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  • FIRST POST
    • rmg1
    • By rmg1 10th Oct 16, 1:51 PM
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    rmg1
    Broadband speed comparison between premises
    • #1
    • 10th Oct 16, 1:51 PM
    Broadband speed comparison between premises 10th Oct 16 at 1:51 PM
    Hi all

    I think this is a bit of an oddity but thought I'd let some of the more experienced people have a look.
    My partner and I live next to each other and both use Sky for broadband and phone line.
    My stats (from the relevant router page) are as follows:-
    Downstream - 7611
    Margin - 6dB
    Attenuation - 46dB

    My partners stats (after Sky have made "improvements"):-
    Downstream - 3750 (ish)
    Margin - 7.1dB
    Attenuation - 57dB


    Can anyone please explain why there is such a big difference between adjoining properties and can anything be done?

    Sky have re-profiled my partners line (and I've fitted a new microfilter). They've said that's the best the line can handle but I'm not so sure.

    The only other difference is my partner has one of the new BT split faceplates (with a master socket) and I don't. My faceplate just covers a back-box in the wall and wires disappear up to the ceiling void somewhere.
    Flagellation, necrophilia and bestiality - Am I flogging a dead horse?

    Any posts are my opinion and only that. Please read at your own risk.
Page 1
    • JJ Egan
    • By JJ Egan 10th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
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    JJ Egan
    • #2
    • 10th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    How are you connected router to master socket .
    • Rubidium
    • By Rubidium 10th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    • 478 Posts
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    Rubidium
    • #3
    • 10th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Oct 16, 2:37 PM
    The obvious difference is that your partners line attenuation is much higher @ 57db and the quoted speed is about right for that level of attenuation. The extra attenuation equates to almost a 1km longer line length. It may improve slowly over time if the SNR margin drops in small increments due to their DLM if it has recently been changed.

    Even though your partner is next door, the physical line to the exchange may take a very different route to the exchange compared to yours, it may be different quality cable or have more joints along the way etc.
    • kwikbreaks
    • By kwikbreaks 10th Oct 16, 2:38 PM
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    kwikbreaks
    • #4
    • 10th Oct 16, 2:38 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Oct 16, 2:38 PM
    With that difference in attenuation I imagine the routing back to the exchange has to be different. I'd guess they are older properties and one had a phone put in many years before the other one. If that isn't the case then I've no idea how it came about.
    • rmg1
    • By rmg1 10th Oct 16, 3:11 PM
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    rmg1
    • #5
    • 10th Oct 16, 3:11 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Oct 16, 3:11 PM
    In some semblance of order:-
    JJ Egan - both are connect directly via a cable (my cable is slightly longer due to a different room layout). I bought the extended cable, my partner is using the one supplied by Sky.

    Rubidium - it sounds like the cable to my partners would have to take a seriously long route as we are in adjoining properties.

    Kwikbreaks - the properties were built way-back-when (60's I think). I'm not sure when the phone lines went in but (I'd imagine) they were installed at roughly the same time.
    Flagellation, necrophilia and bestiality - Am I flogging a dead horse?

    Any posts are my opinion and only that. Please read at your own risk.
    • securityguy
    • By securityguy 10th Oct 16, 4:19 PM
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    securityguy
    • #6
    • 10th Oct 16, 4:19 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Oct 16, 4:19 PM
    "the properties were built way-back-when (60's I think). I'm not sure when the phone lines went in but (I'd imagine) they were installed at roughly the same time."

    They would almost certainly have originally been a party line in the 1960s, and then later the properties would have had their own "lines" via a DACS line-sharing box. It's only when broadband was installed that they each required their own metallic path back to the exchange. At that point one will have had the original circuit and one a new circuit. They can be via radically different routings, number of joints and copper condition.
    • kwikbreaks
    • By kwikbreaks 10th Oct 16, 4:23 PM
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    kwikbreaks
    • #7
    • 10th Oct 16, 4:23 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Oct 16, 4:23 PM
    securityguy's suggestion sounds very plausible to me as to why one got a new line with different routing.
    • Rubidium
    • By Rubidium 10th Oct 16, 4:38 PM
    • 478 Posts
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    Rubidium
    • #8
    • 10th Oct 16, 4:38 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Oct 16, 4:38 PM
    Rubidium - it sounds like the cable to my partners would have to take a seriously long route as we are in adjoining properties.
    Originally posted by rmg1
    In some roads some properties will be fed from one cabinet or pole and other properties from another one.

