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    • secondary school teacher
    • By secondary school teacher 11th Oct 16, 7:22 PM
    • 1Posts
    • 0Thanks
    secondary school teacher
    0 WOW
    Do you have to declare new medical conditions after you've got travel insurance?
    • #1
    • 11th Oct 16, 7:22 PM
    0 WOW
    Do you have to declare new medical conditions after you've got travel insurance? 11th Oct 16 at 7:22 PM
    Hi,

    This is my first post and I could only find 'new thread' in this section, so I'm probably posting this in the worng place - apologies!

    So here goes:

    In April I bought an annual travel insurance policy with StaySure Insurance (by looking for good priced insurance through MSE). Last week I received an email, and today a letter from the company. They say that I need to let them know if our medical history has changed since buying the policy, and if so, they will charge me for updating their records. If I don't tell them any changes (including the fact that we've had dr's appts or started taking new tablets), our insurance is now void.

    Is this normal or are they taking the mickey?

    Thanks!
Page 1
    • helcat26
    • By helcat26 25th Oct 16, 2:54 PM
    • 861 Posts
    • 2,270 Thanks
    helcat26
    • #2
    • 25th Oct 16, 2:54 PM
    • #2
    • 25th Oct 16, 2:54 PM
    It is usually in the small print that you need to inform them if it is a significant illness, or something that may impact your ability to travel eg if you have a heart attack, stroke, thrombosis etc.
    Not if you have a cold and take antibiotics .


    If you have had a significant illness since taking out the policy, you can contact them and either pay additional cover, or agree that you would not be covered for a claim based on the significant illness.
    • DomRavioli
    • By DomRavioli 25th Oct 16, 3:01 PM
    • 2,850 Posts
    • 4,755 Thanks
    DomRavioli
    • #3
    • 25th Oct 16, 3:01 PM
    • #3
    • 25th Oct 16, 3:01 PM
    Not if you have a cold and take antibiotics .

    A cold is a virus. Anribiotics will do nothing.
    Originally posted by helcat26
    Hi,

    This is my first post and I could only find 'new thread' in this section, so I'm probably posting this in the worng place - apologies!

    So here goes:

    In April I bought an annual travel insurance policy with StaySure Insurance (by looking for good priced insurance through MSE). Last week I received an email, and today a letter from the company. They say that I need to let them know if our medical history has changed since buying the policy, and if so, they will charge me for updating their records. If I don't tell them any changes (including the fact that we've had dr's appts or started taking new tablets), our insurance is now void.

    Is this normal or are they taking the mickey?

    Thanks!
    Originally posted by secondary school teacher
    Very normal. If your condition improves or worsens, you need to tell them as it will affect the cover they provide. Even if you visit a doctor and meds are changed, you need to let them know, as this can change your risk profile.

    They cannot insure someone if they don't know the insurable risk. Its that simple.
    Observe, Adapt, Overcome.
    SPC 2015 #497
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 25th Oct 16, 3:26 PM
    • 11,449 Posts
    • 15,306 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    • #4
    • 25th Oct 16, 3:26 PM
    • #4
    • 25th Oct 16, 3:26 PM
    I wouldn't worry too much about it. It is a bit tedious, but whenever I have rung up to declare anything, it has just been noted and there has been no extra charge.
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • photome
    • By photome 25th Oct 16, 4:08 PM
    • 11,996 Posts
    • 7,514 Thanks
    photome
    • #5
    • 25th Oct 16, 4:08 PM
    • #5
    • 25th Oct 16, 4:08 PM
    I wouldn't worry too much about it. It is a bit tedious, but whenever I have rung up to declare anything, it has just been noted and there has been no extra charge.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    That is my experinence as well,
    I have a yearly policy and they dont seem to care what happens between renewals as long as you update them at renewal so they can provide the correct cover the following year
    • helcat26
    • By helcat26 28th Oct 16, 6:12 PM
    • 861 Posts
    • 2,270 Thanks
    helcat26
    • #6
    • 28th Oct 16, 6:12 PM
    • #6
    • 28th Oct 16, 6:12 PM
    OK I was being hasty in my reply. A secondary respiratory infection requiring antibiotics!


