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  • FIRST POST
    • ed44
    • By ed44 12th Oct 16, 8:44 PM
    • 15Posts
    • 21Thanks
    ed44
    TD Direct sold to Interactive Investor
    • #1
    • 12th Oct 16, 8:44 PM
    TD Direct sold to Interactive Investor 12th Oct 16 at 8:44 PM
    https://www.moneymarketing.co.uk/interactive-investor-acquires-td-direct/

    http://www.tddirectinvesting.co.uk/special-pages/customer-information/?_ga=1.259966666.1942136220.1414500024

    No change to the TD service in the short term.
    Last edited by ed44; 12-10-2016 at 9:05 PM. Reason: changed link
Page 2
    • Dird
    • By Dird 14th Oct 16, 8:52 AM
    • 2,366 Posts
    • 1,373 Thanks
    Dird
    on just about all the major platforms
    Originally posted by JohnRo
    Do any of them show your amount invested vs current valuation on a single page? Annoys the heck out of me that Fidelity only show current valuation & you have to go back & add up the transactions for each fund
    Mortgage (Nov 15): £79,950 | Cashback sites: £785 | Current accounts: 15
    Mortgage (Nov 16): £76,486 | £30k in 2016 #96: £27,530 (91.7%)
    • JohnRo
    • By JohnRo 14th Oct 16, 11:08 AM
    • 2,017 Posts
    • 1,666 Thanks
    JohnRo
    Yes, without trawling through old files, most platforms I've used will show you the investment book cost and the current valuation side by side on each line of stock.

    CSD, HL, iWeb and TD definitely do. I've not been with the others for some time so cannot comment on them.

    I left Cavendish (Fidelity lite) because I hated the portal, at the time it couldn't even display a simple cash held on account figure and no amount of menu digging could produce it.
    'We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.' ― Albert Einstein
    'Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored.' ― Aldous Huxley
    • TCA
    • By TCA 14th Oct 16, 12:31 PM
    • 1,193 Posts
    • 626 Thanks
    TCA
    while i have no idea what the new td direct / interactive investor charging structure will be, i can't say that i'm very hopeful about the prospects of being able to continue to pay no holding charges for a S&S ISA that only contains shares (no funds).
    Originally posted by grey gym sock
    This is where I'm at as well. I was planning on moving more to TD Direct but that's on hold now. I have an iWeb account which I opened before they started the £200 opening fee, so looks like they might get more of my business. Although no doubt they'll start hiking fees at some point soon too.
    • cloud_dog
    • By cloud_dog 14th Oct 16, 4:53 PM
    • 2,862 Posts
    • 1,466 Thanks
    cloud_dog
    The OH is with TD. I'll wait to see how the jointing process works but I'm not enamoured about going to III.

    Our dealing/ISA accounts do not contain UTs/OIECs and my account is with X-O so it may be that is where it ends up. X-O is good but basic.
    Personal Responsibility - Sad but True

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    • riderfromthenorth
    • By riderfromthenorth 14th Oct 16, 7:38 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    riderfromthenorth
    I received my email today from TD. I'm not expecting good things to come from this. I left II post RDR.
    • darkidoe
    • By darkidoe 14th Oct 16, 8:43 PM
    • 642 Posts
    • 691 Thanks
    darkidoe
    I am with you, greygymsock! TD was the ideal platform of holders of shares, etfs, in a ISA wrapper with minimal trading. We need a TD leavers thread if this possible fee structure changes comes to pass..
    Save 12K in 2016 # 8 £16 253.55/12 000 (135.45%) Achieved!
    • rail.link
    • By rail.link 14th Oct 16, 10:36 PM
    • 230 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    rail.link
    Waiting to see what happens when they take over might backfire, if they introduce an exit charge.
    I'll be leaving whilst the going is good, I think.
    • grey gym sock
    • By grey gym sock 15th Oct 16, 12:44 AM
    • 3,831 Posts
    • 3,228 Thanks
    grey gym sock
    Waiting to see what happens when they take over might backfire, if they introduce an exit charge.
    I'll be leaving whilst the going is good, I think.
    Originally posted by rail.link
    the current terms of service specifically say that, when you're given notice of a change in the terms, "you may close your Account without penalty or loss of credit interest within 30 days of receipt of that notice" (16.3). which implies you would have a chance to exit before any exit charge would take effect.

    the other practical point is: will the provider you move to also (currently) have no exit charges?

    i do find the idea of moving in anticipation of adverse changes in charges a little odd. it won't really work unless you're clairvoyant or lucky ... what you could do now is think about where you might move to if there's a need to move.
    • Economic
    • By Economic 15th Oct 16, 9:56 AM
    • 8 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    Economic
    Cavendish~~
    Originally posted by Dird
    Thanks, but I mainly invest in shares (mainly investment trusts and REITS).
    • rail.link
    • By rail.link 15th Oct 16, 10:49 AM
    • 230 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    rail.link
    the current terms of service specifically say that, when you're given notice of a change in the terms, "you may close your Account without penalty or loss of credit interest within 30 days of receipt of that notice" (16.3). which implies you would have a chance to exit before any exit charge would take effect.

