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  • FIRST POST
    • Sam1903
    • By Sam1903 10th Oct 16, 4:44 PM
    • 247Posts
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    Sam1903
    wifi coldspots
    • #1
    • 10th Oct 16, 4:44 PM
    wifi coldspots 10th Oct 16 at 4:44 PM
    Well hope some one can help as after reading all the comments on a couple of threads already i am quite confused.
    I have BT HUB 5 and have perfect connection in the same room as router but my bedroom and lounge it often drops when i am on ipad. or my firestick or on demand on sky( takes forever to download a program).
    I have TP-LINK TL-PA411KIT AV500 500 Mbps Nano Powerline Adapter Starter Kit - Twin but theses appear to be for wired connections but want something that will boost the wifi signal. So one upstairs one downstairs and easy to set up.
    What would be the best cheapest easiest product to buy.
    Thanks in advance
Page 1
    • Strider590
    • By Strider590 10th Oct 16, 6:41 PM
    • 10,445 Posts
    • 5,765 Thanks
    Strider590
    • #2
    • 10th Oct 16, 6:41 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Oct 16, 6:41 PM
    Try downloading a WiFi network analyser for your device, use it to check for contending wireless networks on the same channel your using.

    Set your router to a fixed channel to avoid interference from other wireless networks. AVOID channel 11, this is by far the worst WiFi channel you can use. If possible and your router/devices support it, use the 5Ghz WiFi range from channel 34 through 48.
    Having the last word isn't the same as being right.......

    "Never confuse education with intelligence"
    • Sam1903
    • By Sam1903 10th Oct 16, 7:37 PM
    • 247 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    Sam1903
    • #3
    • 10th Oct 16, 7:37 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Oct 16, 7:37 PM
    Try downloading a WiFi network analyser for your device, use it to check for contending wireless networks on the same channel your using.

    Set your router to a fixed channel to avoid interference from other wireless networks. AVOID channel 11, this is by far the worst WiFi channel you can use. If possible and your router/devices support it, use the 5Ghz WiFi range from channel 34 through 48.
    Originally posted by Strider590
    So would this be a wifi network analyser for the bt home hub?
    Going to google how to change bt home hub5 channels
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 10th Oct 16, 7:44 PM
    • 6,802 Posts
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    esuhl
    • #4
    • 10th Oct 16, 7:44 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Oct 16, 7:44 PM
    Here's what I'd do in order of preference:

    1) Run an Ethernet cable to a socket in the upstairs room. Plug in a wireless access point.

    2) As above, but use the powerline adaptors instead of Ethernet cable.

    3) Plug in a wireless range extender somewhere between the downstairs room and the upstairs room.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 10th Oct 16, 7:50 PM
    • 6,802 Posts
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    esuhl
    • #5
    • 10th Oct 16, 7:50 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Oct 16, 7:50 PM
    So would this be a wifi network analyser for the bt home hub?
    Going to google how to change bt home hub5 channels
    Originally posted by Sam1903
    You install the network analyser on a mobile device (e.g. phone or laptop), and it will show you your signal strength, as well as all the other wireless networks around you.

    You can wander round to see where your signal is weak or strong, and also see which channels you and your neighbours are using.
    • Sam1903
    • By Sam1903 10th Oct 16, 7:51 PM
    • 247 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    Sam1903
    • #6
    • 10th Oct 16, 7:51 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Oct 16, 7:51 PM
    Here's what I'd do in order of preference:

    1) Run an Ethernet cable to a socket in the upstairs room. Plug in a wireless access point.

    2) As above, but use the powerline adaptors instead of Ethernet cable.

    3) Plug in a wireless range extender somewhere between the downstairs room and the upstairs room.
    Originally posted by esuhl
    Thanks dont want cables, i have 2 tp link adapters but its my ipad and amazon fire that i want connecting so not sure how i would do this with the powerline adapters.
    So if i am reading this correct it is the wireless range extenders i need. If this is correct can anyone suggest two that are a reasonable price and easy to install.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 10th Oct 16, 8:22 PM
    • 6,802 Posts
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    esuhl
    • #7
    • 10th Oct 16, 8:22 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Oct 16, 8:22 PM
    Thanks dont want cables, i have 2 tp link adapters but its my ipad and amazon fire that i want connecting so not sure how i would do this with the powerline adapters.
    So if i am reading this correct it is the wireless range extenders i need. If this is correct can anyone suggest two that are a reasonable price and easy to install.
    Originally posted by Sam1903
    Either that, or number 2 above (what I'd do), use the powerline adaptors and plug in a wireless access point upstairs.

