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  • FIRST POST
    • thescouselander
    • By thescouselander 13th Oct 16, 7:26 AM
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    thescouselander
    Neighbours garden/fence presenting a danger
    • #1
    • 13th Oct 16, 7:26 AM
    Neighbours garden/fence presenting a danger 13th Oct 16 at 7:26 AM
    The house behind ours is rented out and the tenants or landlord are not keen on maintenance. The problem is the garden is quite overgrown and the fence (which is theirs) is starting to fall down.

    I realise there is not normally much that can be done about this but there are some very prickly brambles now growing into my garden and I'd rather not have my 3 year old playing around them.

    Is there anything I can do to at least get them to fix the fence as asking hasn't worked previously and I'd have thought they'd at least have a responsibility to contain their garden.
Page 1
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 13th Oct 16, 7:28 AM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 7:28 AM
    • #2
    • 13th Oct 16, 7:28 AM
    This is a question that comes up frequently on the Net and, regrettably, the answer people give boils down to "There is nothing in law that compels people to maintain their fences".

    Sorry....

    It does seem to boil down to "He who is bothered does the work" and they can't stop you doing that - ie erecting a fence in your own garden.
    The unexamined life is not worth living.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 13th Oct 16, 7:43 AM
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    getmore4less
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 7:43 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 7:43 AM
    getting late for this year but brambles will die back with appropriate products, Roundup being a well known brand others are available.

    currently available in the sales so stock up for next year, and just cut back to the fence for now.

    new growth next year apply products as they show.

    problem is they will come back, will be an ongoing battle .

    Even if you deal with the fence yourselves brambles will grow over and sneak under if not sorted on the other side.
    Last edited by getmore4less; 13-10-2016 at 8:29 AM.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Oct 16, 7:56 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 7:56 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 7:56 AM
    Money is right. From a legal perspective, there is nothing to compel another owner to act on fencing, even if there is danger from blackberry bushes.

    There is also nothing in law to prevent you taking action to erect a suitable fence on your side of the boundary, removing the aforementioned danger at a stroke.
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • thescouselander
    • By thescouselander 13th Oct 16, 9:29 AM
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    thescouselander
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 16, 9:29 AM
    • #5
    • 13th Oct 16, 9:29 AM
    I thought that might be the case. The problem is if I do repair the fence, or erect a new one, bushes are likely to push through again.

    I might have to drop a large quantity of roundup over there. I guess this isn't allowed but I doubt they'll be bothered to do anything about it.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Oct 16, 10:10 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 16, 10:10 AM
    • #6
    • 13th Oct 16, 10:10 AM
    I used to put an extra dilute soloution of glyphosate on my rear neighbours' rambling roses every year at my old house. It wasn't enough to kill them right back, but it halted them in their tracks. The neighbour thought they were just diesease-ridden, so we were all happy.
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • paddy's mum
    • By paddy's mum 13th Oct 16, 11:14 AM
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    paddy's mum
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 16, 11:14 AM
    • #7
    • 13th Oct 16, 11:14 AM
    Roundup...currently available in the sales so stock up for next year, and just cut back to the fence for now.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    Cutting back is actually all you are allowed to do and if I found anyone flinging poison around my land, there'd be a response they didn't expect and wouldn't like!

    I get that these are tantamount to weeds but why not ASK the other folk if you may spray the brambles. If they are lazy gardeners disinclined to keep them under control, they may well be very pleased for someone else to do their work for them.

    Just slinging weedkiller about can so easily lead to accusations of criminal damage with all the trouble that can lead to. Don't go there!
    Last edited by paddy's mum; 13-10-2016 at 11:15 AM. Reason: typo
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Oct 16, 11:40 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 16, 11:40 AM
    • #8
    • 13th Oct 16, 11:40 AM
    Great use of emotive language there, but if anyone needs to get rid of brambles on their land, the best way is not to 'sling' glyphosate, but to immerse the ends of new growth in a bucket of it for half an hour or so.

    Alternatively, paint the fronds using a brush. Don't spray. No problems with accusations then.
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • paddy's mum
    • By paddy's mum 13th Oct 16, 12:23 PM
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    paddy's mum
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 16, 12:23 PM
    • #9
    • 13th Oct 16, 12:23 PM
    I take your point but the OP has no right in law to be putting anything on someone else's land, whether that be dirty water, coal dust or poisonous chemicals, without that landowner's permission.

    It was done to my garden by an obsessively tidy neighbour who thought that native hedging and wildflowers were a blot on his landscape and that dislike led him to SBK the bloomin' lot behind our backs!

    Not funny nor lawful which is why I commented as I did.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 13th Oct 16, 12:52 PM
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    getmore4less
    Cutting back is actually all you are allowed to do and if I found anyone flinging poison around my land, there'd be a response they didn't expect and wouldn't like!

