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    • cashmonger
    • By cashmonger 11th Oct 16, 12:25 PM
    • 145Posts
    • 27Thanks
    cashmonger
    How to be warm in bed without very heavy duvets?
    • #1
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:25 PM
    How to be warm in bed without very heavy duvets? 11th Oct 16 at 12:25 PM
    I've had a hyperextended knee for maybe more than a year but it has been worse this year. I had no idea what it was but I have guessed through reading that is what it is.

    It was made worse by playing sport but I remember in hindsight around winter last year how when my double heavy duvets were on I would wake up on my back with my leg in real pain feeling like it had been pushed backwards. I think this is what may have initially caused it and now it is even worse from sport so I don't want to use those heavy duvets again. I would use 1, 20 tog duvet and another 15 tog both stuffed into the duvet cover. It saw me well through the winter but it was very heavy on the body which I can't have now since I don't want to make my knee worse.

    It is getting colder by the day so I need a solution quickly. Any ideas for keeping warm without having to put extra load on the body? Of course I don't want to waste money on heating being an avid money saver.

    I am thinking an alternative would be to wear lots of extra layers in bed but they would have to be very baggy. I tried one pair of trousers last night and it was restrictive so I have to buy some more for the task I think.

    Any other suggestions?
Page 1
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 11th Oct 16, 12:30 PM
    • 9,495 Posts
    • 21,111 Thanks
    suki1964
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:30 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:30 PM
    You can buy higher tog duvets which are lightweight

    Also invest in flannel bedding, so much warmer just even to get into bed

    Something else you might want to try is putting the heavy duvet on the mattress, give you something to snuggle into

    I have a 4 tog, flannel sheets and have the window open at night. I'm warm and toasty in bed
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • HiToAll
    • By HiToAll 11th Oct 16, 12:33 PM
    • 833 Posts
    • 1,227 Thanks
    HiToAll
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:33 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:33 PM
    Do the naughty all night!
    • Jackieboy
    • By Jackieboy 11th Oct 16, 12:34 PM
    • 251 Posts
    • 396 Thanks
    Jackieboy
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:34 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:34 PM
    Down/feather or down filled duvets aren't heavy, whatever tog you use. You could also consider an electric blanket instead (or as well as) of a duvet.
    • phil24_7
    • By phil24_7 11th Oct 16, 12:35 PM
    • 1,271 Posts
    • 571 Thanks
    phil24_7
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:35 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:35 PM
    A duvet to lay on helps keep warmth in, as do mattress protectors.

    I personally use an electric blanket to either take the chill out or for an hour when I go to sleep. I can then use it again for and hour should I wake in the night.
    • JP08
    • By JP08 11th Oct 16, 12:36 PM
    • 660 Posts
    • 675 Thanks
    JP08
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:36 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:36 PM
    Take the advice from David Hallamshire's 'The Bedsit Survival Manual', from the section on heating in a bedsit ?

    "Get a fat lover in October, they tend to get snapped up by November"

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bedsit-Survival-Manual-David-Hallamshire/dp/085223760X
    • TheShape
    • By TheShape 11th Oct 16, 12:54 PM
    • 426 Posts
    • 211 Thanks
    TheShape
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:54 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 16, 12:54 PM
    A 20 tog AND a 15 tog . I'd spontaneously combust. Is your bedroom particularly cold? Is there a way to keep the room itself warmer, draught-proofing, heavier curtains etc?
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 11th Oct 16, 1:07 PM
    • 6,482 Posts
    • 10,744 Thanks
    andrewf75
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 16, 1:07 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 16, 1:07 PM
    Agree with above, our thickest duvet is 8 tog and we hardly ever put it on its so warm - and we have the window open at night
    Do you have a down duvet? They really are amazingly warm
    • cashmonger
    • By cashmonger 11th Oct 16, 1:42 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    cashmonger
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 1:42 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 1:42 PM
    Hmm my flat isn't particularly cold. But I don't heat the bedroom since I work in the living room so maybe that is the difference?

    I also don't use carpets since I have an extreme dust allergy so wooden flooring which I suppose does not keep heat well.

    I will look into the other types of duvet maybe I can get better for cheaper.

    Yes I'd thought of putting one duvet on the mattress instead; perhaps the 'sandwidch' effect would suffice.
    • Fen1
    • By Fen1 11th Oct 16, 1:43 PM
    • 1,215 Posts
    • 2,534 Thanks
    Fen1
    Flannel sheets are definitely cosier than plain cotton.

    A blanket or duvet on the mattress.

    Try thermal underwear : long sleeve vests and longjohns. Rmember thermal socks to keep feet warm. Look at somewhere like Damart, or outdoor pursuits shops. The outdoor shops - especially skiing and mountaineering specialists - are great for lightweight, easy wearing, thermal layers.

    Flannel pyjamas rather than plain cotton over the top of your thermals.

