Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
Page 2
    • TheShape
    • By TheShape 11th Oct 16, 5:36 PM
    • 453 Posts
    • 230 Thanks
    TheShape
    Also,

    You can make withdrawals from the Account at any of our branches but you can only make payments from this Account to a current or savings account in your name with us (or in the case of a joint account, in any of your names).

    You'll want to have another Lloyds account or when it matures you'd have to go to branch and do a large withdrawal in cash.

    I imagine I'll keep my Club Lloyds only to guarantee the Monthly Saver Rate and for the cinema tickets.
    • badger09
    • By badger09 11th Oct 16, 6:31 PM
    • 4,266 Posts
    • 3,480 Thanks
    badger09
    Posted on Budgeting & Bank forum - Halifax Reward dropping to £3


    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?p=71438045#post71438045
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 11th Oct 16, 6:33 PM
    • 5,144 Posts
    • 9,070 Thanks
    bowlhead99
    Defensive assets? Such as oil majors that are borrowing to fund dividends. I'm surprised that someone of your stature is playing the game. I still laugh at those who believed LastMinute.com to be a sound investment and couldn't see the wood for the trees.
    Originally posted by Thrugelmir
    No, I wouldn't lump oil majors in with defensive, even though they have historically had good dividend payouts. Groups in the energy sector such as oilers can behave quite differently to what I think of as "defensive"and they have had a tough time with the oil price, one of the sector s that's suffered along with other types of miners (materials groups) suffering from the cyclicality of demand and changing far eastern growth prospects. I also wouldn't have dived into lastminute dotcom as a defensive either...

    However my point was, if you look at consumer defensives, particularly in the US, you can see investors have really supported the share price of those companies as part of their desperate search for yield.

    Example, Procter & Gamble, share price up 19% in last year on top of a 3% yield: PE is now over 25. In tobacco, Altria and Phillip Morris Intl are up 10-15% in same timescale paying 4% div on top, with PEs around 22. These are earnings multiples you don't see in defensive stocks when interest rates and bond yields are more "normal". And those returns are in USD, I'm not including the huge FX boost to GBP because you wouldn't have got that as a Frenchman or a German or an American.

    I have First State Global Listed Infrastructure - and have been periodically selling it down for last couple of years after "a good run" but it keeps going up! 32% YTD (some of that's a good FX boost as its holdings are only 7% UK). But 57% in 3 years, 94% in 5 years. Not bad for boring holdings of water, electric, toll roads and railways, airports, ports etc. And it's not a massively clever fund, not a huge outperformance of the global infrastructure indices really.

    But people like putting their money in companies that have the means to pay an income. And some of these people would not be in equities at all of they could get income from bonds or cash. So a lot of people are over-risked due to not perceiving there to be an alternative option.

    My comment was only a lighthearted tongue-in-cheek one really. Basically I'm happy to *already* have some of these investments that people are now prizing, rather than be in cash thinking "damn, lloyds aren't paying 4% any more, what are those S&S things all about, I hear you can get good returns according to this 5-year chart, don't know much about it bit where do I sign..."

    There will be some tears in the end.
    • Scarpacci
    • By Scarpacci 11th Oct 16, 7:00 PM
    • 939 Posts
    • 2,250 Thanks
    Scarpacci
    No, I wouldn't lump oil majors in with defensive, even though they have historically had good dividend payouts. Groups in the energy sector such as oilers can behave quite differently to what I think of as "defensive"and they have had a tough time with the oil price, one of the sector s that's suffered along with other types of miners (materials groups) suffering from the cyclicality of demand and changing far eastern growth prospects. I also wouldn't have dived into lastminute dotcom as a defensive either...

    However my point was, if you look at consumer defensives, particularly in the US, you can see investors have really supported the share price of those companies as part of their desperate search for yield.

    Example, Procter & Gamble, share price up 19% in last year on top of a 3% yield: PE is now over 25. In tobacco, Altria and Phillip Morris Intl are up 10-15% in same timescale paying 4% div on top, with PEs around 22. These are earnings multiples you don't see in defensive stocks when interest rates and bond yields are more "normal". And those returns are in USD, I'm not including the huge FX boost to GBP because you wouldn't have got that as a Frenchman or a German or an American.
    Originally posted by bowlhead99
    The fascinating part of the high valuation on U.S. defensive stocks like P&G is that the U.S. rates are seemingly, albeit slowly, normalising. U.S. interest rates are likely to go up in December. The dollar is strong and could be getting stronger (by which I mean against many other currencies, not specifically the pound).

