PM
    • 495 Posts
    • 2,478 Thanks
    Seasidegal58
    [FONT=Arial]So from this month I will be working to the budgets I have created, with a little tweaking here and there as required to make it work for us. Just got to get hubby to stop buying bits and bobs with cash as I want all food items to come through the bank account so I can control what’s being spent, and also getting him to stick to the shopping list!! He doesn’t seem to have the same commitment as when we were paying the debt off, but I’ve tried to get him to think of the ‘savings’ pots we are trying to build up as sort of ‘debts. Not sure if it will work but I’ll keep trying.
    Originally posted by Mysteek
    I think sometimes think the relief of clearing down your debts puts you into a kind of holiday mode. You can think "thank goodness that's all finished with" but the money journey never really ends. Thinking of the savings as debts is a good mental trick. You seemed to have managed him well so far and I'm sure you'll succeed again!

    Well done on the Xmas pressies front. Just trying to get some lists from my lot at the moment!

    Hope the new Master Mysteek is doing well!
    Finally Debt Free! - July 2016
    Scrimpy Goal - Emergency Fund - £10,000
    Currently: £6027.22 (25/11/2016)

    My debt free diary - " Paid off the £31,000 - BUT still scrimping!"

    NST: December 2016- NSDs: 1/15
    • Mysteek
    • By Mysteek 9th Nov 16, 8:37 AM
    • 211 Posts
    • 480 Thanks
    Mysteek
    Yes I think you have hit the nail on the head there Seasidegal when you say its like being in holiday mode when you've paid your debt off, but there will be no real holidays if he doesn't get out of it soon


    Did I mention I had tried stoozing? Well I gave it a go but not for me I'm afraid so have cancelled the credit cards I opened for this purpose. Was waiting for a refund back to my last credit card before I could close it, but that's received now and I rang yesterday and closed that one. So all 3 CC's opened for stoozing now closed and I feel relieved tbh.


    Can't wait for pay day this month to start populating my categories I have created for my budgets. I will have to adjust some as we are part way through the year, but it will all sort itself out eventually.


    I have been putting 10% into my company pension since April, something that being debt free has allowed me to do. Our company has enhanced matching so they actually put more than me in at the moment so well worth doing, just wish I could have afforded to have done it sooner. In no way am I under any illusion that my company pension will afford me a luxurious retirement but just hoping that there will be enough money to tide me over between retiring and collecting my state pension. Hoping for at least a couple of years.


    I have been onto the government epension site to check how much state pension I can expect to receive (having to wait an extra 6 years for it!). I have 44 full years paid, but will need another 3 years to get my full amount as I was apparently contracted out for a number of years . Checked DH's too while I was there and whilst he only has 34 full years he has earned his full amount as he has never been contracted out.


    Trying not to spend much this month as most of my October's salary went to pay for things for the house, so trying to use food from the freezer and cupboards and just buying necessities like milk and bread for DH. I have to have gluten free so make my own bread in a breadmaker. Will need to get some money from somewhere soon though as running out of supplies. DH just had a big service done on his car, changing cam belt and stuff so his last 3 weeks money has gone to pay for that.


    Well must go and get some work done. I am aiming to try and post more but time just seems to sift through my hands like sand
    MFIT #73 - Pay all mortgage off in 3 years £46,400£34,295 PAID £12,105
    • Seasidegal58
    • By Seasidegal58 9th Nov 16, 10:13 PM
    • 495 Posts
    • 2,478 Thanks
    Seasidegal58
    If you don't need the cards for debt reducing balance transfers or every day budgeted purchasing use I think you've got the right idea. I felt so good when the last of my balance transfer cards was paid off and cut up.

    I'm like you as I was contracted out for quite a few years from my state pension. You've given me a push to get an up to date statement so I'll get cracking on that!

    Hope the new little arrival is faring well!
    Finally Debt Free! - July 2016
    Scrimpy Goal - Emergency Fund - £10,000
    Currently: £6027.22 (25/11/2016)

    My debt free diary - " Paid off the £31,000 - BUT still scrimping!"

    NST: December 2016- NSDs: 1/15
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