    A wireless range extender will increase latency (which won't be a problem unless you're playing games online). BTW, you wouldn't need two range extenders -- just one will do.

    I'm afraid I can't recommend any brand or model in particular, though. I've never needed them myself.
    • Fightsback
    • By Fightsback 10th Oct 16, 8:34 PM
    • 2,461 Posts
    • 1,424 Thanks
    Fightsback
    • #8
    • 10th Oct 16, 8:34 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Oct 16, 8:34 PM
    Firstly try splitting the 2.4ghz and 5ghz of the BThub into 2 different SSIDs and only connect further away objects to 2.4ghz. This may or may not help the range, it depends on the devices and the surroundings.

    http://www.gizmodo.co.uk/2016/03/bt-home-hub-5-tips-tricks-settings/

    Eshul means something like this, note this is not a product endorsement but merely for illustration:

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/TL-WPA4220-Powerline-Configuration-Smartphone-UK/dp/B00DEYDF8I/ref=pd_sim_147_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=3N7MM6BCT45R 7AVW1GE8
    Last edited by Fightsback; 10-10-2016 at 8:38 PM.
    Science isn't exact, it's only confidence within limits.
    • Sam1903
    • By Sam1903 10th Oct 16, 8:40 PM
    • 247 Posts
    • 36 Thanks
    Sam1903
    • #9
    • 10th Oct 16, 8:40 PM
    • #9
    • 10th Oct 16, 8:40 PM
    Either that, or number 2 above (what I'd do), use the powerline adaptors and plug in a wireless access point upstairs.

    .
    Originally posted by esuhl
    sorry for being so dim .. so i have the powerline adaptors one connects to the router via ethernet the other plugs into a socket say upstaire, but what do i do with the ethernet from that ? what is a wireless access point?
    • Fightsback
    • By Fightsback 10th Oct 16, 8:42 PM
    • 2,461 Posts
    • 1,424 Thanks
    Fightsback
    sorry for being so dim .. so i have the powerline adaptors one connects to the router via ethernet the other plugs into a socket say upstaire, but what do i do with the ethernet from that ? what is a wireless access point?
    Originally posted by Sam1903
    Read this guide:

    http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/how-to/network-wifi/how-improve-wi-fi-in-home-wi-fi-extenders-vs-powerline-adapters-3593058/
    Science isn't exact, it's only confidence within limits.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 11th Oct 16, 11:06 AM
    • 6,802 Posts
    • 4,771 Thanks
    esuhl
    sorry for being so dim .. so i have the powerline adaptors one connects to the router via ethernet the other plugs into a socket say upstaire, but what do i do with the ethernet from that ? what is a wireless access point?
    Originally posted by Sam1903
    So the powerline adaptor gives you an Ethernet socket upstairs, right? You just need to plug in a wireless access point into that socket.

    A wireless access point simply provides wireless access to your network. Wireless devices connect to the wireless access point, which communicates with your router via the powerline adaptors.

    You have a wireless access point built into your router. By having a second wireless access point upstairs, devices can connect to whichever one gives the strongest signal.

    A wireless range extender is different. It doesn't need to be connected to Ethernet (so you won't need the powerline adaptors). It just "listens" for a weak wireless signal, then rebroadcasts it. (But this rebroadcasting causes latency -- a slight delay. So personally I'd avoid using a range extender if there were other options.)
    • JJ Egan
    • By JJ Egan 11th Oct 16, 12:19 PM
    • 8,835 Posts
    • 3,574 Thanks
    JJ Egan
    BT Hub 5 has something like SMART connect in the wifi settings turn it off can help according to multiple web posts .
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 11th Oct 16, 3:15 PM
    • 6,802 Posts
    • 4,771 Thanks
    esuhl
    I probably should have said that if you have a spare wireless router lying around, you could use the wireless access point on that, rather than buying a dedicated one.

    It's possible that you could use a spare router as a wireless range extender too, but very few routers would support that.
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