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    • LadyDee
    • By LadyDee 9th Oct 16, 4:35 PM
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    LadyDee
    Subtitles on TV
    • #1
    • 9th Oct 16, 4:35 PM
    Subtitles on TV 9th Oct 16 at 4:35 PM
    What determines when a TV programme has subtitles?

    I find that I am increasingly in need of subtitles when people with strong accents are involved.

    Before anybody says "get your ears tested", I have, and I have a very tiny hearing loss - not enough to require hearing aids and I can hear perfectly well in other situations - it's just strong accents on the TV that cause me difficulty.
Page 1
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 9th Oct 16, 6:40 PM
    • 5,884 Posts
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    teddysmum
    • #2
    • 9th Oct 16, 6:40 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Oct 16, 6:40 PM
    I've no idea how the choice is made, but as having subtitles or sign language for those who are hard of hearing costs, they will limit the number of programmes covered.


    You loss of hearing is probably not the cause of being unable to tell what is being said, as there have been numerous complaints, especially over premium drama series, where people can't hear what's said as the actors mumble. (Apparently they want to sound realistic, but there's no point in that if people can't tell what's going on; rather like the action programmes filmed in dim candlelight or in near darkness)
    • LadyDee
    • By LadyDee 9th Oct 16, 6:54 PM
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    LadyDee
    • #3
    • 9th Oct 16, 6:54 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Oct 16, 6:54 PM
    I've no idea how the choice is made, but as having subtitles or sign language for those who are hard of hearing costs, they will limit the number of programmes covered.


    You loss of hearing is probably not the cause of being unable to tell what is being said, as there have been numerous complaints, especially over premium drama series, where people can't hear what's said as the actors mumble. (Apparently they want to sound realistic, but there's no point in that if people can't tell what's going on; rather like the action programmes filmed in dim candlelight or in near darkness)
    Originally posted by teddysmum
    Even the newscasters often don't speak clearly.

    There's more than one series I've given up on due to the way actors mumble - and don't get me started on dpcumentaries, where the commentary is competing with natural sounds and music or man-made sound effects - all at the same time! I'll be first in the queue for the TV which enables me to cut out that damned music which has ruined many an otherwise promising documentary.
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 9th Oct 16, 8:54 PM
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    Owain Moneysaver
    • #4
    • 9th Oct 16, 8:54 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Oct 16, 8:54 PM
    What determines when a TV programme has subtitles?
    Originally posted by LadyDee
    Ofcom's Code on Television Access Services sets targets for the amount of TV subtitling, signing and audio-description that eligible broadcasters are required to provide.

    the BBC channels (excluding BBC Parliament) are required to subtitle 100% of their programme content, audio describe 10% of their programme content (except in the case of BBC News), and sign 5% of their content. The corresponding targets for ITV1 (including both the regional and national licensees) and Channel 4 are 90%, 5% and 10%, and for Five and S4C1 80%, 5% and 10%.
    Wins and Freebies: τøøτhραṡτε, τεα-τøώεl
    • Robisere
    • By Robisere 9th Oct 16, 9:51 PM
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    Robisere
    • #5
    • 9th Oct 16, 9:51 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Oct 16, 9:51 PM
    I have a particular type of hearing loss which does not discriminate between sounds, eg when I am in the car I cannot hear conversation from the back seat (sometimes the front as well) over the sound of wind and road noise from the car. I cannot distinguish the sound of the TV and someone talking to me, I have to mute the TV if that happens. I have tried many kinds of hearing aid and each one gives the same result: every sound is amplified, so I still cannot distinguish the difference.

    Subtitles are a godsend for me, but TV sound in drama and documentaries is often completely spoiled for me by the irritating loud, often piercing noise that is supposed to be "music". Quite often, subtitles cannot keep pace with the speech and some hilarious results are typed on the screen. When watching sport, especially football or rugby, I turn down or mute the commentary, because I sometimes wonder if the commentators are watching the same match! They often talk complete drivel about inconsequential 'facts' as well.
    There may be more than one way to skin a cat.
    But the result is always inedible.

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