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  • FIRST POST
    • soundman111
    • By soundman111 12th Oct 16, 8:48 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 0Thanks
    soundman111
    Soundproofing Help
    • #1
    • 12th Oct 16, 8:48 PM
    Soundproofing Help 12th Oct 16 at 8:48 PM
    Dear All,

    Hope you are well.

    I have alot of trouble from noise linked to our neighbors bathroom, that links to our bedroom. We can hear noises such as bathroom appliances, talking, and loud banging sounds. I have a home cinema system in my bedroom newly installed a few days ago.

    I would not be able to watch anything without disturbance (haven't had it on yet) and i cannot sleep due to this noise. I have raised this issue of noise with the neighbors, and they have quietened down alot, but it is still terrible. It is due to poor sound insulation between the party walls.

    I want to soundproof this wall and have a few solutions i need advice on please:

    Solution 1 - 7.5cm Independent wall with acoustic materials, sound barrier etc
    Solution 2 - 10cm Independent wall with acoustic materials, sound barrier etc

    I kindly wanted any advice on what uplift in sound reduction there would be on a 10cm Independent wall. The bedroom is small anyway and would prefer to go for the 7.5cm Independent wall, but it is a complete guess, which solution would be adequate for my problem.

    It is a hard judgement, any help would be greatly appreciated. I am keen to go for the 7.5cm wall but if i still hear these banging sounds i may wish i had greater space loss with the 10cm wall, its a tricky judgement to make.

    Many thanks for your time and understanding.

    Yours sincerely,

    Paul
Page 1
    • Chanes
    • By Chanes 12th Oct 16, 9:34 PM
    • 604 Posts
    • 345 Thanks
    Chanes
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 16, 9:34 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Oct 16, 9:34 PM
    I remember helping a friend soundproof a room from a teenagers room next door, the wall was battened; acoustic bars were fitted; insulation was fitted and then the plasterboard was attached to the acoustic bars and a silicone gel around the edges.

    We might as well have put up a few sheets of newspaper.

    Get a company in who know how to do it, it's trickier than it appears.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 13th Oct 16, 6:30 AM
    • 2,886 Posts
    • 1,818 Thanks
    Furts
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 6:30 AM
    • #3
    • 13th Oct 16, 6:30 AM
    Sound can transmit through your structure like the the walls, but it can also be air borne and come through gaps. You will not cure the problem because the sound could be coming through the ceiling or the floor - and your wall will not cure this. Even your independent wall is flawed because there is the concept of flanking sound - the sound comes around the party wall through the structure.

    If you proceed with your wall concept I would advise adding heavy carpet and underlay, or even a sound deadening mat under the underlay. Also look at your ceiling insulation - the more you have the better matters will be. Finally all joints, and sealing of gaps must be meticulous

    Ultimately bear in mind bedrooms were never built, or designed, for home cinema systems. So you could then be receiving complaints from your neighbour.
    • jenny-wren
    • By jenny-wren 13th Oct 16, 9:17 AM
    • 732 Posts
    • 294 Thanks
    jenny-wren
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 9:17 AM
    • #4
    • 13th Oct 16, 9:17 AM
    We've had problems in the past with noisy neighbours. You could hear every cough, sneeze ... and worse! We used a product called 'greenglue'. You basically sandwich the greenglue between the existing wall and a layer of plasterboard and then get the wall skimmed. From memory the stuff doesn't completely harden which means it absorbs some of the sound coming through the wall. It's still a work in progress as the wall hasn't been skimmed yet but it does seem to reduce the noise.

    http://www.greengluecompany.com/

    Thankfully the neighbours from hell moved out and we never hear a peep from our new neighbour.
    Norn Iron Club Member 330
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