    I get that these are tantamount to weeds but why not ASK the other folk if you may spray the brambles. If they are lazy gardeners disinclined to keep them under control, they may well be very pleased for someone else to do their work for them.
    Just slinging weedkiller about can so easily lead to accusations of criminal damage with all the trouble that can lead to. Don't go there!
    Originally posted by paddy's mum
    You don't go flinging/slinging anything you just apply it to the growth on your side, leave a week and cut back.

    The growth will be stunted enough to reduce the encroachment.

    Killing it off will need a much more aggressive strategy.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 13th Oct 16, 2:56 PM
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    I thought that might be the case. The problem is if I do repair the fence, or erect a new one, bushes are likely to push through again.

    I might have to drop a large quantity of roundup over there. I guess this isn't allowed but I doubt they'll be bothered to do anything about it.
    Originally posted by thescouselander
    You could be putting yourself at risk if you do that - ie of being sued for making them ill.

    There is every chance they are picking and eating their blackberries and could do so in all innocence "knowing" that nothing could have contaminated their blackberries (ie because they "know" exactly what is going on in their own garden) and then finding themselves wondering why they are ill (ie because of having, unknowingly, ingested some Roundup).

    Personally - I regard it as totally unacceptable to spray chemicals onto someone else's land except in extremis (by which I mean Japanese Knotweed or running bamboo ONLY). For anything else - your property is going to be perfectly safe - and you are NOT entitled to do that and they would have every right to deal with you "firmly" one way or another if they caught you at it.

    You don't want to know just how I'd deal with a neighbour I caught spraying chemicals onto perfectly innocent plants in my garden.....

    ************

    As for any risk of brambles sneaking through a fence - do a wall instead of a fence. It's not rocket science and I've done exactly that myself to keep outside weeds at bay.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 13-10-2016 at 3:00 PM.
    The unexamined life is not worth living.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Oct 16, 8:48 PM
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    Davesnave
    You could be putting yourself at risk if you do that - ie of being sued for making them ill.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    This seems an unlikely scenario, especially as the traces that already exist in people's bodies, generally arrive there via commercially-produced food.

    One might as well sue Sainsburys.

    However, I can see that there might be a loss of several kg of valuable blackberries......
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • thescouselander
    • By thescouselander 13th Oct 16, 10:54 PM
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    thescouselander
    You could be putting yourself at risk if you do that - ie of being sued for making them ill.

    There is every chance they are picking and eating their blackberries and could do so in all innocence "knowing" that nothing could have contaminated their blackberries (ie because they "know" exactly what is going on in their own garden) and then finding themselves wondering why they are ill (ie because of having, unknowingly, ingested some Roundup).

    Personally - I regard it as totally unacceptable to spray chemicals onto someone else's land except in extremis (by which I mean Japanese Knotweed or running bamboo ONLY). For anything else - your property is going to be perfectly safe - and you are NOT entitled to do that and they would have every right to deal with you "firmly" one way or another if they caught you at it.

    You don't want to know just how I'd deal with a neighbour I caught spraying chemicals onto perfectly innocent plants in my garden.....

    ************

    As for any risk of brambles sneaking through a fence - do a wall instead of a fence. It's not rocket science and I've done exactly that myself to keep outside weeds at bay.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention
    I cant see this leading to trouble. First of all they would need to realise the bushes have been killed - unlikely as there is plenty of other overgrowth between the bushes and the house so they wont be easy to see.

    Second they'd have to work out the bushes had been killed with weedkiller

    Thirdly they'd have to work out who it was

    Fourth they'd need some evidence to support any allegation

    So while it might technically be possible to get in trouble for sorting out the overgrowth the reality is nothing will happen apart from my problem will be solved.
    • paddy's mum
    • By paddy's mum 14th Oct 16, 10:04 AM
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    paddy's mum
    the reality is nothing will happen apart from my problem will be solved.
    Originally posted by thescouselander
    You hope!

    Do you routinely ignore the law or just the bits you don't much like?
    • Lbuk
    • By Lbuk 14th Oct 16, 11:09 AM
    • 21 Posts
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    Lbuk
    Totally sympathise with having young children and nightmare neighbours but a three year old is fully capable of realising that you don't touch pointy brambles.
    • thescouselander
    • By thescouselander 14th Oct 16, 12:10 PM
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    thescouselander
    You hope!

    Do you routinely ignore the law or just the bits you don't much like?
    Originally posted by paddy's mum
    Well, I wouldn't say I'm a prolific law breaker but I'm not one for blindly following rules either so if there's justification I wouldn't lose any sleep about ignoring the law here.
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