    Another possible explanation

    The line to the property may actually be routed though say four cables and five junction boxes from the property to the exchange e.g.

    property > cable 1 > cable 2 > cable 3 > cable 4 > exchange

    When line faults are reported, they often have no option but to use an alternative pair back to the exchange, this happens quite often and there are limited number of pairs in each cable.

    if certain pairs in cable 3 became faulty and marked unusable and there were no other unused spare pairs available they could then route as follows:

    property > cable 1 > cable 2 > cable x > cable y > cable 4 > exchange

    Using extra cables x & y to bypass the fully used cable 3 could easily add an extra km to the line length and hence the increased attenuation and reduced ADSL speed.

    Sky or any ISP are limited by the line attenuation.
    • rmg1
    • By rmg1 11th Oct 16, 11:24 AM
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    rmg1
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 11:24 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Oct 16, 11:24 AM
    Thanks for that, it sounds feasible enough.
    Is there anything that can be done to sort it out?
    Flagellation, necrophilia and bestiality - Am I flogging a dead horse?

    Any posts are my opinion and only that. Please read at your own risk.
    • Rubidium
    • By Rubidium 11th Oct 16, 11:33 AM
    • 478 Posts
    • 271 Thanks
    Rubidium
    Thanks for that, it sounds feasible enough.
    Is there anything that can be done to sort it out?
    Originally posted by rmg1
    Nothing that you can do but your partner next door could cancel theirs and use your broadband with very little effort. This is MSE after all.
    • rmg1
    • By rmg1 11th Oct 16, 11:42 AM
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    rmg1
    Would that work through a couple of stud walls and a brick wall?
    I get enough issues connecting to wifi through the stud walls.
    Flagellation, necrophilia and bestiality - Am I flogging a dead horse?

    Any posts are my opinion and only that. Please read at your own risk.
    • takman
    • By takman 11th Oct 16, 9:19 PM
    • 1,526 Posts
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    takman
    Would that work through a couple of stud walls and a brick wall?
    I get enough issues connecting to wifi through the stud walls.
    Originally posted by rmg1
    If the signal can't be picked up in the other house you could run an ethernet cable between the properties then connect a wifi hotspot to the cable.
    • rmg1
    • By rmg1 12th Oct 16, 8:49 AM
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    rmg1
    I think the council might have something to say about that!
    Flagellation, necrophilia and bestiality - Am I flogging a dead horse?

    Any posts are my opinion and only that. Please read at your own risk.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 12th Oct 16, 9:22 AM
    • 5,274 Posts
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    Norman Castle
    Would that work through a couple of stud walls and a brick wall?
    I get enough issues connecting to wifi through the stud walls.
    Originally posted by rmg1
    Try disconnecting and connecting to the other signal. Moving the router could help.
    Too cool for school. Also too old for school.
    • takman
    • By takman 12th Oct 16, 9:53 AM
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    takman
    I think the council might have something to say about that!
    Originally posted by rmg1
    But you said that you live next to each other so I'm assuming that you wouldn't have to run the cable across anyone else's land or public road etc.

    What would make the council object to a cable between the properties?
    • rmg1
    • By rmg1 12th Oct 16, 2:16 PM
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    rmg1
    @Norman - I probably could move the router or get a wireless AP to extend the range.

    @takman - drilling holes right through the walls just to poke a network cable through might make them a bit upset as these are council properties.
    Flagellation, necrophilia and bestiality - Am I flogging a dead horse?

    Any posts are my opinion and only that. Please read at your own risk.
    • takman
    • By takman 12th Oct 16, 6:38 PM
    • 1,526 Posts
    • 1,164 Thanks
    takman
    @Norman - I probably could move the router or get a wireless AP to extend the range.

    @takman - drilling holes right through the walls just to poke a network cable through might make them a bit upset as these are council properties.
    Originally posted by rmg1
    I dont think they will mind, people do alot worse to council houses without reprocussions. The worst case scenario is that you may have to fill in the hole when you move out. So if your both planning to stay there a few years it may be worth it.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 12th Oct 16, 7:58 PM
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    Norman Castle
    @Norman - I probably could move the router or get a wireless AP to extend the range.
    Originally posted by rmg1
    Before assuming it will be a problem start by trying to connect.

    Click the Quote button to reply to a post.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 13-10-2016 at 8:18 AM.
    Too cool for school. Also too old for school.
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