    I had a pulmonary embolism and they gave me the choice of paying an additional £60 or not being covered for issues resulting from it. That was Columbus travel if I am allowed to say that.
    • katejo
    • By katejo 28th Oct 16, 6:43 PM
    • 2,810 Posts
    • 1,066 Thanks
    katejo
    • #7
    • 28th Oct 16, 6:43 PM
    • #7
    • 28th Oct 16, 6:43 PM
    That is my experinence as well,
    I have a yearly policy and they dont seem to care what happens between renewals as long as you update them at renewal so they can provide the correct cover the following year
    Originally posted by photome

    Let's imagine that you had been diagnosed with a new significant condition (say type 1 diabetes just as an example) which later caused you to be taken ill on holiday and need hospital treatment. Your insurer wouldn't pay out for that treatment if you hadn't declared the new diagnosis before leaving for your trip.
    • photome
    • By photome 28th Oct 16, 8:26 PM
    • 11,996 Posts
    • 7,514 Thanks
    photome
    • #8
    • 28th Oct 16, 8:26 PM
    • #8
    • 28th Oct 16, 8:26 PM
    Let's imagine that you had been diagnosed with a new significant condition (say type 1 diabetes just as an example) which later caused you to be taken ill on holiday and need hospital treatment. Your insurer wouldn't pay out for that treatment if you hadn't declared the new diagnosis before leaving for your trip.
    Originally posted by katejo
    Are you sure?

    If it's a yearly policy and you don't have the condition at the start of the policy

    I thought the same as you ,but when I called to tell my insurance company of a new treatment they didn't want to know until renewal

    Maybe I misunderstood though
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 29th Oct 16, 10:07 AM
    • 20,648 Posts
    • 52,523 Thanks
    pollypenny
    • #9
    • 29th Oct 16, 10:07 AM
    • #9
    • 29th Oct 16, 10:07 AM
    With every annual policy we've had there's been a condition that we inform them of any major change.

    That doesn't mean the flu, obviously. I'd rather be safe than sorry.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • jonesMUFCforever
    • By jonesMUFCforever 29th Oct 16, 4:56 PM
    • 23,176 Posts
    • 10,530 Thanks
    jonesMUFCforever
    Are you sure?

    If it's a yearly policy and you don't have the condition at the start of the policy

    I thought the same as you ,but when I called to tell my insurance company of a new treatment they didn't want to know until renewal

    Maybe I misunderstood though
    Originally posted by photome
    I wouldn't like to take the chance would you?
    What goes around - comes around
    give lots and you will always receive lots
    • leylandsunaddict
    • By leylandsunaddict 29th Oct 16, 6:16 PM
    • 804 Posts
    • 498 Thanks
    leylandsunaddict
    Are you sure?

    If it's a yearly policy and you don't have the condition at the start of the policy

    I thought the same as you ,but when I called to tell my insurance company of a new treatment they didn't want to know until renewal

    Maybe I misunderstood though
    Originally posted by photome
    Read your policy. I know mine explicitly states "After you have paid for this policy, you must tell us if your health changes".
    • katejo
    • By katejo 29th Oct 16, 9:03 PM
    • 2,810 Posts
    • 1,066 Thanks
    katejo
    Are you sure?

    If it's a yearly policy and you don't have the condition at the start of the policy

    I thought the same as you ,but when I called to tell my insurance company of a new treatment they didn't want to know until renewal

    Maybe I misunderstood though
    Originally posted by photome
    Yes I am sure. In 2015 I had an annual policy. In July I broke my wrist. This didn't stop me going away in September or October but i did have to declare it. I was told that I was covered for my 2 autumn trips without paying a premium but would have to pay a bit more if i booked another trip before the policy expired (even though my wrist was full healed by then).
    • Fromply
    • By Fromply 1st Nov 16, 2:44 PM
    • 50 Posts
    • 23 Thanks
    Fromply
    I received the same letter from Staysure and duly complied. I am 72 and my policy because of pre existing conditions cost £950 for the year.