    Those are the current terms. Would they remain the same on take over ? Don't forget this is iii we're talking about.
    Plus they retain your debit card details and are quite happy to use them even when the account has been closed.
    I'd much rather leave while TD is still in charge.


    the other practical point is: will the provider you move to also (currently) have no exit charges?

    Yes, already sorted.

    i do find the idea of moving in anticipation of adverse changes in charges a little odd. it won't really work unless you're clairvoyant or lucky ... what you could do now is think about where you might move to if there's a need to move.
    Originally posted by grey gym sock
    I appreciate what you're saying but to each their own.
    It works for me because I don't want to be part of an organisation where iii are running things.

    • grey gym sock
    • By grey gym sock 15th Oct 16, 11:22 AM
    • 3,831 Posts
    • 3,228 Thanks
    grey gym sock
    Those are the current terms. Would they remain the same on take over ?
    Originally posted by rail.link
    yes, because a take-over merely assigns td direct's rights and obligations under the contract to another company (iii). if they want to amend the terms, they are then obliged to follow the process under the existing terms.

    It works for me because I don't want to be part of an organisation where iii are running things.
    ok, so it's not actually about charges for you. you don't want to deal with iii, regardless of what they charge.
    • premierfella
    • By premierfella 15th Oct 16, 4:59 PM
    • 851 Posts
    • 466 Thanks
    premierfella
    I'm not necessarily suggesting that TD Direct customers rush through the exit door, but the risk of hanging on for if/when iii decide to implement a charging structure more akin to their own one isn't that you'll have exit fees to worry about, but that they could be deluged with transfer out requests which take them a significantly longer period to process than would normally be the case.
    • Lakeuk
    • By Lakeuk 15th Oct 16, 10:09 PM
    • 1,048 Posts
    • 551 Thanks
    Lakeuk
    The broker market is going to get disrupted over the coming years, cutting costs to gain market share in cheaper pricing to customers.
    • ed44
    • By ed44 15th Oct 16, 11:44 PM
    • 15 Posts
    • 21 Thanks
    ed44
    When Selftrade was sold to Equitini, they offered a one-year free transfer out offer, so you could try the new service.
    The downside of that was it took them four months to transfer out to TD.


    I see HL are now offering cash back for transfers in. Tempted...
    • premierfella
    • By premierfella 16th Oct 16, 12:28 PM
    • 851 Posts
    • 466 Thanks
    premierfella
    Yep, got that letter from HL. I have been tempted to transfer under their cashback offer before but never actually got around to sending the forms off. £500 is easily enough to have me sending them off now as it will cover their charges for the next few years AND exit fees if they do something to annoy me!
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 16th Oct 16, 2:51 PM
    • 5,101 Posts
    • 9,006 Thanks
    bowlhead99
    The HL £500 is only for investors moving over £150k to the platform, but would cover a decade worth of fees if all you hold is shares, investment trusts and ETFs and don't do much trading. If that's you, it's pretty good! It covers only 9 months fees if you hold funds, those fees being 50-80% higher than other percentage-based providers.

    Youinvest also have an up-to £500 transfer-in offer, but in theirs the idea is to just reimburse you your exit costs at up to £35 per line of stock plus up to £100 for general exit fees. They offer it for much smaller pots - only £20k needed instead of £150k to qualify.

    The Youinvest one isn't as lucrative as the HL one because their money is only a reimbursement against actual costs. But they can be cheaper on an ongoing basis depending what you actually hold and how frequently you trade etc.
    • TCA
    • By TCA 16th Oct 16, 3:05 PM
    • 1,193 Posts
    • 626 Thanks
    TCA
    I see HL are now offering cash back for transfers in. Tempted...
    Originally posted by ed44
    Thanks for posting that. I'm not a customer so wasn't aware of it. I'm also tempted. I have a few unwrapped investment trusts with Best Invest that I was planning to move to TD, but they could now go to HL (plus some more from TD) and I'd cover the costs of the BI transfers with the cashback and benefit from zero holding fees in HL's Fund and Share Account.
    • economic
    • By economic 16th Oct 16, 8:29 PM
    • 627 Posts
    • 270 Thanks
    economic
    Do Interactive Investor have an annual platform charge for index funds?

    looking at their charges i dont see how they are any different to TD. similar sort of charges.
    • cloud_dog
    • By cloud_dog 17th Oct 16, 10:07 AM
    • 2,862 Posts
    • 1,466 Thanks
    cloud_dog
    Do Interactive Investor have an annual platform charge for index funds?

    looking at their charges i dont see how they are any different to TD. similar sort of charges.
    Originally posted by economic
    The basics of the TD charging structure is similar to III, i.e. quarterly fee, but.... with TD there are ways of negating the quarterly fee, i.e. have a regular investment set up or have a certain amount of money in investments (and that's not very high).
    Personal Responsibility - Sad but True

    Sometimes.... I am like a dog with a bone
    • grey gym sock
    • By grey gym sock 17th Oct 16, 1:38 PM
    • 3,831 Posts
    • 3,228 Thanks
    grey gym sock
    td & ii's charges are very different for funds (as opposed to shares).

    td have a 0.3% annual holding charge for funds. ii have no holding charge.

    ii charge for buying/selling funds. td don't.
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