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  • FIRST POST
    • Pennywise
    • By Pennywise 11th Oct 16, 9:41 AM
    • 8,165Posts
    • 14,231Thanks
    Pennywise
    When do wasps die for winter?
    • #1
    • 11th Oct 16, 9:41 AM
    When do wasps die for winter? 11th Oct 16 at 9:41 AM
    We started getting wasps in our house at the end of July - there's a nest in the loft and they're getting in the bathroom via the soil pipe conduit and into the house through gaps in the loft hatch etc.

    We asked around back then and we were told to live with it as they'd be dying out soon anyway, and people were saying it'd be cruel to get rid of them when they're here for such a short time. So, like soft fools, we didn't take any action.

    So, here we are in mid October, and they're still coming in. If we'd have known, we'd have ignored people in July and just had them poisoned. Realistically, how much longer do we have to put up with them, because if it's going to carry on, we're going to get the pest control in. We've now all been stung, my son's been stung twice. It's got beyond a joke.
Page 1
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 11th Oct 16, 9:58 AM
    • 371 Posts
    • 397 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 16, 9:58 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Oct 16, 9:58 AM
    It depends on the weather - a nice cold snap should finish the little blighters off. Can't come soon enough for me, either - I was badly stung a couple of weeks ago any my foot came up like a football!

    We had a nest in the shed this year, but I spotted it when it was just still golf-ball sized and got rid of it myself. Wouldn't have been able to use the shed at all if I hadn't.
    • JP08
    • By JP08 11th Oct 16, 10:00 AM
    • 660 Posts
    • 675 Thanks
    JP08
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 16, 10:00 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 16, 10:00 AM
    The ones in next doors' eaves "died for winter" this weekend just gone, courtesy of me being neighbourly and a few cans of wasp nest destroyer from B&Q. Quite good stuff, can be sprayed from a safe distance (2-3 metres), makes a good coating foam and they drop dead on contact.

    In your position, with a kid, I'd have sprayed the thing back in July. Anyone who'd have said I was being cruel would have been given the offer of taking them and giving them a home if they wanted to collect them ...
    • JP08
    • By JP08 11th Oct 16, 10:01 AM
    • 660 Posts
    • 675 Thanks
    JP08
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 16, 10:01 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 16, 10:01 AM
    As an aside - do wasps nesting in a nice warm sheltered attic actually die off at all ?
    • Ralph-y
    • By Ralph-y 11th Oct 16, 10:20 AM
    • 2,241 Posts
    • 2,724 Thanks
    Ralph-y
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 16, 10:20 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 16, 10:20 AM
    Most wasps die in the winter due to starvation, not the cold, as was previously thought. Some can survive if food can be found outside the nest.

    • In the fall, most worker wasps die. The workers are male wasps, and before they die, they impregnate the queens. The queens then look for a warm place to stay through the winter. Cold winters are good for queens because warm winters bring them out of hibernation early, when there is not enough food available outside of the hive. In the spring, the queens leave to build nests, where they lay eggs to make new colonies.
    • Ralph
    • Biggles
    • By Biggles 11th Oct 16, 10:25 AM
    • 6,960 Posts
    • 4,402 Thanks
    Biggles
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 16, 10:25 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Oct 16, 10:25 AM
    As an aside - do wasps nesting in a nice warm sheltered attic actually die off at all ?
    Originally posted by JP08
    Mine always do; they just use the nest once and maybe there's another nest, in a different place, a few years later.
    • Skibunny40
    • By Skibunny40 11th Oct 16, 10:35 AM
    • 52 Posts
    • 28 Thanks
    Skibunny40
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 16, 10:35 AM
    • #7
    • 11th Oct 16, 10:35 AM
    They should die off soon but just in case it might well be worth spending £1 at the local pound shop on a wasp trap ( hopefully they'll still have them).

    We had two wasps nests this summer and I was highly sceptical that a cheap wasp trap would work - but it did,on both nests, brilliantly!
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 11th Oct 16, 1:01 PM
    • 877 Posts
    • 822 Thanks
    Grenage
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 16, 1:01 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Oct 16, 1:01 PM
    The wasp nest in my garden is still going strong; we don't bother each other. I believe it wlil be a while yet before they die out.
    • Head The Ball
    • By Head The Ball 11th Oct 16, 1:41 PM
    • 1,794 Posts
    • 3,822 Thanks
    Head The Ball
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 1:41 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 1:41 PM
    We started getting wasps in our house at the end of July - there's a nest in the loft and they're getting in the bathroom via the soil pipe conduit and into the house through gaps in the loft hatch etc..
    Originally posted by Pennywise
    Can you block up these gaps?

    If you don't you are likely to have the same problem next year.

    Those gaps may also leak expensive heat in winter.

    Few people like wasps or welcome them in their homes but they are an important part of our ecosystem. They help to control the numbers of other insects.
    Last edited by Head The Ball; 11-10-2016 at 1:43 PM.
    When I was growing up plastic surgery was a bit of a taboo subject. These days if you mention botox no one raises an eyebrow.
    • Chanes
    • By Chanes 11th Oct 16, 5:13 PM
    • 603 Posts
    • 344 Thanks
    Chanes
    Our wasp nest has died off now. I left them alone and they left me alone, it seems wrong to kill them off if they are not causing a problem.
    • red_imps_2003
    • By red_imps_2003 13th Oct 16, 5:07 PM
    • 115 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    red_imps_2003
    Can you block up these gaps?