    There was a period of time last year where those two thoughts sent down the stock prices of P&G, Johnson & Johnson, et. al. down. Now they head up in spite of it.
    This is everybody's fault but mine.
    • darkidoe
    • By darkidoe 11th Oct 16, 8:23 PM
    • 653 Posts
    • 718 Thanks
    darkidoe
    Whaaat!! Bad news for savers! On another note, what are the rates people are getting for 1 year P2P leading rates? I am only getting around 3% which isn't great for the higher risk taken either.
    Save 12K in 2016 # 8 £16 253.55/12 000 (135.45%) Achieved!
    • GingerFurball
    • By GingerFurball 11th Oct 16, 8:43 PM
    • 788 Posts
    • 774 Thanks
    GingerFurball
    If you keep less than £2k in the account it's a rate boost.
    DEBT FREE!

    Debt free by Xmas 2014: £3555.67/£4805.67 (73.99%)
    Debt free by Xmas 2015: £1250/£1250 (100.00%)
    • Rollinghome
    • By Rollinghome 11th Oct 16, 9:04 PM
    • 2,037 Posts
    • 2,185 Thanks
    Rollinghome
    Not long ago there was a lot of bemoaning of interest rates when, with a little effort, a rate well above inflation could be had.

    Bad news for savers now is that as rates fall, inflation is expected to start heading north - BoE today saying inflation of 2-3% is expected with no prospect of a rise in the base rate. I think that's called a double whammy.
    • Thrugelmir
    • By Thrugelmir 11th Oct 16, 10:43 PM
    • 51,306 Posts
    • 43,127 Thanks
    Thrugelmir

    However my point was, if you look at consumer defensives, particularly in the US, you can see investors have really supported the share price of those companies as part of their desperate search for yield.
    Originally posted by bowlhead99
    Interestingly 20% of all purchases of US major shares in 2015 were Company buybacks. Many financed by debt. As US Corporations keep the cash off shore to avoid the penal 35% tax rate. The water is far more muddy than it may appear. Tesco's illustrated how even a straight forward business resorted to financial engineering to massage it's accounts. Can only be one of many globally. Like you I've seen enough in my lifetime to take a cynical view of the business world. The music is reaching a crescendo. With far too much optimism. A sure sign that the bull market has only one way to go.
    Last edited by Thrugelmir; 11-10-2016 at 10:45 PM.
    “A man is rich who lives upon what he has. A man is poor who lives upon what is coming. A prudent man lives within his income, and saves against ‘a rainy day’.”
    • joe134
    • By joe134 12th Oct 16, 8:26 AM
    • 2,929 Posts
    • 383 Thanks
    joe134
    TSB also now;and only on £1500.

    What happens about the LLoyds fee, if you just withdraw all cash, and stop DD's? and leave A/c open??

    Fresh blow to savers as banks slash interest rates: Lloyds, TSB and Halifax unveil plans to cut figure on popular current accounts
    UK's high street giants unveiled plans to cut headline rates on accounts
    Lloyds said it will cut 4pc top rate on popular Club Lloyds account to 2pc
    And TSB said it would reduce interest to 3 pc from the start of next year
    By RUTH LYTH
    • ctdctd
    • By ctdctd 12th Oct 16, 8:44 AM
    • 728 Posts
    • 524 Thanks
    ctdctd
    TSB also now;and only on £1500.

