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  • FIRST POST
    • Andy Hamilton
    • By Andy Hamilton 10th Oct 16, 8:32 PM
    • 648Posts
    • 576Thanks
    Andy Hamilton
    Condensation problems Positive input ventilation help please.
    • #1
    • 10th Oct 16, 8:32 PM
    Condensation problems Positive input ventilation help please. 10th Oct 16 at 8:32 PM
    We have a 4 bedroom detached house which is built as an "upside down design". Imagine a bungalow from one side and large windows down stairs.
    The room which borders the hill is 23ft long and has been tested fine for damp (has cavity walls filled a few years ago) and has a very small window.
    As the temperatures are dropping we have discovered that the house suffers from condensation.
    By design the bedrooms are much cooler (around 3 degrees lower in winter and around 8 degrees in the summer).
    Will struggle with ventilation (my wife like hermetically sealed from the outside), the bathroom has no option for extraction but 2 good sized windows which we open.

    Has anyone used a PIV system in this sort of house?
    It would be nice to circulate some of the warmth from the top of the stairs and to put a hold on the condensation before we start getting repair bills from neglect.

    Any advice appreciated
    Lets get this straight. Say my house is worth £100K, it drops £20K and I complain but I should not complain when I actually pay £200K via a mortgage:rolleyes:
Page 1
    • coffeehound
    • By coffeehound 10th Oct 16, 8:40 PM
    • 433 Posts
    • 683 Thanks
    coffeehound
    • #2
    • 10th Oct 16, 8:40 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Oct 16, 8:40 PM
    Where do you think the humidity is coming from? If it is coming from things like cooking, laundry, dishwasher, and yes showering/bathing then it might be best to address those sources first.
    • Andy Hamilton
    • By Andy Hamilton 11th Oct 16, 11:17 AM
    • 648 Posts
    • 576 Thanks
    Andy Hamilton
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 16, 11:17 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Oct 16, 11:17 AM
    Moisture is from showers with bathroom with no extractor (windows are opened during showering and short time afterwards) general cooking and breathing.
    Where we can reduce moisture, we have with a tumbler in a porch sealed from house and not drying clothes on radiators etc.
    The house has 3x 10ft windows which don't have trickle vents, north windows condense most but it's not like a house of damp.
    Lets get this straight. Say my house is worth £100K, it drops £20K and I complain but I should not complain when I actually pay £200K via a mortgage:rolleyes:
    • happy35
    • By happy35 11th Oct 16, 2:59 PM
    • 1,548 Posts
    • 2,820 Thanks
    happy35
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 16, 2:59 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Oct 16, 2:59 PM
    I have a normal design house and had a Nuaire Drimaster fitted a few years ago for condensation and it has been fantastic . I think there was a few models on their website so they may have something suitable, I also found them helpful when I contacted them.
    • zaax
    • By zaax 11th Oct 16, 3:10 PM
    • 1,666 Posts
    • 647 Thanks
    zaax
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 16, 3:10 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Oct 16, 3:10 PM
    Moisture is from showers with bathroom with no extractor (windows are opened during showering and short time afterwards) general cooking and breathing.
    Where we can reduce moisture, we have with a tumbler in a porch sealed from house and not drying clothes on radiators etc.
    The house has 3x 10ft windows which don't have trickle vents, north windows condense most but it's not like a house of damp.
    Originally posted by Andy Hamilton
    Humans product a lot of moisture and stopping all drafts etc. exacerbates damp problems greatly. For the shower the window it needs kept open for 12 hours or more after showering, or an fit an extractor fan.