    I notified them of changes to my health and medications - mostly improvements. No reductions in my premium, but they charged me a £10 administration fee - I protested and they reduced it to £5. I continued to object and asked them to cancel my policy and issue a pro rata refund (which they said at the beginning of the call they could get a manager to authorise in circumstances where additional charges were not accepted). They refused and said that I could pay the admin charge and remain covered, or cancel my policy but receive no refund. In the end I paid the £5 and submitted a formal complaint to the company.

    I was called back about the complaint and through a 40 minute discussion it was made clear to me that in order to remain covered, I (and everyone else - it wasn't specific to me) was expected to call them after EVERY visit to the doctor, and to pay a £10 administration fee (plus whatever they hike the premium by, but of course, no reduction if my health improves and risk decreases). At my age, that makes no practical sense at all. We used the specific example of visiting the doctor to have a Flu Vaccine and I was told categorically that if I didn't notify them of this (and pay the admin fee), then my policy would be invalid if I were to make a claim.

    What I dont understand (and they couldn't get me to understand) was that I bought insurance for 1 year - if new conditions come up within that year, why do I have to firstly declare it, and secondly pay more? That's what I paid a small fortune in insurance premiums to cover - unexpected health problems!

    As it stands - I bought travel insurance for a year - declared everything I could possible think of, which isn't easy and I'm sure I got some non important things wrong (I'm not a doctor and its not easy understanding, remembering and explaining conditions) - paid to update them, but have zero confidence that in the case of a claim being required they wouldn't find an unreasonable technicality to avoid paying. There is no way on earth I intend to renew my policy with them (or come to that anyone else - I'm sure all the insurance companies are the same). Quite simply I don't believe insurance works any more!
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 1st Nov 16, 5:50 PM
    • 1,722 Posts
    • 1,120 Thanks
    EssexExile
    ...but have zero confidence that in the case of a claim being required they wouldn't find an unreasonable technicality to avoid paying.
    Originally posted by Fromply
    I was worried last year as I had to cancel due to gallbladder problems & I knew I had gallstones & hadn't told them. The doctor didn't help by referring to them on his bit of the claim form! I had my defence all sorted out in my head ready for the argument, then they went & paid the claim in full without a word. That was Columbus Direct.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • Katiehound
    • By Katiehound 4th Nov 16, 3:40 PM
    • 3,174 Posts
    • 34,719 Thanks
    Katiehound
    I was very impressed with Explorer travel insurance. I had to make a claim -due to replacement knee- which came out of the blue (consultant knocked the wind out of my sails!)
    OK- loads of paperwork for the claim but their claims agent approved it within 5 days of getting the info. I was well impressed. Think they paid up in about a week- 2 x cancelled cruises.
    That was an annual policy with pre existing conditions.
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!

    If you found my posting helpful please hit the "Thanks" button!
    Thank You
    • leylandsunaddict
    • By leylandsunaddict 4th Nov 16, 4:43 PM
    • 804 Posts
    • 498 Thanks
    leylandsunaddict
    I received the same letter from Staysure and duly complied. I am 72 and my policy because of pre existing conditions cost £950 for the year.

    I notified them of changes to my health and medications - mostly improvements. No reductions in my premium, but they charged me a £10 administration fee - I protested and they reduced it to £5. I continued to object and asked them to cancel my policy and issue a pro rata refund (which they said at the beginning of the call they could get a manager to authorise in circumstances where additional charges were not accepted). They refused and said that I could pay the admin charge and remain covered, or cancel my policy but receive no refund. In the end I paid the £5 and submitted a formal complaint to the company.

    I was called back about the complaint and through a 40 minute discussion it was made clear to me that in order to remain covered, I (and everyone else - it wasn't specific to me) was expected to call them after EVERY visit to the doctor, and to pay a £10 administration fee (plus whatever they hike the premium by, but of course, no reduction if my health improves and risk decreases). At my age, that makes no practical sense at all. We used the specific example of visiting the doctor to have a Flu Vaccine and I was told categorically that if I didn't notify them of this (and pay the admin fee), then my policy would be invalid if I were to make a claim.

    What I dont understand (and they couldn't get me to understand) was that I bought insurance for 1 year - if new conditions come up within that year, why do I have to firstly declare it, and secondly pay more? That's what I paid a small fortune in insurance premiums to cover - unexpected health problems!