    Fresh blow to savers as banks slash interest rates: Lloyds, TSB and Halifax unveil plans to cut figure on popular current accounts
    UK's high street giants unveiled plans to cut headline rates on accounts
    Lloyds said it will cut 4pc top rate on popular Club Lloyds account to 2pc
    And TSB said it would reduce interest to 3 pc from the start of next year
    By RUTH LYTH
    Originally posted by joe134
    Link for Joe134's DM quote.
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3833518/Fresh-blow-savers-banks-slash-rates-Lloyds-TSB-Halifax-unveil-plans-cut-figure-popular-current-accounts.html
    Do Money Saving sites make you buy more bargains - and spend more money?
    • apt
    • By apt 12th Oct 16, 8:48 AM
    • 3,041 Posts
    • 1,705 Thanks
    apt
    Club Lloyds fee will be £3 per month if you do not have 2 DDs or pay in £1500.
    • joe134
    • By joe134 12th Oct 16, 10:08 AM
    • 2,929 Posts
    • 383 Thanks
    joe134
    Club Lloyds fee will be £3 per month if you do not have 2 DDs or pay in £1500.
    Originally posted by apt
    So, The a/c has to be closed, by letter,or phone, or the fee is still due, if you stop dd's and the £1500. unlike their other accounts, which you can, leave open, without dd's and monthly payment, and empty, like Vantage, which I have 2, empty?
    • Ed-1
    • By Ed-1 12th Oct 16, 10:15 AM
    • 1,498 Posts
    • 810 Thanks
    Ed-1
    So, The a/c has to be closed, by letter,or phone, or the fee is still due, if you stop dd's and the £1500. unlike their other accounts, which you can, leave open, without dd's and monthly payment, and empty, like Vantage, which I have 2, empty?
    Originally posted by joe134
    You only need to pay in £1500 to avoid the fee. The DDs are relevant to interest.
    • joe134
    • By joe134 12th Oct 16, 10:27 AM
    • 2,929 Posts
    • 383 Thanks
    joe134
    You only need to pay in £1500 to avoid the fee. The DDs are relevant to interest.
    Originally posted by Ed-1
    Hi Ed-1.
    The point I am trying to make is, what if , as I will probably, not want the A/c anymore,after the rate drop, do I,et al, have to write to close it, because stopping the £1500, and DD,s and money, still leaves the A/c open, and club fee liable, on an empty a/c?
    Last edited by joe134; 12-10-2016 at 10:29 AM.
    • jeepjunkie
    • By jeepjunkie 12th Oct 16, 10:27 AM
    • 1,274 Posts
    • 1,263 Thanks
    jeepjunkie
    Unsurprising but disappointing, thanks for the heads up OP. Had a good run there at least. More P2P beckons, as well as learning about the stockmarket.
    Originally posted by fun4everyone

    Investing in debt is not the greatest idea right now...
    • Ed-1
    • By Ed-1 12th Oct 16, 10:32 AM
    • 1,498 Posts
    • 810 Thanks
    Ed-1
    Hi Ed-1.
    The point I am trying to make is, what if , as I will probably, not want the A/c anymore,after the rate drop, do I,et al, have to write to close it, because stopping the £1500, and DD,s and money, still leaves the A/c open, and club fee liable, on an empty a/c?
    Originally posted by joe134
    You don't mind giving up the lifestyle benefit then?
    • joe134
    • By joe134 12th Oct 16, 10:36 AM
    • 2,929 Posts
    • 383 Thanks
    joe134
    You don't mind giving up the lifestyle benefit then?
    Originally posted by Ed-1
    No, only give the tickets away.
    how long before that's stopped?
    Last edited by joe134; 12-10-2016 at 10:42 AM.
    • Nationwide8
    • By Nationwide8 12th Oct 16, 11:31 AM
    • 208 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    Nationwide8
    At least Lloyds have kept the rewards,I take the cinema tickets which saves" me about £50 a year.Would have walked if they had cut that as well as the interest rates.

    Also have Santander,TSB ,and Halifax accounts...just added up I will "loose" about £400 + in interest next year

    Apart from Tesco and BOS at 3% ( which will probably change ) ....shoving it all in Premium bonds and having no hassle of DDs or minimum pay ins is looking like an option.
    • Kendall80
    • By Kendall80 12th Oct 16, 12:08 PM
    • 818 Posts
    • 529 Thanks
    Kendall80

    Apart from Tesco and BOS at 3% ( which will probably change ) ....shoving it all in Premium bonds and having no hassle of DDs or minimum pay ins is looking like an option.
    Originally posted by Nationwide8

    Except rising inflation over the coming years may well erode the real terms value of your pot with the current average 'return' being 1.25%
    • fun4everyone
    • By fun4everyone 12th Oct 16, 12:23 PM
    • 343 Posts
    • 480 Thanks
    fun4everyone
    Except rising inflation over the coming years may well erode the real terms value of your pot
    Originally posted by Kendall80
    This is exactly what I am worried about. P2P has been just fine for me but definitely going to pull the trigger on s&s isa soon to work together to beat inflation.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

3,883Posts Today

6,640Users online

Martin's Twitter