    At the end of the day a portable dehumidifier will be needed.
    Last edited by zaax; 11-10-2016 at 3:13 PM.
    Do you want your money back, and a bit more, search for 'money claim online' - They don't like it up 'em Captain Mainwaring
    • Andy Hamilton
    • By Andy Hamilton 12th Oct 16, 12:41 PM
    • 648 Posts
    • 576 Thanks
    Andy Hamilton
    • #6
    • 12th Oct 16, 12:41 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Oct 16, 12:41 PM
    I can't get extraction to the bathroom by design. I think I will try the bursitis system.
    Lets get this straight. Say my house is worth £100K, it drops £20K and I complain but I should not complain when I actually pay £200K via a mortgage:rolleyes:
    • casper_g
    • By casper_g 12th Oct 16, 4:07 PM
    • 944 Posts
    • 824 Thanks
    casper_g
    • #7
    • 12th Oct 16, 4:07 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Oct 16, 4:07 PM
    I'm struggling to picture a situation where a bathroom has openable windows but it is impossible to provide mechanical extraction. Care to elaborate?
    • Andy Hamilton
    • By Andy Hamilton 19th Oct 16, 12:44 PM
    • 648 Posts
    • 576 Thanks
    Andy Hamilton
    • #8
    • 19th Oct 16, 12:44 PM
    • #8
    • 19th Oct 16, 12:44 PM
    The bathroom has a soil pipe to one side and window just above the toilet cistern height to the ceiling.
    Some of the same houses have bricked up some of the width and fitted extractors, some have the fan in the middle of the window which is not cosmetically pleaseing.
    Lets get this straight. Say my house is worth £100K, it drops £20K and I complain but I should not complain when I actually pay £200K via a mortgage:rolleyes:
    • mazziee
    • By mazziee 25th Oct 16, 6:58 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    mazziee
    • #9
    • 25th Oct 16, 6:58 PM
    • #9
    • 25th Oct 16, 6:58 PM
    I have a residential Let that suffers from condensation and have struggled to find anyone that has knowledge of fitting a Nuaire Drimaster in the Leeds area. From what I have read up, this could solve the problems with mold appearing in certain spots. The quotes I have had to supply and fit are £1000+, which is a bit steep considering the actual unit from the manufaturer is only £320. Anyone know if Nuaire have a list of recommended installers?
    • Andy Hamilton
    • By Andy Hamilton 25th Oct 16, 7:15 PM
    • 648 Posts
    • 576 Thanks
    Andy Hamilton
    I'm going to buy the device myself and either fit or get the electrician to fit it if the price is fair. They do need hard wired so it will need signed off.
    Be aware they have a new model released this month with a more astectically pleasing vent. I'm looking at the one with a boost switch and auto humidistat
    Lets get this straight. Say my house is worth £100K, it drops £20K and I complain but I should not complain when I actually pay £200K via a mortgage:rolleyes:
    • Mahsroh
    • By Mahsroh 26th Oct 16, 5:18 PM
    • 86 Posts
    • 60 Thanks
    Mahsroh
    I have a residential Let that suffers from condensation and have struggled to find anyone that has knowledge of fitting a Nuaire Drimaster in the Leeds area. From what I have read up, this could solve the problems with mold appearing in certain spots. The quotes I have had to supply and fit are £1000+, which is a bit steep considering the actual unit from the manufaturer is only £320. Anyone know if Nuaire have a list of recommended installers?
    Originally posted by mazziee
    Having a similar issue. Been quoted £1,344.00 including VAT. Hoping that a couple of more subtle, cheaper changes to the property will help the condensation issue but considering shopping around and maybe speaking to a couple of local sparkies to see if they have knowledge of installing them. Seems a lot of money. It's the purchase of the system plus small materials to install / hard wire but the unit sits in the landing ceiling and takes air from the empty roof void so hardly vast amounts of builders work involved.
    • mazziee
    • By mazziee 26th Oct 16, 8:37 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    mazziee
    I phoned Nuaire today and although they don't have recommended installers, they gave me a number of someone local ish. Although they weren't themselves able to help, they gave me a local electrician's no who has exp of fitting. Quoted £160 to fit and I've ordered the system myself. So worth calling Nuaire to see if they can do same for you
    • tacpot12
    • By tacpot12 26th Oct 16, 10:27 PM
    • 363 Posts
    • 289 Thanks
    tacpot12
    I have cured the mould problem in two properties now with a extractor fan and remote tamper-resistant humidistat. The trick is to wire the fan so that it can always be switched ON by the humidistat, and only ever switched ON by people, never OFF. The humidistats are about £60. One of the properties is tenanted and required trickle vents fitting. The trickle vents were modified to prevent them being closed. The trickle vents were £6 each off eBay and took about an hour to fit.

    Could you fit an extractor fan in the wallspace about the bathroom door so that it sucks air from the hallway and creates a positive pressure in the bathroom? Add non-closable trickle vents to the windows and you have a discreet positive pressure system to push moist air out the bathroom. Mount a remote humidistat in the area of the room that receives the least airflow and the fan will keep running until the entire bathroom is dry.

    I built a small duct system using rectangular uPVC duct (equivalent of 100mm dia) to pull damp air from where it was being created, by the shower, to where the extractor fan was fitted. The duct and accessories are very cheap from Screwfix and Toolstation. You could do the same in reverse to deliver dry air to the harder to reach areas of the bathroom.

    You need to find a solution because it will cause a rapid deterioration.
    • Mahsroh
    • By Mahsroh 27th Oct 16, 7:53 AM
    • 86 Posts
    • 60 Thanks
    Mahsroh
    I phoned Nuaire today and although they don't have recommended installers, they gave me a number of someone local ish. Although they weren't themselves able to help, they gave me a local electrician's no who has exp of fitting. Quoted £160 to fit and I've ordered the system myself. So worth calling Nuaire to see if they can do same for you
    Originally posted by mazziee
    Perfect! Thank you - i'll call them later!
    • SuzieSue
    • By SuzieSue 27th Oct 16, 12:27 PM
    • 3,313 Posts
    • 3,663 Thanks
    SuzieSue
    Envirovent have their own installers:

    http://www.envirovent.com/specifier/rapid-response/
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