    Is your bedroom properly insulated? The fact that you need so much bedding raises questions. We once lived in an un insulated house. I slept in three layers of clothes, huge feather duvet and blankets. The house was utter misery to live in.

    Sleep with a pillow under your knees to stop them over-straightening. Has your Physio not helped with exercises?
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 11th Oct 16, 2:28 PM
    • 1,934 Posts
    • 1,053 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    Wool mattress topper - will help keep you cool in the summer and can usually be reversed to have the fluffier side facing up to keep you warm in the winter. Combined with a suitable tog duvet and keeping your bedroom at a comfortable temperature (ours doesn't drop below 17-18C on the coldest of nights with the heating off entirely between 11PM and 7am).
    • tanith
    • By tanith 11th Oct 16, 2:32 PM
    • 7,957 Posts
    • 8,541 Thanks
    tanith
    We have an electric blanket and flannel bedding, only need the blanket on for 15 mins so its economical and sliding into a warm cosy flannel bed is just fab.
    #6 of the SKI-ers Club

    "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" Edmund Burke
    • Gers
    • By Gers 11th Oct 16, 2:35 PM
    • 4,690 Posts
    • 24,678 Thanks
    Gers
    Duvets are not heavy and certainly wouldn't be pressing down on your knee. The down / feather ones are so light and fall around the body in a way that the man made ones don't. They tend to be a sort of cage with cold gaps around the body.

    My tips-

    Wear pj bottoms with cuffs. Loose legged bottoms, I find, tend to move up the leg leaving uncovered parts of leg. This was a revelation to me and worked wonders.

    If you have a bedtime companion have separate duvets. Having one each stops the gaps and stops one big one being 'stolen' by your partner overnight. Having one each is typical on the continental mainland, even in hotels. Works so well too.

    Electric blanket for one hour before bed. Fab.

    Flannelette sheets and duvet cover. Extra fab. Never mind pillow covers, I find they made my head too hot.

    Layers - thin ones, vest, t-shirt, pj top etc.

    Hot water bottle - my elderly mum swears by hers.

    Socks on - not my favourite thing but I'm sure it works. I find that my socks end up hidden amongst the duvet as I've obviously taken them off overnight.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 11th Oct 16, 2:39 PM
    • 13,656 Posts
    • 33,133 Thanks
    elsien
    Bedding layers as well, but not stuffed into the same cover. I have a duvet and a bedspread/throw type thing which I pull on top when it's cold. It's lightweight, but it does make e reasonable difference.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 11th Oct 16, 2:43 PM
    • 5,274 Posts
    • 4,049 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    As above get a warm mattress topper. I've got a memory foam mattress which is very warm. Before this I was much colder on a standard mattress. When I go camping I use a self inflating mattress which is full of foam. Before this I tried an airbed which was freezing, both using the same sleeping bag. Try using one of your duvets underneath you although a proper mattress topper shouldn't compress as much so should be warmer.

    I use a silk duvet which is light and warm and also good for allergy sufferers but they're not cheap.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 11-10-2016 at 2:49 PM.
    Too cool for school. Also too old for school.
    • cashmonger
    • By cashmonger 11th Oct 16, 3:21 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    cashmonger
    Regarding clothing I can only wear synthetic materials such as shell as cotton material or anything similar with any kind of pile will give me a reaction.

    So I wear sports clothes which allow me to breath while also being of suitable material. Sure they are not warm but I have to layer up
    • Cisco001
    • By Cisco001 11th Oct 16, 3:46 PM
    • 2,475 Posts
    • 1,046 Thanks
    Cisco001
    Memory foam topper/ 4.5t duvet under bed sheet.

    The get microfiber filled duvet. feather down filled duvet could be warmer, but since you got allergy, it may not be suitable.

    And before you sleep soak your feet in hot water or having a quick hot shower. Then wear thermal socks
    • cashmonger
    • By cashmonger 11th Oct 16, 7:06 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    cashmonger
    Memory foam topper/ 4.5t duvet under bed sheet.

    The get microfiber filled duvet. feather down filled duvet could be warmer, but since you got allergy, it may not be suitable.

    And before you sleep soak your feet in hot water or having a quick hot shower. Then wear thermal socks
    Originally posted by Cisco001
    I use dust mite proof covers so the duvet material should not be an issue.
    • daveyjp
    • By daveyjp 11th Oct 16, 7:32 PM
    • 6,519 Posts
    • 4,872 Thanks
    daveyjp
    Wool duvet. Excellent warmth, but far less bulky than feather and down duvets. Also choose brushed cotton duvet and sheets. Far warmer.
    • cashmonger
    • By cashmonger 11th Oct 16, 8:21 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    cashmonger
    Hmm wool is very expensive and if the tog is only average (i saw one for only 10 tog which costs 60 quid on ebay) then it is a big cost for not much in regards to warmth; considering I needed nearly 40 tog to see me through in other years.
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