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  • FIRST POST
    • gsh5112
    • By gsh5112 11th Oct 16, 4:53 PM
    • 3Posts
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    gsh5112
    Compulsary uniform. Is this right?
    • #1
    • 11th Oct 16, 4:53 PM
    Compulsary uniform. Is this right? 11th Oct 16 at 4:53 PM
    Hi
    A little advice please.


    My OH works part-time for NEXT and twice a year they MUST buy the new seasons clothes, including shoes, to wear at work. The prices are subsidised but the fact that it is obligatory seems unfair.


    So, my questions would be; Should she have to spend up to £100 twice per year on clothes on her 'uniform'? In effect they are insisting that money from her wage is spent in store (giving with one hand and taking back with the other springs to mind) thus reducing her salary. Secondly, because she is part-time she does not earn enough to pay tax and therefore not eligible to any tax-relief on it being laundered. Surely this is a double whammy of unavoidable expense.


    I appreciate the clothes are not branded, she can wear them outside work (if they sold a style she would choose to wear), the company do not want to advertise other brands but it is the enforcement which is unreasonable. If they want staff to walk around as clothes horses they should provide them for free.


    Thanks in advance
Page 1
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 11th Oct 16, 5:03 PM
    • 5,718 Posts
    • 4,254 Thanks
    ohreally
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:03 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:03 PM
    If they want staff to walk around as clothes horses they should provide them for free.
    Originally posted by gsh5112
    This.

    Perhaps this is an issue which could be collectively organised around with the help of a union.

    https://www.usdaw.org.uk/Join-Us (others are available).
    Imagination is a mental faculty that serves as a coping mechanism for those who can't or won't accept reality - unicorns and dragons and wives who don't nag, are all figments of the "imagination".

    Give a man a gun and he can rob a bank. Give a man a bank and he can rob the world.
    • Guest101
    • By Guest101 11th Oct 16, 5:03 PM
    • 11,958 Posts
    • 11,408 Thanks
    Guest101
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:03 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:03 PM
    As far as I'm aware this practice is legal.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 11th Oct 16, 5:07 PM
    • 2,626 Posts
    • 2,521 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:07 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:07 PM
    Was she made aware of the requirement before she accepted the job? If not, is it in her contract of employment. If the answer to either is 'Yes' I doubt she has much of an argument against its implementation.
    • pmlindyloo
    • By pmlindyloo 11th Oct 16, 5:08 PM
    • 9,954 Posts
    • 11,718 Thanks
    pmlindyloo
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:08 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:08 PM
    Hi
    A little advice please.


    My OH works part-time for NEXT and twice a year they MUST buy the new seasons clothes, including shoes, to wear at work. The prices are subsidised but the fact that it is obligatory seems unfair.


    So, my questions would be; Should she have to spend up to £100 twice per year on clothes on her 'uniform'? In effect they are insisting that money from her wage is spent in store (giving with one hand and taking back with the other springs to mind) thus reducing her salary. Secondly, because she is part-time she does not earn enough to pay tax and therefore not eligible to any tax-relief on it being laundered. Surely this is a double whammy of unavoidable expense.


    I appreciate the clothes are not branded, she can wear them outside work (if they sold a style she would choose to wear), the company do not want to advertise other brands but it is the enforcement which is unreasonable. If they want staff to walk around as clothes horses they should provide them for free.


    Thanks in advance
    Originally posted by gsh5112
    I agree that there is nothing in legislation to prevent this practice EXCEPT if this is done in such a way that the money is deducted from the pay slip and that would mean that the employee was being paid less than NMW then that would be a 'no no'.

    http://realbusiness.co.uk/hr-and-management/2015/10/23/monsoons-strict-dress-code-the-reason-behind-staff-not-being-paid-minimum-wage/
    • nannytone
    • By nannytone 11th Oct 16, 5:08 PM
    • 11,528 Posts
    • 16,771 Thanks
    nannytone
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:08 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:08 PM
    if it is her contract, then she has no complaint.

    as the clothes are not 'branded' then even if she paid tax, she wouldn't get tax relief on laundering expenses.

    the fact that she chooses not to wear them outside of work is exactly that ... her choice.
    • NYM
    • By NYM 11th Oct 16, 5:11 PM
    • 2,876 Posts
    • 4,870 Thanks
    NYM
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:11 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 16, 5:11 PM
    Presumably, she'd need to buy something to wear anyhow?

