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    • Andrew Ryan 89
    • By Andrew Ryan 89 10th Oct 16, 11:23 AM
    • 407Posts
    • 237Thanks
    Andrew Ryan 89
    Having the kitchen and lounge in the same room
    • #1
    • 10th Oct 16, 11:23 AM
    Having the kitchen and lounge in the same room 10th Oct 16 at 11:23 AM
    Does anyone else really hate this? It's a common feature in new build flats and mostly down to the lack of space. However, I recently done a viewing at some new build homes down the road from me. All at least 4 bedrooms and have a garage. Floor space is quite decent but again they the kitchen and lounge are in the same room.

    I just can't understand why anyone would have this. My main gripe is the noise if wife is cooking and I'm watching TV or smells lingering after you have cooked.

    I remember one viewing we done and you could open the oven from the sofa!


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    Last edited by MSE Jessica; 25-10-2016 at 3:17 PM.
Page 3
    • nirajn123
    • By nirajn123 26th Oct 16, 12:35 PM
    • 111 Posts
    • 23 Thanks
    nirajn123
    Over the years living in different cities, we mainly had separate kitchens in rented flats, but the last one we moved out of three years ago was an open plan. My wife is a big TV buff and loved the fact that she can keep an eye on our son who was three at the time and also have one eye on TV while cooking (we both cook btw). She likes to keep kitchen tidy but also had an added incentive to keep it cleaner when it was open plan for when friends come around. I don't mind either set-up, open plan works well for a small family though.

    When we brought a house 3 years ago - an Edwardian terrace with a large open plan kitchen diner and a separate reception room, she misses not having TV right in front of her when she is cooking and general chatter if I am to sit and watch TV in the other room. She would happily go back to previous place.
    • vansboy
    • By vansboy 26th Oct 16, 2:58 PM
    • 5,639 Posts
    • 4,004 Thanks
    vansboy
    Please see my thread
    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5546690

    It keeps the kitchen to one side, so there is a long, potentially seperate, living space with the fireplace at one end and garden at the other.

    But still open-plan.

    VB
    • Hoploz
    • By Hoploz 26th Oct 16, 4:10 PM
    • 3,037 Posts
    • 2,689 Thanks
    Hoploz
    I'm on my second house with large open plan kitchen/dining/lounge areas. First time we extended and I designed it like that, second time it's just lucky it's like I had before.

    I found it good when I had toddlers - yes they can get to the cupboards but actually you are there in the room so as long as you use those childproof plastic lock thingies it's not a dangerous place - obvs you have the benefit that you're sitting down while the pans are cooking and you can still see them and the child so can address any danger before it happens.

    However, I think it is essential to have a separate lounge as well. We always sit in the separate lounge in the evening as it is cosier and also yes, away from any dishwasher noise.

    A friend of mine has open plan as well but uses her separate lounge as a kids playroom instead. They are currently building a shed in the garden with a log burner to spend their evenings ... this tells me they also yearn for somewhere cosier than their huge room as well!
    • BobbinAlong
    • By BobbinAlong 27th Oct 16, 10:40 AM
    • 140 Posts
    • 137 Thanks
    BobbinAlong
    We joke that I wanted to watch TV whilst cooking so he moved the kitchen to the TV. In reality we've moved the kitchen temporarily into the lounge and the hall has become the utility room with machines whilst we knock down the old single storey kitchen and build a new two storey extension with big kitchen !!! dining room and a separate utility room. It would be impossible if we had to house the washing machine, dryer and dishwasher in the kitchen - they need shutting away and the breadmaker goes out there too!
    The plus side of socialising whilst cooking is nice and we have only adults in the family but it leaves a living/dining area that is too small for proper entertaining - four people is a crowd!
    I'm so looking forward to getting the building done and retrieving a proper living room - which will get double French doors through to the new dining room area in the new kitchen so we can open wide when needed or close off for privacy and peace which gives us the best of both worlds.
    Last edited by BobbinAlong; 27-10-2016 at 10:43 AM.
    • Ramona123
    • By Ramona123 27th Oct 16, 2:38 PM
    • 20 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    Ramona123
    I would not have the kitchen and the lounge in the same room for 2 practical reasons.

    (1) The noise from cooking and an extractor fan can be deafening
    (2) Smells that can be kinda kept in the kitchen are going to get everywhere!
    • Elfbert
    • By Elfbert 27th Oct 16, 10:43 PM
    • 444 Posts
    • 492 Thanks
    Elfbert
    I think it depends - we're about to move from our open plan lounge-kitchen-diner to a new flat which, whilst I think is technically open-plan, has walls separating these areas, just not doors. The kitchen/dining room is like the top of a T and the lounge the bottom bit.

    I've been vegetarian all my adult life, and my partner is too, so never lived with the smell of cooked fish hanging around after dinner, or I might feel more strongly about it all