    As it stands - I bought travel insurance for a year - declared everything I could possible think of, which isn't easy and I'm sure I got some non important things wrong (I'm not a doctor and its not easy understanding, remembering and explaining conditions) - paid to update them, but have zero confidence that in the case of a claim being required they wouldn't find an unreasonable technicality to avoid paying. There is no way on earth I intend to renew my policy with them (or come to that anyone else - I'm sure all the insurance companies are the same). Quite simply I don't believe insurance works any more!
    Originally posted by Fromply
    You need to find a decent insurance company if they're insisting that you notify of every visit to the GP (which I seriously doubt that's what they meant) and charge admin fees. A flu jab is not a change in health either. Neither necessarily is a visit to the GP.
    • katejo
    • By katejo 5th Nov 16, 12:17 PM
    • 2,810 Posts
    • 1,066 Thanks
    katejo
    I was very impressed with Explorer travel insurance. I had to make a claim -due to replacement knee- which came out of the blue (consultant knocked the wind out of my sails!)
    OK- loads of paperwork for the claim but their claims agent approved it within 5 days of getting the info. I was well impressed. Think they paid up in about a week- 2 x cancelled cruises.
    That was an annual policy with pre existing conditions.
    Originally posted by Katiehound
    Interesting. You must have had previous symptoms such as pain in your knee. Had you declared them to the insurer?
    • katejo
    • By katejo 5th Nov 16, 12:25 PM
    • 2,810 Posts
    • 1,066 Thanks
    katejo
    I received the same letter from Staysure and duly complied. I am 72 and my policy because of pre existing conditions cost £950 for the year.

    I notified them of changes to my health and medications - mostly improvements. No reductions in my premium, but they charged me a £10 administration fee - I protested and they reduced it to £5. I continued to object and asked them to cancel my policy and issue a pro rata refund (which they said at the beginning of the call they could get a manager to authorise in circumstances where additional charges were not accepted). They refused and said that I could pay the admin charge and remain covered, or cancel my policy but receive no refund. In the end I paid the £5 and submitted a formal complaint to the company.

    I was called back about the complaint and through a 40 minute discussion it was made clear to me that in order to remain covered, I (and everyone else - it wasn't specific to me) was expected to call them after EVERY visit to the doctor, and to pay a £10 administration fee (plus whatever they hike the premium by, but of course, no reduction if my health improves and risk decreases). At my age, that makes no practical sense at all. We used the specific example of visiting the doctor to have a Flu Vaccine and I was told categorically that if I didn't notify them of this (and pay the admin fee), then my policy would be invalid if I were to make a claim.

    What I dont understand (and they couldn't get me to understand) was that I bought insurance for 1 year - if new conditions come up within that year, why do I have to firstly declare it, and secondly pay more? That's what I paid a small fortune in insurance premiums to cover - unexpected health problems!

    As it stands - I bought travel insurance for a year - declared everything I could possible think of, which isn't easy and I'm sure I got some non important things wrong (I'm not a doctor and its not easy understanding, remembering and explaining conditions) - paid to update them, but have zero confidence that in the case of a claim being required they wouldn't find an unreasonable technicality to avoid paying. There is no way on earth I intend to renew my policy with them (or come to that anyone else - I'm sure all the insurance companies are the same). Quite simply I don't believe insurance works any more!
    Originally posted by Fromply
    Have a look at the questions asked by Insure & Go. They are pretty specific about what you have to declare.
    • Katiehound
    • By Katiehound 5th Nov 16, 6:17 PM
    • 3,174 Posts
    • 34,719 Thanks
    Katiehound
    Interesting. You must have had previous symptoms such as pain in your knee. Had you declared them to the insurer?
    Originally posted by katejo
    One of the medical conditions declared was arthritis as it had been diagnosed 8 years earlier from an X ray.
    However I did not have drugs, patches, resurfaced joints, walking aids etc- all on the health questionnaire. ...... and yes , of course I had pain! but I struggled on.
    'Good' knee started playing up so I asked for an X ray- but for both knees. Then referred to consultant- cancelled holidays as soon as I heard what he said- and told insurers what had happened.
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!

    If you found my posting helpful please hit the "Thanks" button!
    Thank You
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