    With the staff discount she's certainly not paying the full cost as she'd have to from any other store.
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 11th Oct 16, 7:29 PM
    • 5,789 Posts
    • 3,423 Thanks
    teddysmum
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 16, 7:29 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 16, 7:29 PM
    Everyone, well nearly everyone, launders their clothing. I believe that those jobs which have allowances are dirty, messy or those , like nursing, where it's health and safety precaution.
    • nannytone
    • By nannytone 11th Oct 16, 7:36 PM
    • 11,528 Posts
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    nannytone
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 7:36 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 7:36 PM
    Everyone, well nearly everyone, launders their clothing. I believe that those jobs which have allowances are dirty, messy or those , like nursing, where it's health and safety precaution.
    Originally posted by teddysmum
    there are different amounts, for different types of work.
    but you are allowed to claim for any work uniform, that carries an unremovable company name/logo, because this clothing is only for work and not to be worn on other occasions.

    if you do a dirty job but wear your own clothes, there is no laundry allowance
    • Darksparkle
    • By Darksparkle 11th Oct 16, 8:08 PM
    • 3,382 Posts
    • 2,103 Thanks
    Darksparkle
    I thought everyone would know this about next.

    However what does it have to do with benefits?
    • kingfisherblue
    • By kingfisherblue 11th Oct 16, 10:07 PM
    • 6,804 Posts
    • 14,620 Thanks
    kingfisherblue
    As a Saturday girl in Dorothy Perkins, in 1986, I had to buy clothing from their range to wear for work. We received a 20% discount. At £1.17 an hour, and with only a six hour shift, it was a fair amount from my wage. Luckily, I liked the clothes that I chose and wore them outside work. I also found a Saturday job that I enjoyed more, and that had an eight hour shift, after just three months.

    Clothes shops have had this practice for many years. It's nothing new.
    • kazzah
    • By kazzah 11th Oct 16, 10:49 PM
    • 363 Posts
    • 360 Thanks
    kazzah
    this is nothing new - I worked for Arcadia group in 1988 and had to wear the brand clothing - we did however get 30% discount and when my friend worked at next she got 25% discount -which is a substantial saving - your friend would need to purchase clothing for work anyway - and as she is only part time then perhaps one skirt and one pair of trousers would suffice with a couple of tops - or even less if she only has a few hours work for example they currently sell navy chinos for £10 with a 25% discount that is £7.50 - which I don't think anyone could moan at for workwear - probably cheaper than she could buy if she worked in an office and had to buy work clothes
    • TERIERI
    • By TERIERI 12th Oct 16, 9:19 AM
    • 101 Posts
    • 139 Thanks
    TERIERI
    Next employees actually get 75% discount on uniform. Every new season they are given an allowance depending on hours worked and get 75% discount on that allowance.
    Anything over that they get their normal 25% staff discount.
    • dippy3103
    • By dippy3103 12th Oct 16, 9:39 AM
    • 1,506 Posts
    • 2,319 Thanks
    dippy3103
    I frequently am required to wear a suit for work to attend court, which I am expected to but myself and launder myself. Most people have to buy and wash their own clothing.

    With a 75% discount on work clothes your GF is probably paying less for the clothes than if she brought them from Primark.
    • kazzah
    • By kazzah 12th Oct 16, 10:46 AM
    • 363 Posts
    • 360 Thanks
    kazzah
    Next employees actually get 75% discount on uniform. Every new season they are given an allowance depending on hours worked and get 75% discount on that allowance.
    Anything over that they get their normal 25% staff discount.
    Originally posted by TERIERI
    wow - that is a fabulous discount- I would be delighted to get that !
    • MEM62
    • By MEM62 13th Oct 16, 11:58 AM
    • 953 Posts
    • 623 Thanks
    MEM62
    If it is a condition of employment and was made clear at the outset then it is not unfair or unreasonable. You OH has the choice of looking at the terms and conditions of her employment deciding whether she deems them to be acceptable or not. If they are not acceptable to her then she can seek employment elsewhere.
    • ERICS MUM
    • By ERICS MUM 13th Oct 16, 12:09 PM
    • 3,161 Posts
    • 5,934 Thanks
    ERICS MUM
    Most jobs have a dress code, not necessarily a uniform but nevertheless clothes that you would not choose to wear when not at work.

    The discount from Next sounds very generous.
    • SparkieTheCat
    • By SparkieTheCat 13th Oct 16, 6:11 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    SparkieTheCat
    Nice of NEXT to discriminate fat people who clearly could not buy there clothes to wear for work... you know a size 24+
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 13th Oct 16, 7:10 PM
    • 5,789 Posts
    • 3,423 Thanks
    teddysmum
    According to tv news Next's prices are to rise, so that probably means fewer sales and possibly less staff, making a rant about cheap clothing as a 'uniform' quite trivial.
    • nannytone
    • By nannytone 13th Oct 16, 7:27 PM
    • 11,528 Posts
    • 16,771 Thanks
    nannytone
    Nice of NEXT to discriminate fat people who clearly could not buy there clothes to wear for work... you know a size 24+
    Originally posted by SparkieTheCat
    26 +. Next do a size 24.

    the only go down to a size 6 as well, so do you consider that they discriminate against smaller people too?

    if you are over a size 24 you really should be taking steps to lose weight even if only for health reasons.

    when i was at school i had a saturday job where we had to wear uniforms provided by the company. their biggest size was a 14.
    i consider that to be unreasonable, but a size 24 SHOULD cater for the vast majority of people
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