    (I also grew up in a house where the kitchen is the hub of all social activity, so it never seemed that odd to always be around the food prep/aftermath.)
    Mortgage - £68,000 may 2014 46,800.
    • Sarah227
    • By Sarah227 27th Oct 16, 11:32 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Sarah227
    Most new builds these days are tiny and all are way overpriced. Someone pointed out that they are selling the lifestyle and it's true people still watch programmes such as Friends where everything was open plan and think that's the way forward. They forget that in reality we don't go downstairs to a basement to do our laundry we have washing machines in our kitchens and cookers with extractor fans and watching tv with these appliances on is a blooming nightmare. On top of that, huge gripe with new build houses/flats, why on earth do they insist on putting a loo right outside your living room and kitchen doors 😖 I get that a downstairs loo is convenient but I don't want to hear people peeing (or worse) while I'm sat watching Corrie 🙈
    • vansboy
    • By vansboy 28th Oct 16, 9:26 AM
    • 5,639 Posts
    • 4,004 Thanks
    vansboy
    Most new builds these days are tiny and all are way overpriced. Someone pointed out that they are selling the lifestyle and it's true people still watch programmes such as Friends where everything was open plan and think that's the way forward. They forget that in reality we don't go downstairs to a basement to do our laundry we have washing machines in our kitchens and cookers with extractor fans and watching tv with these appliances on is a blooming nightmare. On top of that, huge gripe with new build houses/flats, why on earth do they insist on putting a loo right outside your living room and kitchen doors 😖 I get that a downstairs loo is convenient but I don't want to hear people peeing (or worse) while I'm sat watching Corrie 🙈
    Originally posted by Sarah227

    It would make more sense for washing machine and dryer, to be upstairs where you take off dirty clothes and store new ones.

    And as for toilet locations, look at this open plan design, on floor plan.

    Ideal if you eaten something that disagrees with tummy and you need to relieve yourself, fast!!

    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/new-homes-for-sale/property-60171647.html

    VB
    • Sarah227
    • By Sarah227 29th Oct 16, 12:19 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Sarah227
    It would make more sense for washing machine and dryer, to be upstairs where you take off dirty clothes and store new ones.

    And as for toilet locations, look at this open plan design, on floor plan.

    Ideal if you eaten something that disagrees with tummy and you need to relieve yourself, fast!!


    VB
    Originally posted by vansboy

    Oh dear lord! That's disgusting 😷😷
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 29th Oct 16, 12:44 AM
    • 55,950 Posts
    • 321,466 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    I like a separate kitchen - because you can shut the door on it when you've not done the washing up and there are assorted plastics and tins lying around drying that will next get as far as the recycling bucket .... and because when I come in from doing the shopping I can drop the bags on the floor/wherever, then just put away any freezer/fridge items and shut the door on the rest until I fancy getting round to emptying the bags (probably done when I'm next waiting for the kettle to boil).

    It's also good with limited cupboard space as there are things everywhere as there's no room for them.

    If one had complete design control though it'd be possible to have an open plan kitchen that was hidden behind a retractable wall/doors. A friend of mine had a smallish modern flat and there were two sliding doors that slid into the wall, completely hidden, that, when open, exposed the kitchen - so "now you see it, now you don't".
    • prosaver
    • By prosaver 29th Oct 16, 7:47 AM
    • 4,998 Posts
    • 3,798 Thanks
    prosaver
    Ive got room for a small table in my kitchen and i built a extension which is a seperate room looking out to the back garden. . Was tempted to have kitchen dinner, but thought of a cosy room clean no clattering plus it would take up a lot of heating,as sometimes i turn the kitchen rad off
    Last edited by prosaver; 29-10-2016 at 8:30 AM.
    Referendum,Lisbon Treaty. shamelessly broken by labour and we never had the chance to vote on probably the most important change in Britain’s sovereignty in hundreds of years. Then Brown slunk off to sign the Treaty alone, away from the cameras and other European leaders, as if embarrassed by this betrayal of the people he’s paid to represent.
    • Frogletina
    • By Frogletina 30th Oct 16, 9:49 AM
    • 2,651 Posts
    • 8,865 Thanks
    Frogletina
    I love my open plan room but part of that is because I live on my own.

    When I have visitors round I don't have to disappear to cook or make a drink and so it is more sociable.

    My washing machine and tumble dryer are off the main room in a tiny utility room but my dishwasher is in the main room which I can hear but is not much of a problem. I have bought the quietest fridge freezer as my previous one was far too noisy.

    frogletina
    Not Rachmaninov
    But Nyman
    The heart asks for pleasure first

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    • robatwork
    • By robatwork 30th Oct 16, 10:50 AM
    • 3,356 Posts
    • 3,563 Thanks
    robatwork
    On the myriad home improvement programs, 99% of which have open-plan living, the main reason cited for this is "I can keep an eye on the children while in the kitchen".

    So it seems to be if children < 12yo go open plan. At some point after that a closed door is very desirable!
    • fourxxxx
    • By fourxxxx 30th Oct 16, 9:35 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    fourxxxx
    No thanks.
    Just think of you settee, always stinking of cooking.
    Kitchen should always be seperate from you living space.
    • treecol
    • By treecol 30th Oct 16, 11:06 PM
    • 218 Posts
    • 28 Thanks
    treecol
    We've recently taken down the wall between the kitchen & dining room. It's been really good for extra space & worktop surface for cooking. But I'm glad we didn't go open plan withe the living room too. I'm always noisy while cooking with my gadgets & extractor, so no one would have been able to sit & watch tv.
    1st time we had friends for dinner after the remodel, they sat at the dining table table whilst I finished the meal. I felt uncomfortable being watched. Also being talked to distracted me (I do go into another zone when I cook!) & I ended up taking a pyrex dish straight from the oven with no glove on. Ouch! Not sure I like guests eating in the same room I've just totally trashed while cooking. But that's just my oddities, maybe.
    However my next door neighbours took walls down to make the whole cooking/dining/living area open plan before putting their house on tne market. The new owners are about to put the walls back in as they don't like noise & smells.
    Perhaps it's an age group thing. We & our new neighbours have no children at home. But the neighbours the other side who've just gone open plan have young children.
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