    If you don't you are likely to have the same problem next year.

    Those gaps may also leak expensive heat in winter.

    Few people like wasps or welcome them in their homes but they are an important part of our ecosystem. They help to control the numbers of other insects.
    Originally posted by Head The Ball
    I have often wondered if the little bar stewards actually had any point.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Oct 16, 12:57 AM
    • 20,800 Posts
    • 83,707 Thanks
    Davesnave
    I have often wondered if the little bar stewards actually had any point.
    Originally posted by red_imps_2003
    Yes, they have a place in the world and a job to do, but it doesn't necessarily impress humans, even though they are relatively recent arrivals in the ecosystem and generally far more destructive.

    There are different species, so behaviour varies, but usually aggression is the result of being drunk on rotting fruit, or getting dozy and disorientated as the autumn and colder nights arrive.

    It's not in a wasp's best interests to draw attention to the nest, so they typically keep a low profile within about 5m of it, unless it's disturbed, or until one of the situations above arises.
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • Nicki23
    • By Nicki23 12th Nov 16, 4:09 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Nicki23
    Hi, looking for a bit of advice. I notice a lot of wasps flying around my bedroom window in August, which I thought was late in summer for a nest. Judging how many there were, there must have been one either in the guttering or loft. As it was late summer, I left it thinking it would die off soon. However today in mid November I still see a few flying around the bedroom window, does that mean they are in the loft? I've only had a couple in the house, but I want to go in the loft soon and we have had two bad frosts in the past week, so I had assumed if there were in the guttering that would of killed them. How long can they survive in the loft? Thanks in advance.
    • Chanes
    • By Chanes 12th Nov 16, 6:07 PM
    • 603 Posts
    • 344 Thanks
    Chanes
    Hi, looking for a bit of advice. I notice a lot of wasps flying around my bedroom window in August, which I thought was late in summer for a nest. Judging how many there were, there must have been one either in the guttering or loft. As it was late summer, I left it thinking it would die off soon. However today in mid November I still see a few flying around the bedroom window, does that mean they are in the loft? I've only had a couple in the house, but I want to go in the loft soon and we have had two bad frosts in the past week, so I had assumed if there were in the guttering that would of killed them. How long can they survive in the loft? Thanks in advance.
    Originally posted by Nicki23
    They should die off soon, no food and that's it. The nest we had was in my roof eaves; they didn't trouble me in the loft, in fact, I can't remember seeing any on the odd time I popped up there. But we did see them outside that bedroom window.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Nov 16, 8:29 PM
    • 20,800 Posts
    • 83,707 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Went to see my wasps today, living in an old rabbit burrow away from the house. They were all still hard at it, one landing and one taking-off every second, so there is still plenty of food about for the workers.

    Meanwhile I'm finding a few queens in and around the house trying to hole-up for winter. They seem to know what's about to happen, but the proletariat are still blissfully unaware, thanks to our increasingly screwed-up seasons....
    'Only the mediocre are always at their best.' Jean Giraudoux
    • Marktheshark
    • By Marktheshark 12th Nov 16, 8:38 PM
    • 5,317 Posts
    • 6,669 Thanks
    Marktheshark
    Wasps build nest from wood, they chew it up to make paper.
    The nearest wood, the damage they can do to roof support beams and floor joists can cost tens of thousands of pounds to repair .

    The old wives tale they wont do any harm.
    LOL...
    Brexit will become whatever they invent it to be.
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 12th Nov 16, 9:28 PM
    • 11,453 Posts
    • 15,327 Thanks
    Gloomendoom
    Wasps build nest from wood, they chew it up to make paper.
    The nearest wood, the damage they can do to roof support beams and floor joists can cost tens of thousands of pounds to repair .

    The old wives tale they wont do any harm.
    LOL...
    Originally posted by Marktheshark
    Have you any examples of common wasp damage costing tens of thousands of pounds to repair?
    Advice; it rhymes with mice. Advise; it rhymes with wise.
    • Marktheshark
    • By Marktheshark 12th Nov 16, 9:31 PM
    • 5,317 Posts
    • 6,669 Thanks
    Marktheshark
    Have you any examples of common wasp damage costing tens of thousands of pounds to repair?
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    www.google.co.uk
    Brexit will become whatever they invent it to be.
    • juno
    • By juno 12th Nov 16, 9:36 PM
    • 6,387 Posts
    • 9,051 Thanks
    juno
    I keep finding dead wasps in my kitchen. I have no idea how they get there, but I had 3 on Thursday.
    Sealed pot challenge #377
    Target £125 - 2009 total £117.57
    2010 total £151.95


    Murphy's No More Pies Club #209
    • Chanes
    • By Chanes 13th Nov 16, 1:23 AM
    • 603 Posts
    • 344 Thanks
    Chanes
    Wasps build nest from wood, they chew it up to make paper.
    The nearest wood, the damage they can do to roof support beams and floor joists can cost tens of thousands of pounds to repair .

    The old wives tale they wont do any harm.
    LOL...
    Originally posted by Marktheshark
    I google it but couldn't find any reports of extensive damage costing tens of thousands of pounds by the 'garden' yellow wasps in this country?
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